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Kimiko-Nami
February 11th 07, 08:08 AM
My cat is blind, and therefore, when she freaks out, she doesn't know what
she's attacking, where she's attacking, and probably even why! She just
started and is freaking out as I type! She's done it before and when it
happens, it lasts for about a week. A long time of no sleep. Right now, she
is in the hallway, growling at shadows on the wall, and attacking, hissing
and growling at her own tail. When you walk by her, she hisses and growls,
then attacks. Luckily though she is declawed, so her attacks don't hurt. I
fear for her life. I fear she may have a heart attack and die.

When I mean by freaking out I mean that, she will attack at nothing, the
slightest touch on her fur will set her smacking your hand or face. (She does
not bite though) She growls and hisses for no reason, even when there is
nothing moving, if she runs into something, she will get fiercly upset and
start 'beating up' the furniture or wall, eventually falling and then batting
at the air. She gets quite scary even though she cannot hurt us. I don't know
what to do, setting her in a quiet room in the dark or light even with
calming music or none at all doesn't help. Throwing a blanket over her does
not help ( I heard it did that's why we tried) Locking her in my dogs kennel
(without the dog inside w/ her) but around us doesn't help, and her roaming
about so she can get calmer and used to her surroundings again doesn't help.
Nothing seems to help. What can i do? I've had her for many years and she is
very important to me. Can anyone help?

Matthew
February 11th 07, 08:19 AM
sounds like she needs a vet visit sounds like some medication will be
needed

"Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> My cat is blind, and therefore, when she freaks out, she doesn't know what
> she's attacking, where she's attacking, and probably even why! She just
> started and is freaking out as I type! She's done it before and when it
> happens, it lasts for about a week. A long time of no sleep. Right now,
> she
> is in the hallway, growling at shadows on the wall, and attacking, hissing
> and growling at her own tail. When you walk by her, she hisses and growls,
> then attacks. Luckily though she is declawed, so her attacks don't hurt. I
> fear for her life. I fear she may have a heart attack and die.
>
> When I mean by freaking out I mean that, she will attack at nothing, the
> slightest touch on her fur will set her smacking your hand or face. (She
> does
> not bite though) She growls and hisses for no reason, even when there is
> nothing moving, if she runs into something, she will get fiercly upset and
> start 'beating up' the furniture or wall, eventually falling and then
> batting
> at the air. She gets quite scary even though she cannot hurt us. I don't
> know
> what to do, setting her in a quiet room in the dark or light even with
> calming music or none at all doesn't help. Throwing a blanket over her
> does
> not help ( I heard it did that's why we tried) Locking her in my dogs
> kennel
> (without the dog inside w/ her) but around us doesn't help, and her
> roaming
> about so she can get calmer and used to her surroundings again doesn't
> help.
> Nothing seems to help. What can i do? I've had her for many years and she
> is
> very important to me. Can anyone help?
>

Rhonda
February 11th 07, 08:34 AM
It does sound like something medical, in addition to her blindness,
could be wrong with her. I think she needs a vet visit too. She could be
in pain. Some cats will act out when when in pain and being blind is
probably doubly scary for her. She could be losing her hearing or any
number of things that frighten her or make her feel more defenseless.

I hope you can find the cause and help her get settled down. It doesn't
sound like just reassurance is helping her.

Let us know what happens,

Rhonda

Matthew wrote:
> sounds like she needs a vet visit sounds like some medication will be
> needed
>
> "Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
>
>>My cat is blind, and therefore, when she freaks out, she doesn't know what
>>she's attacking, where she's attacking, and probably even why! She just
>>started and is freaking out as I type! She's done it before and when it
>>happens, it lasts for about a week. A long time of no sleep. Right now,
>>she
>>is in the hallway, growling at shadows on the wall, and attacking, hissing
>>and growling at her own tail. When you walk by her, she hisses and growls,
>>then attacks. Luckily though she is declawed, so her attacks don't hurt. I
>>fear for her life. I fear she may have a heart attack and die.
>>
>>When I mean by freaking out I mean that, she will attack at nothing, the
>>slightest touch on her fur will set her smacking your hand or face. (She
>>does
>>not bite though) She growls and hisses for no reason, even when there is
>>nothing moving, if she runs into something, she will get fiercly upset and
>>start 'beating up' the furniture or wall, eventually falling and then
>>batting
>>at the air. She gets quite scary even though she cannot hurt us. I don't
>>know
>>what to do, setting her in a quiet room in the dark or light even with
>>calming music or none at all doesn't help. Throwing a blanket over her
>>does
>>not help ( I heard it did that's why we tried) Locking her in my dogs
>>kennel
>>(without the dog inside w/ her) but around us doesn't help, and her
>>roaming
>>about so she can get calmer and used to her surroundings again doesn't
>>help.
>>Nothing seems to help. What can i do? I've had her for many years and she
>>is
>>very important to me. Can anyone help?
>>
>
>
>

Kimiko-Nami
February 11th 07, 09:11 AM
Thank you for your responce, and i think you may be right..te only problem is,
is I have to wait when she gets better in order for us to tke her anywhere.
She will not allow us to pick her up or even try to get her anywhere.
It's also really bad because she does not eat, drink or go to the bathroom
when she is like this. It gets pretty serious.
She does have a vet appointment on Tue, maybe we can mention her problem then.
I never thought about what you said about her maybe hurting or losing hearing
and etc. that sounds like a good explination. Thank you both for your advices.
I appreciate it..

