PDA

View Full Version : I'm going to grab the outdoor cat tomorrow I think


dgk
February 16th 07, 12:50 AM
I've been feeding this cat for a few weeks now and we have established
a routine. As soon as it gets dark I bring out the food and he (she?)
shows up. I get rubbed a bit as I scoop out the food. I could have
grabbed him yesterday or today, but I can't deal with him yet. I've
been waiting for the weekend. I spoke to the vet and he said just
bring him in at 8 am any morning. No charge for boarding while the
fixin and testin get done. Hopefully I won't get charged too much for
the other stuff.

My plan is to have the carrier by the front door, put the snatch on
when he comes close for the food, and drop him in the carrier. Then
hustle him upstairs to the Cat Introduction Room where he'll stay
until Saturday morning. I think I'm only going to get one shot at this
so it had better work the first time.

The boys (Espy and Nipsy) will likely freak out. I'd best see if I can
find that old Feliway spray. I hope it doesn't go bad.

Assuming the tests are ok, I'll probably try to make him an indoor
cat. That will be tough as he's spent his whole life (which isn't very
long I think) outside as far as I can tell. I have Espy and Nipsy
pretty well convinced that they can't get out of the backyard. I'll
have to watch this one closely. Still, if he gets out, he certainly
knows the neighborhood. I just don't want him teaching E&N bad tricks.

mlbriggs
February 16th 07, 02:34 AM
On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 18:50:22 -0500, dgk wrote:

> I've been feeding this cat for a few weeks now and we have established
> a routine. As soon as it gets dark I bring out the food and he (she?)
> shows up. I get rubbed a bit as I scoop out the food. I could have
> grabbed him yesterday or today, but I can't deal with him yet. I've
> been waiting for the weekend. I spoke to the vet and he said just
> bring him in at 8 am any morning. No charge for boarding while the
> fixin and testin get done. Hopefully I won't get charged too much for
> the other stuff.
>
> My plan is to have the carrier by the front door, put the snatch on
> when he comes close for the food, and drop him in the carrier. Then
> hustle him upstairs to the Cat Introduction Room where he'll stay
> until Saturday morning. I think I'm only going to get one shot at this
> so it had better work the first time.
>
> The boys (Espy and Nipsy) will likely freak out. I'd best see if I can
> find that old Feliway spray. I hope it doesn't go bad.
>
> Assuming the tests are ok, I'll probably try to make him an indoor
> cat. That will be tough as he's spent his whole life (which isn't very
> long I think) outside as far as I can tell. I have Espy and Nipsy
> pretty well convinced that they can't get out of the backyard. I'll
> have to watch this one closely. Still, if he gets out, he certainly
> knows the neighborhood. I just don't want him teaching E&N bad tricks.


Best wishes for a successful snatch! MLB

February 16th 07, 02:48 AM
In article >,
dgk > wrote:

> My plan is to have the carrier by the front door, put the snatch on
> when he comes close for the food, and drop him in the carrier. Then
> hustle him upstairs to the Cat Introduction Room where he'll stay
> until Saturday morning. I think I'm only going to get one shot at this
> so it had better work the first time.

Unless you know this cat well and have picked it up before, I highly
recommend using a live trap instead. If you can't do that, please,
please, please wear heavy protective gloves (preferably thick leather)
when handling it.

Neither the cat nor you will be served by shedding blood and missing the
vet appointment because of the animal's panic.

Take it from someone who has been mauled twice by animals while trying
to help them.

MaryL
February 16th 07, 03:11 AM
> wrote in message
...
> In article >,
> dgk > wrote:
>
>> My plan is to have the carrier by the front door, put the snatch on
>> when he comes close for the food, and drop him in the carrier. Then
>> hustle him upstairs to the Cat Introduction Room where he'll stay
>> until Saturday morning. I think I'm only going to get one shot at this
>> so it had better work the first time.
>
> Unless you know this cat well and have picked it up before, I highly
> recommend using a live trap instead. If you can't do that, please,
> please, please wear heavy protective gloves (preferably thick leather)
> when handling it.
>
> Neither the cat nor you will be served by shedding blood and missing the
> vet appointment because of the animal's panic.
>
> Take it from someone who has been mauled twice by animals while trying
> to help them.

Good advice. A live trap would be safer (and kinder) for both of you --
feline and hoomin.

