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Tara Legale
February 11th 07, 04:34 AM
I have a calico who is 8 years old. She has always breathed more rapidly
then other cats, and has always gotten more winded faster than my other
cats. Now that she is getting older, I"m getting more concerned. If
another cat chases her, or she runs around a bit playing, or even if she
goes poop in the litter box, she then breaths very rapid to the point that
I'm afraid she is going to have a heart attack.

I'm planning on taking her to the vet for a check-up and mentioning this to
the vet. Can cats have problems like adults such as hypertention?
irregular heartbeats? or other heart problems that people have? Do they
have meds to help cats with these problems like they do for people?

Maybe it is an enlarged heart, maybe it is even her lungs. I'm so scared to
bring her in for a teeth cleaning because I'm afraid if she has a heart
abnormality, anethesia may kill her. I recently had a dog die from
anethesia so I'm so scared of it.

What sort of tests would a vet do to determine if she has a heart related
problem?

cybercat
February 11th 07, 04:43 AM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
>I have a calico who is 8 years old. She has always breathed more rapidly
>then other cats, and has always gotten more winded faster than my other
>cats. Now that she is getting older, I"m getting more concerned. If
>another cat chases her, or she runs around a bit playing, or even if she
>goes poop in the litter box, she then breaths very rapid to the point that
>I'm afraid she is going to have a heart attack.
>
> I'm planning on taking her to the vet for a check-up and mentioning this
> to the vet. Can cats have problems like adults such as hypertention?
> irregular heartbeats? or other heart problems that people have? Do they
> have meds to help cats with these problems like they do for people?
>
> Maybe it is an enlarged heart, maybe it is even her lungs. I'm so scared
> to bring her in for a teeth cleaning because I'm afraid if she has a heart
> abnormality, anethesia may kill her. I recently had a dog die from
> anethesia so I'm so scared of it.
>
> What sort of tests would a vet do to determine if she has a heart related
> problem?
>


Please see your vet. My cat has heart disease that is controlled with a pill
a day. I don;t understand why you have not taken her to see a vet about this
prior to this.

Tara Legale
February 11th 07, 04:47 AM
I haven't taken her prior because she is fine 95% of the time unless she
exerts herself... which she doesn't hardly do. Just recently she seems to
be a tad worse. I'd taken steps to make sure her stool isn't hard and she
doesn't get constipated and has to struggle, because if she does, she does
breathe heavy. Her relaxed and regular breathing is normal.

So going back to my questions, how did you find out your cat has heart
disease? How old when diagnosed? How old now?


"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> Please see your vet. My cat has heart disease that is controlled with a
> pill a day. I don;t understand why you have not taken her to see a vet
> about this prior to this.

cybercat
February 11th 07, 04:57 AM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
>
> So going back to my questions, how did you find out your cat has heart
> disease?

Rapid breathing when she was five years old. The vet discovered she had a
very rapid heart rate. This is often a sign of an overactive thyroid.
However,
when we had bloodwork done to check her thyroid hormone levels, they were
normal.

>How old when diagnosed? How old now?
>

When she was 8, she finally presented with measurable hyperthyroid.
She was placed on medication and shortly thereafter began having
episodes of unresponsiveness that were similar to mild seizures. We
had an ultrasound of her heart done and it was found to be structurally
sound. Therefore the vet suspected her high heart rate over the years
had resulted in an unstable heart rate (arythmia) that caused brief
episodes of fibrillation. She was placed on beta blockers and never
had another episode. She is now 12 years old and is doing well.

When we adopted her she was severely overweight. After she was
diagnosed with heart disease, we put her on a diet of premium canned
cat food given in scheduled feedings 12 hours apart. She went from 18
pounds to 9 pounds.

She is an active, happy, shiny, assertive and playful cat. No doubt she
would have been dead by now without treatment.

Take your cat to the vet.

cindys
February 11th 07, 05:06 AM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
>I haven't taken her prior because she is fine 95% of the time unless she
>exerts herself... which she doesn't hardly do. Just recently she seems to
>be a tad worse. I'd taken steps to make sure her stool isn't hard and she
>doesn't get constipated and has to struggle, because if she does, she does
>breathe heavy. Her relaxed and regular breathing is normal.
>
> So going back to my questions, how did you find out your cat has heart
> disease? How old when diagnosed? How old now?
----------
My cat, Alex, does not have shortness of breath with exertion, but he does
have a heart murmur with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (enlarged heart). It
was diagnosed when the veterinarian heard the heart murmur during a routine
checkup. He subsequently had an echocardiogram to confirm the suspected
diagnosis. He was placed on diltiazem (a human pill for the same condition
but in an appropriate dose for a cat - diltiazem is very inexpensive). The
vet also put him on aspirin twice a week to prevent a blood clot. A blood
clot is a possible complication of a heart problem. You want to avoid a
blood clot at all costs. If a blood clot were to lodge in your cat's spine,
she could become paralyzed from that point downward and lose control of her
hind legs along with her ability to control her bowels/bladder. Diagnosis of
a heart condition is not difficult and the treatment is inexpensive and
easy. Alex did not have any symptoms at all that I could see before he was
diagnosed.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Phil P.
February 12th 07, 08:38 PM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> I have a calico who is 8 years old. She has always breathed more rapidly
> then other cats, and has always gotten more winded faster than my other
> cats. Now that she is getting older, I"m getting more concerned. If
> another cat chases her, or she runs around a bit playing, or even if she
> goes poop in the litter box, she then breaths very rapid to the point that
> I'm afraid she is going to have a heart attack.
>
> I'm planning on taking her to the vet for a check-up and mentioning this
to
> the vet. Can cats have problems like adults such as hypertention?

Yes. But in cats hypertension is usually secondary to some other problem
(e.g., CRF, hyperthyroidism). Primary hypertension in cats is rare.


> irregular heartbeats?

Yes. Again, arrhythmias in cats are usually secondary to another disease
(eg., HCM)


or other heart problems that people have? Do they
> have meds to help cats with these problems like they do for people?


Absatively! Most of the heart medications used in cats are human drugs.
Diltiazem (Cardizem), a human drug, has turned out to be a wonder drug for
cats with HCM.

>
> Maybe it is an enlarged heart, maybe it is even her lungs. I'm so scared
to
> bring her in for a teeth cleaning because I'm afraid if she has a heart
> abnormality, anethesia may kill her. I recently had a dog die from
> anethesia so I'm so scared of it.
>
> What sort of tests would a vet do to determine if she has a heart related
> problem?

First, you'd want a complete blood work-up (CBC & chemscreen) and
urinalysis. Next, thorough auscultation of the heart- especially the four
major valve areas-- the mitral, pulmonic, aortic, and tricuspid areas.
Then, you'd want to have her blood pressure checked. Finally, a
echocardiogram. Don't waste your money on an EKG. Many cats with heart
disease have normal EKGs.

With proper treatment, most cats with heart disease live near-normal lives.

Phil