(If anyone else can help, please do)

Rhonda wrote:
>It does sound like something medical, in addition to her blindness,
>could be wrong with her. I think she needs a vet visit too. She could be
>in pain. Some cats will act out when when in pain and being blind is
>probably doubly scary for her. She could be losing her hearing or any
>number of things that frighten her or make her feel more defenseless.
>
>I hope you can find the cause and help her get settled down. It doesn't
>sound like just reassurance is helping her.
>
>Let us know what happens,
>
>Rhonda
>
>> sounds like she needs a vet visit sounds like some medication will be
>> needed
>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
>>>is
>>>very important to me. Can anyone help?

Captain Bob
February 11th 07, 10:50 AM
On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 08:11:52 GMT
"Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote:

>
> (If anyone else can help, please do)
>

When Tania gets very upset at something, we put some "Rescue
Remedy" [ http://www.entirelypets.com/bachmain.html?gclid=CLbz0-mEpooCFRgXgQodVWXzpw ]
on her paws. After a few minutes of her cleaning it off, she is quite a
bit calmer.

Good luck!

Bob

--
/"\
\ / ASCII Ribbon Campaign - Motor Vessel Tamara B
X against HTML email & vCards - http://www.tamara-b.org
/ \
.. . Tania Our Cat http://www.tamara-b.org/tania-portrait2.jpg

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Kimiko-Nami
February 11th 07, 11:40 AM
Hmm, sounds like a good plan to me! I'll do anything to keep her calm. Thank
you for the suggestion and the link. I'll try it out.

Captain Bob wrote:
>> (If anyone else can help, please do)
>
>When Tania gets very upset at something, we put some "Rescue
>Remedy" [ http://www.entirelypets.com/bachmain.html?gclid=CLbz0-mEpooCFRgXgQodVWXzpw ]
>on her paws. After a few minutes of her cleaning it off, she is quite a
>bit calmer.
>
>Good luck!
>
>Bob
>

Louis
February 11th 07, 03:56 PM
"Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> My cat is blind, and therefore, when she freaks out, she doesn't know what
> she's attacking, where she's attacking, and probably even why! She just
> started and is freaking out as I type! She's done it before and when it
> happens, it lasts for about a week. A long time of no sleep. Right now,
she
> is in the hallway, growling at shadows on the wall, and attacking, hissing
> and growling at her own tail. When you walk by her, she hisses and growls,
> then attacks. Luckily though she is declawed, so her attacks don't hurt. I
> fear for her life. I fear she may have a heart attack and die.
>
> When I mean by freaking out I mean that, she will attack at nothing, the
> slightest touch on her fur will set her smacking your hand or face. (She
does
> not bite though) She growls and hisses for no reason, even when there is
> nothing moving, if she runs into something, she will get fiercly upset and
> start 'beating up' the furniture or wall, eventually falling and then
batting
> at the air. She gets quite scary even though she cannot hurt us. I don't
know
> what to do, setting her in a quiet room in the dark or light even with
> calming music or none at all doesn't help. Throwing a blanket over her
does
> not help ( I heard it did that's why we tried) Locking her in my dogs
kennel
> (without the dog inside w/ her) but around us doesn't help, and her
roaming
> about so she can get calmer and used to her surroundings again doesn't
help.
> Nothing seems to help. What can i do? I've had her for many years and she
is
> very important to me. Can anyone help?
>

Sounds like she is afraid and angry about her situation. I think you should
calmly/firmly/lovingly explain to her what is going on and what you expect
from her. Tell her you understand she is frightened and feeling bad. Ask
her what she wants. Communicate at a conscious level. Get in touch with
her feelings as well as your own. Also consider what is going on in your
own life, as animals often reflect what is going on with their owners. Has
there been any big changes or events lately? Is there some bottled up anger
that you have?

Regards,
Louis

Stick Waver
February 11th 07, 04:17 PM
Kimiko-Nami wrote:

> Thank you for your responce, and i think you may be right..te only problem is,
> is I have to wait when she gets better in order for us to tke her anywhere.
> She will not allow us to pick her up or even try to get her anywhere.