MaryL

dgk
February 16th 07, 03:29 AM
On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 20:11:35 -0600, "MaryL"
-OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote:

>
> wrote in message
...
>> In article >,
>> dgk > wrote:
>>
>>> My plan is to have the carrier by the front door, put the snatch on
>>> when he comes close for the food, and drop him in the carrier. Then
>>> hustle him upstairs to the Cat Introduction Room where he'll stay
>>> until Saturday morning. I think I'm only going to get one shot at this
>>> so it had better work the first time.
>>
>> Unless you know this cat well and have picked it up before, I highly
>> recommend using a live trap instead. If you can't do that, please,
>> please, please wear heavy protective gloves (preferably thick leather)
>> when handling it.
>>
>> Neither the cat nor you will be served by shedding blood and missing the
>> vet appointment because of the animal's panic.
>>
>> Take it from someone who has been mauled twice by animals while trying
>> to help them.
>
>Good advice. A live trap would be safer (and kinder) for both of you --
>feline and hoomin.
>
>MaryL
>

This is a very friendly cat but I understand the concern. I don't
really have room for a live trap out front, it's a very small area. I
have every intention of wearing heavy gloves - in addition to the
scratching problem it happens to be very cold out.

The tough part will be once I get into the Cat Introduction Room. I
wasn't planning on keeping him in the carrier. I was going to let him
out in that small room, with a litterbox and food. Then, the next
morning, I would have to get him into the carrier for the trip to the
vet, without him getting into the rest of the house where a screaming
riot would certainly take place.

I've been betting on the fact that he seems so friendly. Maybe not a
good idea? I really can't keep him in the carrier for the whole night.
It's a big carrier but there would need to be something for a
litterbox in it.

Annie Wxill
February 16th 07, 05:25 AM
"dgk" > wrote in message
...
> This is a very friendly cat but I understand the concern. I don't
> really have room for a live trap out front, it's a very small area. I
> have every intention of wearing heavy gloves - in addition to the
> scratching problem it happens to be very cold out.
>
> The tough part will be once I get into the Cat Introduction Room. I
> wasn't planning on keeping him in the carrier. I was going to let him
> out in that small room, with a litterbox and food. Then, the next
> morning, I would have to get him into the carrier for the trip to the
> vet, without him getting into the rest of the house where a screaming
> riot would certainly take place.
>
> I've been betting on the fact that he seems so friendly. Maybe not a
> good idea? I really can't keep him in the carrier for the whole night.
> It's a big carrier but there would need to be something for a
> litterbox in it.

Hi Dgk,
I know that you have limited space, but I agree that a humane trap is your
best bet. It can be a real challenge getting a reluctant tame cat into a
carrier. If you wear heavy gloves as you said, you will be less agile when
trying to close and secure the opening if you are able to get the cat into
the carrier. However, you could be seriously hurt if you have no
protection.

Try this (the heavy gloves) with one of your house cats and you will see
what I mean.

Unless the cat is totally willing to enter the carrier, you will have a
terrible time catching him again in that small room if you let him out of
the carrier for the litterbox and food. You can leave him in the carrier
overnight. If he is scheduled for surgery the next day, he should not be
fed the night before, anyway.

You didn't say what kind of carrier you are planning to use. Be aware that
the cat may panic and rip a soft-sided carrier.

When I trapped Rosie (who was wild and untouchable), I used a humane trap in
the evening and put her, still in the trap, in the dry tub in the bathroom.
If she had to do any business, if you know what I mean, it wouldn't hurt
anything. I closed the shower curtain and bathroom door.

The next morning, I took the trap, covered with a towel and with the cat
inside, to the vet. I took a hard-sided carrier to the vet so that I would
have something to bring her home in. The vet would be able to put her in
the carrier before she woke up.

Good luck with your plan.