Have you tried throwing a towel over her and scooping her up?

> It's also really bad because she does not eat, drink or go to the bathroom
> when she is like this. It gets pretty serious.
> She does have a vet appointment on Tue, maybe we can mention her problem then.
> I never thought about what you said about her maybe hurting or losing hearing
> and etc. that sounds like a good explination. Thank you both for your advices.
> I appreciate it..
>
> (If anyone else can help, please do)
>
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>It does sound like something medical, in addition to her blindness,
>>could be wrong with her. I think she needs a vet visit too. She could be
>>in pain. Some cats will act out when when in pain and being blind is
>>probably doubly scary for her. She could be losing her hearing or any
>>number of things that frighten her or make her feel more defenseless.
>>
>>I hope you can find the cause and help her get settled down. It doesn't
>>sound like just reassurance is helping her.
>>
>>Let us know what happens,
>>
>>Rhonda
>>
>>
>>>sounds like she needs a vet visit sounds like some medication will be
>>>needed
>>
>>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
>>
>>>>is
>>>>very important to me. Can anyone help?
>
>

bookie
February 11th 07, 06:19 PM
On 11 Feb, 07:08, "Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote:
> My cat is blind, and therefore, when she freaks out, she doesn't know what
> she's attacking, where she's attacking, and probably even why! She just
> started and is freaking out as I type! She's done it before and when it
> happens, it lasts for about a week. A long time of no sleep. Right now, she
> is in the hallway, growling at shadows on the wall, and attacking, hissing
> and growling at her own tail. When you walk by her, she hisses and growls,
> then attacks. Luckily though she is declawed, so her attacks don't hurt. I
> fear for her life. I fear she may have a heart attack and die.
>
> When I mean by freaking out I mean that, she will attack at nothing, the
> slightest touch on her fur will set her smacking your hand or face. (She does
> not bite though) She growls and hisses for no reason, even when there is
> nothing moving, if she runs into something, she will get fiercly upset and
> start 'beating up' the furniture or wall, eventually falling and then batting
> at the air. She gets quite scary even though she cannot hurt us. I don't know
> what to do, setting her in a quiet room in the dark or light even with
> calming music or none at all doesn't help. Throwing a blanket over her does
> not help ( I heard it did that's why we tried) Locking her in my dogs kennel
> (without the dog inside w/ her) but around us doesn't help, and her roaming
> about so she can get calmer and used to her surroundings again doesn't help.
> Nothing seems to help. What can i do? I've had her for many years and she is
> very important to me. Can anyone help?

a trip to the vets is in order i think, how old is she? maybe she is
having some kind of seizure or small scale stroke (sorry i do not mean
to scare you) which could explain the freaky behaviour, it may be
treatable by medication, anti-seizure drugs possibly.

have you tried also using a feliway diffuser in your house? if it is
that she is just frightened and there are no real neurological
problems going on then a feliway diffuser may help to calm her down
along with the other suggestions people have put here (rescue remedy
etc).

first thing though is to take her to a vets and make sure they giev
her a thorough check over, ask if they think she may have developed
some sort of neurological problem.

best of luck, bookie

Tara Legale
February 11th 07, 06:51 PM
As a cat owner for many years, but never having a blind cat, I have a
question. Can a blind cat have a good quality of life?

Matthew
February 11th 07, 06:58 PM
Yes other sense take over and adapt to the situation
think of a blind person so they have a good life?

"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> As a cat owner for many years, but never having a blind cat, I have a
> question. Can a blind cat have a good quality of life?
>
>
>

cybercat
February 11th 07, 07:16 PM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> As a cat owner for many years, but never having a blind cat, I have a
> question. Can a blind cat have a good quality of life?
>
>
>

Do a Google search of this group for Duffy. He is Mary L.'s cat. That will
answer your question. Also, a cat named Jasper Dudley is a good example of a
blind cat having a wonderful life.

cindys
February 11th 07, 07:29 PM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> As a cat owner for many years, but never having a blind cat, I have a
> question. Can a blind cat have a good quality of life?
--------
Can a blind person have a good quality of life?
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Cheryl
February 11th 07, 07:35 PM
On Sun 11 Feb 2007 02:08:29a, Kimiko-Nami wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav <news:[email protected]>:

> Nothing seems to help. What can i do? I've had her for many
> years and she is very important to me. Can anyone help?

See if anything in this article sounds familiar. Good luck with her!
http://www.purelypets.com/articles/felinehyperesthesia.htm


--
Cheryl

Rhonda
February 11th 07, 08:47 PM
We wondered about that too -- you can't talk to them and tell them
what's going on and why everything is dark. You can't tell them not to
walk into that closet because they'll have trouble finding their way out...

Our cat went blind and she adapted very well. I think she was losing her
sight for awhile, thinking back about it now, but she did so well that
we didn't notice until she stepped right into her food bowl. I had
wondered why she didn't join in at play time any more. She just sat
behind the cats who were playing.

Anyway, I think cats don't worry about what they've lost, they just do
the best with what they have. We had to make sure she didn't have access
to stairs, that sort of thing, but she had no trouble finding the litter
box and doing much of her normal routine. She would purr and she seemed
happy.

Rhonda

Tara Legale wrote:
> As a cat owner for many years, but never having a blind cat, I have a
> question. Can a blind cat have a good quality of life?

Rhonda
February 11th 07, 08:50 PM
Kimiko, not eating is a problem. Cats can't go more than 24 hours or so
before it starts affecting their liver.

Is there any way to get food into her now? Can you wrap her in a towel
with her head out and try to syringe feed her? We've used meat baby food
(no onions in it) mixed with water, or wet cat food blenderized with
water. She'll need this done today if she's gone a few days already. If
you can't do it you may need to get her into an emergency clinic.

Good luck with her,

Rhonda

Kimiko-Nami wrote:
> Thank you for your responce, and i think you may be right..te only problem is,
> is I have to wait when she gets better in order for us to tke her anywhere.
> She will not allow us to pick her up or even try to get her anywhere.
> It's also really bad because she does not eat, drink or go to the bathroom
> when she is like this. It gets pretty serious.
> She does have a vet appointment on Tue, maybe we can mention her problem then.
> I never thought about what you said about her maybe hurting or losing hearing
> and etc. that sounds like a good explination. Thank you both for your advices.
> I appreciate it..
>
> (If anyone else can help, please do)
>
> Rhonda wrote:
>
>>It does sound like something medical, in addition to her blindness,
>>could be wrong with her. I think she needs a vet visit too. She could be
>>in pain. Some cats will act out when when in pain and being blind is
>>probably doubly scary for her. She could be losing her hearing or any
>>number of things that frighten her or make her feel more defenseless.
>>
>>I hope you can find the cause and help her get settled down. It doesn't
>>sound like just reassurance is helping her.
>>
>>Let us know what happens,
>>
>>Rhonda
>>
>>
>>>sounds like she needs a vet visit sounds like some medication will be
>>>needed
>>
>>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
>>
>>>>is
>>>>very important to me. Can anyone help?
>>>
>

Lynne
February 11th 07, 09:27 PM
on Sun, 11 Feb 2007 07:08:29 GMT, "Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote:

> I've had her for many years and she is
> very important to me. Can anyone help?

The advice you have received to have her checked out by a vet is very
good. Please discuss this at your visit Tuesday and consider having a
full blood panel done in case she has something going on that can be
detected by it.

I know you said you can't pick her up when she is like this, but one of
the things I have done with my 3 year old, when he would occasionally and
apparently randomly act out and attack, was to pick him up, hold him like
a baby and use my lips to "bathe" him, like a mama cat would do. I rub
my lips all over his face, chin and head, with quick motions like a mama
cat uses to bathe her little ones. This always gets him calm and
purring, almost immediately. I also do this when he gets frustrated with
the kitten and it always restores his good mood.

I recommend that you do this on occasions when she is already calm in
order to get her used to it before trying it when she's upset. Both of
my cats love this treatment and relax like babies when I "bathe" them. I
don't do it for too long, though--cats can get overstimulated and that
makes them unhappy. Even if you don't do this specifically, find
something that you know makes her feel good that you can use to soothe
her when she's upset. Since she is blind, I would also make a point to
talk to her while you are comforting her, in soothing, sweet tones. I
wouldn't try anything new when she's already upset, especially since she
is blind and won't know what is happening.

I hope that you are able to discover what is wrong and make her feel
better, very soon.

--
Lynne

Tara Legale
February 12th 07, 12:04 AM
"cindys" > wrote
> Can a blind person have a good quality of life?

Please don't get defensive and think this through. I think it is vastly
different between a cat and a person being blind. If a cat could see and
then went blind, I would imagine them being more scared or confused. A
blind person can speak, hear and ask questions, use a walking stick to feel
their way around, etc. People can find pleasure in their other senses left.
Can a cat find pleasure in hearing birds chirping outside, and not seeing
the birds they know they should be able to see? They can't reason with that
void in their life. I think it would be immensely confusing to a cat and
would think their quality of life would really suffer, not to mention the
dangers of bumping into things, falling down stairs, not being able to
navigate and jump up on things. However, if a cat was born blind than I can
see where they might adapt better because they wouldn't know what they were
missing, however I still think their quality of life is minimal.

Lynne
February 12th 07, 12:38 AM
on Sun, 11 Feb 2007 23:04:49 GMT, "Tara Legale"
> wrote:

> I still think their quality of life is minimal.

You're wrong, and I'm sure Mary L and other owners of blind cats would
agree.

My mom had a cat that went blind and he adapted just fine--very quickly, in
fact. He was playful and happy and affectionate. He also got around just
fine. Unfortunately, he succombed to other health problems, but I have no
doubt he would have had just as full and good a life as her seeing cat
does.

--
Lynne

cindys
February 12th 07, 01:05 AM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> "cindys" > wrote
>> Can a blind person have a good quality of life?
>
> Please don't get defensive and think this through. I think it is vastly
> different between a cat and a person being blind. If a cat could see and
> then went blind, I would imagine them being more scared or confused. A
> blind person can speak, hear and ask questions, use a walking stick to
> feel their way around, etc. People can find pleasure in their other
> senses left. Can a cat find pleasure in hearing birds chirping outside,
> and not seeing the birds they know they should be able to see? They can't
> reason with that void in their life. I think it would be immensely
> confusing to a cat and would think their quality of life would really
> suffer, not to mention the dangers of bumping into things, falling down
> stairs, not being able to navigate and jump up on things. However, if a
> cat was born blind than I can see where they might adapt better because
> they wouldn't know what they were missing, however I still think their
> quality of life is minimal.
----------
In later years, cats and dogs can develop cataracts or more frequently
develop a condition called *nuclear sclerosis* as part of the aging process.
In the situation with a cataract, the animal can essentially become blind
and a surgical procedure is possible to correct the situation. With nuclear
sclerosis, the vision dims, but the animal generally doesn't become
completely blind, and there is no treatment AFAIK. As Alvin, our dog, was
aging, he developed nuclear sclerosis. When we were discussing the situation
with our vet, she explained that animals adapt so well to this loss of
vision that sometimes they have gone completely blind or nearly so, and the
owner will never even realize this is the case. When Molly, our cat, was
nearly 17, you could see that eyes were very cloudy (looked like cataracts
but was nuclear sclerosis), she was still able to jump a distance of several
feet from one counter top to the next and also from the floor to the counter
without missing. I am certain she knew how to do this from experience, as
her vision must have been very poor judging from appearances. If I had to
guess, I would say that animals probably adapt much more readily than
humans. If I were looking to adopt an additional cat and a blind one came my
way, I wouldn't hesitate for a moment.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

ebsterily
February 12th 07, 03:39 AM
I have a blind dog & he gets around good. I wouldnt move anything
around. I would also spend alot of time calming her down - it must be
very frightening for her. reward her with treats & get her purring. I
dont know what a vet could do. I believe she will adapt to ner
blindness. You have to be very patient. I wouldnt sneak up on her &
say her name before you touch her so she doesnt get startled. Best of
luck - Im sure that she means very much to you & you will work it
out. You can send me a pix & I put her up on my website.
www.jzigns.com under our friends
On Feb 10, 11:08 pm, "Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote:
> My cat is blind, and therefore, when she freaks out, she doesn't know what
> she's attacking, where she's attacking, and probably even why! She just
> started and is freaking out as I type! She's done it before and when it
> happens, it lasts for about a week. A long time of no sleep. Right now, she
> is in the hallway, growling at shadows on the wall, and attacking, hissing
> and growling at her own tail. When you walk by her, she hisses and growls,
> then attacks. Luckily though she is declawed, so her attacks don't hurt. I
> fear for her life. I fear she may have a heart attack and die.
>
> When I mean by freaking out I mean that, she will attack at nothing, the
> slightest touch on her fur will set her smacking your hand or face. (She does
> not bite though) She growls and hisses for no reason, even when there is
> nothing moving, if she runs into something, she will get fiercly upset and
> start 'beating up' the furniture or wall, eventually falling and then batting
> at the air. She gets quite scary even though she cannot hurt us. I don't know
> what to do, setting her in a quiet room in the dark or light even with
> calming music or none at all doesn't help. Throwing a blanket over her does
> not help ( I heard it did that's why we tried) Locking her in my dogs kennel
> (without the dog inside w/ her) but around us doesn't help, and her roaming
> about so she can get calmer and used to her surroundings again doesn't help.
> Nothing seems to help. What can i do? I've had her for many years and she is
> very important to me. Can anyone help?

Rhonda
February 12th 07, 03:53 AM
Tara, post again once you've lived with a blind cat.

Rhonda

Tara Legale wrote:
> Please don't get defensive and think this through. I think it is vastly
> different between a cat and a person being blind. If a cat could see and
> then went blind, I would imagine them being more scared or confused. A
> blind person can speak, hear and ask questions, use a walking stick to feel
> their way around, etc. People can find pleasure in their other senses left.
> Can a cat find pleasure in hearing birds chirping outside, and not seeing
> the birds they know they should be able to see? They can't reason with that
> void in their life. I think it would be immensely confusing to a cat and
> would think their quality of life would really suffer, not to mention the
> dangers of bumping into things, falling down stairs, not being able to
> navigate and jump up on things. However, if a cat was born blind than I can
> see where they might adapt better because they wouldn't know what they were
> missing, however I still think their quality of life is minimal.
>
>

Tara Legale
February 12th 07, 04:38 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote
> Tara, post again once you've lived with a blind cat.

I'll post again whenever I feel like it. I see nothing wrong with what I
wrote.

Tara Legale
February 12th 07, 04:42 AM
"Rhonda" > wrote
> Tara, post again once you've lived with a blind cat.

I wasn't making any statements against blind cats. If you look at my first
post it was an innocent question. I just am trying to understand if a cat
can live a good life blind. Then someone asked if a blind person can,
obviously being sarcastic, and I replied trying to sort out the possible
differences between people and cats. I meant no harm in my inquiry, people
shouldn't be so sensitive and defensive when someone asks a question.

Rhonda
February 12th 07, 05:36 AM
Tara Legale wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote
>
>>Tara, post again once you've lived with a blind cat.
>
> I wasn't making any statements against blind cats. If you look at my first
> post it was an innocent question. I just am trying to understand if a cat
> can live a good life blind. Then someone asked if a blind person can,
> obviously being sarcastic, and I replied trying to sort out the possible
> differences between people and cats. I meant no harm in my inquiry, people
> shouldn't be so sensitive and defensive when someone asks a question.

Tara, take your own advice and don't get sensitive and defensive. Yes,
you can post whenever you like and say whatever you want. So can I.

Listen to some of us who have lived with blind cats and who have seen
how resilient they can be. They don't dwell on negatives like us humans,
they keep going with whatever they have. They purr, they play, they get
excited at dinner time... Mary has a younger one who loves to climb cat
trees!

I would love to know what you think after living with a blind cat and
seeing it first-hand for yourself.

Rhonda

Kimiko-Nami via CatKB.com
February 12th 07, 05:46 AM
Lynne wrote:
>> I've had her for many years and she is
>> very important to me. Can anyone help?

Thank you for all your help, it's still going on, and from what I read from
your responces, now I'm really scared. The fact is, is I can't pick her up,
she'll only freak out more, she won't eat at all, not even when we tried the
towel thing, I don't have a siringe (sorry if i misspelled it) and I can't
take her to the emergency room because I cannot drive for I am only 15 and my
parents can't really drive her right now. It's later and I don't think any
vets are open.

To answer some of your question from what i remember reading,
-she is 14 years old
-yes she has adapted very well with her blindness...although, i feel foolish
for not pointing the fact that she is not completely, blind, she can see only
shadows, but i'd say her vision is about 1-3% which isn't very much.
-I cannot pick her up, if I do, she will freak out even more, and if i even
try to touch her, she will go insane
-ONe of you said that her actions may be caused because of some changes or
how I am feeling. Yes there have been changes, I have not been at home as
much, and have not been paying as much attention to her as much as I probably
should, for I have been busy. I have been in a lower mood, my sadness has
increased lately for issues i will not state. Could that be the cause?

This is the second day she has not eaten or drinken...could that kill her?
I am so worried.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200702/1

Kimiko-Nami via CatKB.com
February 12th 07, 05:52 AM
Thank you, but see, she has been blind her whole life, she is used to it. She
gets adapted very well with new surroundings. She in fact has moved her whole
life, with the fact that she has been living with marines. Every house we've
lived in, she's been ok. Even those with stairs.
So, I'm sure it's not her adapting problem, i'm starting to think she could
be injured for some reason, or she may be getting sick, or even worse, a
slight stroke.
Thank you for your help though, it is appreciated. I'm sorry i do not have
any pix for you though. None on my computer at least. Thanks again.

ebsterily wrote:
>I have a blind dog & he gets around good. I wouldnt move anything

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

cindys
February 12th 07, 06:05 AM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> "Rhonda" > wrote
>> Tara, post again once you've lived with a blind cat.
>
> I wasn't making any statements against blind cats. If you look at my
> first post it was an innocent question. I just am trying to understand if
> a cat can live a good life blind. Then someone asked if a blind person
> can, obviously being sarcastic, and I replied trying to sort out the
> possible differences between people and cats. I meant no harm in my
> inquiry, people shouldn't be so sensitive and defensive when someone asks
> a question.
--------
It's difficult to understand someone's tone on Usenet. Any time "quality of
life," issues arise (be it an animal or a person), the implication is that
if someone does not have a good "quality of life" perhaps the person/animal
would be better off dead. Obviously, we don't put humans "out of their
misery", but with animals, we have that option. I read your question to be a
subtle suggestion that perhaps blind cats belonged in this category,
particularly since you were arguing that they did not have a good quality of
life. If people here had agreed with you, in what direction would the
conversation have naturally begun to flow? If that was not your implication,
I apologize, but I don't think I'm the only person here who thought that was
where you were heading.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

bookie
February 12th 07, 04:27 PM
On 12 Feb, 05:05, "cindys" > wrote:
> "Tara Legale" > wrote in message
>
> ...> "Rhonda" > wrote
> >> Tara, post again once you've lived with a blind cat.
>
> > I wasn't making any statements against blind cats. If you look at my
> > first post it was an innocent question. I just am trying to understand if
> > a cat can live a good life blind. Then someone asked if a blind person
> > can, obviously being sarcastic, and I replied trying to sort out the
> > possible differences between people and cats. I meant no harm in my
> > inquiry, people shouldn't be so sensitive and defensive when someone asks
> > a question.
>
> --------
> It's difficult to understand someone's tone on Usenet. Any time "quality of
> life," issues arise (be it an animal or a person), the implication is that
> if someone does not have a good "quality of life" perhaps the person/animal
> would be better off dead. Obviously, we don't put humans "out of their
> misery", but with animals, we have that option. I read your question to be a
> subtle suggestion that perhaps blind cats belonged in this category,
> particularly since you were arguing that they did not have a good quality of
> life. If people here had agreed with you, in what direction would the
> conversation have naturally begun to flow? If that was not your implication,
> I apologize, but I don't think I'm the only person here who thought that was
> where you were heading.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.

i certainly got the sense that the conversation was going in the
direction of "shouldn't we just put cats with the smallest disability
to sleep" which is something which would have got me posting away
furiously in anger. I woudl then have to ask why we don't put humans
to sleep permamanantly when they become blind/deaf/paralysed etc of
anyone who supported this abhorrent idea, as to me it is the same.

although the life of a cat is to me just as precious as that of a
human (maybe even more so; how many cats are as malicious as humans,
how many have contributed as extensively to the destruction of our
planet as humans?) and as such i would not hear of such an outrageous
proposition, there are some differences as has been outlined already
by previous posters. Cats do not dwell on the past, they do nto have
the same capacity for language which is required for this and they do
not consciously miss a sense once it has gone, they just adapt as
though nothing has happened. We have not yet established whether this
cat has been blind from birth or not yet (or have we?) in which case
it would not know what it is missing, much like a human who has been
blind from birth, which obviously will have an effect on what is going
on here.

I think we must put our on dependancy on sight onto cats without
realising that they in fact have a 6th sense whereby they 'taste'
smells using the jacobson organ in the roof of the mouth, which may
also come into play much more strongly when they lose another sense. I
wonder if you could talk to a cat and tell it that humans do not have
this ability to taste the air whether the cat might not pity us and
think that we must have such a poor quality of life for not having
this extra sense!

something you must understand before postign to this group is that the
majority of people here are very pro-cat welfare and may have or have
had cats which have been rescued from shelters and quite literally
snatched back from the jaws of death where they had been taken purely
because their previous owners considered them to be unsuitable,
undesirable, substandard, or unlovable purely because of a minor
disability such as blindness or in some cases because the cat did not
match the wallpaper or the family got 'bored' of it (that still does
my head in, who says the cat did not get bored of the family a long
time before?). Therefore any slight hint that a cat should be disposed
of simply because it has a minor disability or is not picture perfect
in someone's eyes is going to raise a wave of outrage here amongst
people who choose to fill their lives and their homes with such feline
'outcasts', and understandably so.

anyway my own outcast is demanding attention so i must go and attend
to her needs for fuss and adoration.
bookie

ps, another top tip, declawing is not exactly popular here either
before you go down that road too

bookie
February 12th 07, 04:32 PM
On 12 Feb, 04:46, "Kimiko-Nami via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote:
> Lynne wrote:
> >> I've had her for many years and she is
> >> very important to me. Can anyone help?
>
> Thank you for all your help, it's still going on, and from what I read from
> your responces, now I'm really scared. The fact is, is I can't pick her up,
> she'll only freak out more, she won't eat at all, not even when we tried the
> towel thing, I don't have a siringe (sorry if i misspelled it) and I can't
> take her to the emergency room because I cannot drive for I am only 15 and my
> parents can't really drive her right now. It's later and I don't think any
> vets are open.
>
> To answer some of your question from what i remember reading,
> -she is 14 years old
> -yes she has adapted very well with her blindness...although, i feel foolish
> for not pointing the fact that she is not completely, blind, she can see only
> shadows, but i'd say her vision is about 1-3% which isn't very much.
> -I cannot pick her up, if I do, she will freak out even more, and if i even
> try to touch her, she will go insane
> -ONe of you said that her actions may be caused because of some changes or
> how I am feeling. Yes there have been changes, I have not been at home as
> much, and have not been paying as much attention to her as much as I probably
> should, for I have been busy. I have been in a lower mood, my sadness has
> increased lately for issues i will not state. Could that be the cause?
>
> This is the second day she has not eaten or drinken...could that kill her?
> I am so worried.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.comhttp://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200702/1

just get her to a vet asap, get your parents to drive you with her or
get a taxi when the vets are open, no need to be scared, at least you
aer donig the right thing by askign some questions for her sake

Phil P.
February 12th 07, 09:08 PM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> As a cat owner for many years, but never having a blind cat, I have a
> question. Can a blind cat have a good quality of life?


A blind cat can not only have a good quality of life, but in fact a better
quality of life than a blind human. Cats don't attach the emotional bondage
to being blind that humans do. Cats just do what they do best-- adapt.

http://maxshouse.com/bitsys_page.htm

Phil P.
February 12th 07, 09:08 PM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
> "cindys" > wrote
> > Can a blind person have a good quality of life?
>
> Please don't get defensive and think this through. I think it is vastly
> different between a cat and a person being blind. If a cat could see and
> then went blind, I would imagine them being more scared or confused. A
> blind person can speak, hear and ask questions, use a walking stick to
feel
> their way around, etc. People can find pleasure in their other senses
left.
> Can a cat find pleasure in hearing birds chirping outside, and not seeing
> the birds they know they should be able to see? They can't reason with
that
> void in their life. I think it would be immensely confusing to a cat and
> would think their quality of life would really suffer, not to mention the
> dangers of bumping into things, falling down stairs, not being able to
> navigate and jump up on things. However, if a cat was born blind than I
can
> see where they might adapt better because they wouldn't know what they
were
> missing, however I still think their quality of life is minimal.

Having worked with several blind cats, I can say with absolute certainty,
you are absolutely wrong. In fact, you couldn't possibly be *more* wrong!
You need to speak with people who actually have blind cats, or who've worked
with blind cats. IOW, people who know what they're talking about.

Our cat Bitsy is a shining example of the insuppressible resilience of the
cat. She's been blind for almost a year now, and if you didn't see she had
no eyes, you wouldn't know she was blind! It took her a few weeks to map
her environment in her mind. Now, she navigates and *jumps* with ease.

She sits by the windows and crouches when she hears birds, and-even runs
from window to window to follow the birds- exactly like a sighted cat. She
runs up and down stairs just as fast- if not actually faster than the other
cats in the house. Most of her toys have bells or rattlers inside that she
swats around as if she sees them. When the toys stop rolling, she pounces
on them with pin-point accuracy.

No one can convince me that she's not a happy cat or her quality of life is
minimal!

Captain Bob
February 12th 07, 10:31 PM
On Sun, 11 Feb 2007 07:08:29 GMT
"Kimiko-Nami" <[email protected]> wrote:

Our Tania "freaks out" when she hears certain sounds. Notably, those
high-pitched repetitive "music notes" emitted by cell phones.

She will viciously attack anyone nearby when she hears it.

Once we realized what the trigger was, we eliminated the trigger. No
one comes aboard (we live on a boat) with cell phones which are not set
to vibrate.

Somehow, you need to identify and eliminate the trigger(s) which
represent a threat to your cat.

Bob

--
/"\
\ / ASCII Ribbon Campaign - Motor Vessel Tamara B
X against HTML email & vCards - http://www.tamara-b.org
/ \ Tania Our Cat http://www.tamara-b.org/t1.jpg
.. . http://www.tamara-b.org/t2.jpg

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Lynne
February 12th 07, 11:04 PM
on Mon, 12 Feb 2007 21:31:08 GMT, Captain Bob >
wrote:

> we live on a boat

Oooh, color me envious!

I once chartered a sailboat in the Virgin Islands. The captain and his
wife "guaranteed sunshine." They had a very cool cat on the boat with us
named Sunshine. :)

--
Lynne

Reel McKoi
March 22nd 07, 02:08 AM
On Feb 11, 9:42 pm, "Tara Legale" > wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote
>
> > Tara, post again once you've lived with a blind cat.
>
> I wasn't making any statements against blind cats. If you look at my first
> post it was an innocent question. I just am trying to understand if a cat
> can live a good life blind. Then someone asked if a blind person can,
> obviously being sarcastic, and I replied trying to sort out the possible
> differences between people and cats. I meant no harm in my inquiry, people
> shouldn't be so sensitive and defensive when someone asks a question.

Its a hell of anote to support and be a cat killer like Tara
Legale....Maybe that fat ass needs to have her ass whippped instead.
The odassity to arbitrarily up and killa cat just because its blind
is insane.