Annie

Gail Futoran
February 16th 07, 05:57 AM
"Annie Wxill" > wrote in message
...
>
> "dgk" > wrote in message
> ...
>> This is a very friendly cat but I understand the concern. I don't
>> really have room for a live trap out front, it's a very small area.
>> I
>> have every intention of wearing heavy gloves - in addition to the
>> scratching problem it happens to be very cold out.
>>
>> The tough part will be once I get into the Cat Introduction Room. I
>> wasn't planning on keeping him in the carrier. I was going to let
>> him
>> out in that small room, with a litterbox and food. Then, the next
>> morning, I would have to get him into the carrier for the trip to
>> the
>> vet, without him getting into the rest of the house where a
>> screaming
>> riot would certainly take place.
>>
>> I've been betting on the fact that he seems so friendly. Maybe not
>> a
>> good idea? I really can't keep him in the carrier for the whole
>> night.
>> It's a big carrier but there would need to be something for a
>> litterbox in it.
>
> Hi Dgk,
> I know that you have limited space, but I agree that a humane trap
> is your best bet. It can be a real challenge getting a reluctant
> tame cat into a carrier. If you wear heavy gloves as you said, you
> will be less agile when trying to close and secure the opening if
> you are able to get the cat into the carrier. However, you could be
> seriously hurt if you have no protection.
>
> Try this (the heavy gloves) with one of your house cats and you will
> see what I mean.
>
> Unless the cat is totally willing to enter the carrier, you will
> have a terrible time catching him again in that small room if you
> let him out of the carrier for the litterbox and food. You can
> leave him in the carrier overnight. If he is scheduled for surgery
> the next day, he should not be fed the night before, anyway.
>
> You didn't say what kind of carrier you are planning to use. Be
> aware that the cat may panic and rip a soft-sided carrier.
>
> When I trapped Rosie (who was wild and untouchable), I used a humane
> trap in the evening and put her, still in the trap, in the dry tub
> in the bathroom. If she had to do any business, if you know what I
> mean, it wouldn't hurt anything. I closed the shower curtain and
> bathroom door.
>
> The next morning, I took the trap, covered with a towel and with the
> cat inside, to the vet. I took a hard-sided carrier to the vet so
> that I would have something to bring her home in. The vet would be
> able to put her in the carrier before she woke up.
>
> Good luck with your plan.
>
> Annie

To add to what Annie said: In Dec. '05 I
caught a stray and put her in a hard plastic
carrier, around 5 PM. I took her to our vet
the next day at 7:30 AM. She spent the night
in the carrier. I know she didn't like it, but she
was hard to get into the carrier in the first
place and I didn't want to risk her getting loose.

I put a cardboard "tray" (cut down a box) in
the carrier and in that a bunch of shredded
newspaper. That worked as a litter box and
could be tossed out later with minimal cleaning
of the carrier needed.

She did just fine. Two days after her surgery
I was ready to release her back into the wild
of our neighborhood, and she flat refused to
leave! Melosa's still with us, still refuses to go
anywhere near the outdoors. I think her
overnight in the dreaded carrier didn't harm
her in the slightest.

Gail F.

kraut
February 16th 07, 02:26 PM
> I've been betting on the fact that he seems so friendly. Maybe not
> a
> good idea? I really can't keep him in the carrier for the whole
> night.
> It's a big carrier but there would need to be something for a
> litterbox in it.


On occasion when I have caught a stray and had to keep him overnight
so I coyld take to Humane Society or vet the next day I have kept them
in a large plastic carrier overnight.

The ones I have are really large and have room to put a small carboard
box (such as the ones Fancy Feast canned comes in) with litter in it
towards the front and a towel or such towards the back for them to lay
on and they do just fine for a few hours.

dgk
February 16th 07, 04:42 PM
On Fri, 16 Feb 2007 13:26:50 GMT, kraut
> wrote:

>
>> I've been betting on the fact that he seems so friendly. Maybe not
>> a
>> good idea? I really can't keep him in the carrier for the whole
>> night.
>> It's a big carrier but there would need to be something for a
>> litterbox in it.
>
>
>On occasion when I have caught a stray and had to keep him overnight
>so I coyld take to Humane Society or vet the next day I have kept them
>in a large plastic carrier overnight.
>
>The ones I have are really large and have room to put a small carboard
>box (such as the ones Fancy Feast canned comes in) with litter in it
>towards the front and a towel or such towards the back for them to lay
>on and they do just fine for a few hours.
>

Thanks to all. I just freaked over the neuter charge, which will be
around $150! Yikes. I'm looking for cheaper alternatives but what I've
found so far isn't too convenient. I hadn't planned to spend $300,
which is what it will be with the shots and tests.

Still, we start with a Fancy Feast tray of litter in the carrier. It
should fit. Thanks for the idea.

Rene S.
February 16th 07, 10:34 PM
> Thanks to all. I just freaked over the neuter charge, which will be
> around $150! Yikes. I'm looking for cheaper alternatives but what I've
> found so far isn't too convenient. I hadn't planned to spend $300,
> which is what it will be with the shots and tests.
>
> Still, we start with a Fancy Feast tray of litter in the carrier. It
> should fit. Thanks for the idea.

Do you have an animal shelter near you? They will often do spays and
neuters for a lower cost. They can probably do some basic tests and
vaccines too.

Lynne
February 17th 07, 12:29 AM
on Fri, 16 Feb 2007 21:34:40 GMT, "Rene S." >
wrote:

> Do you have an animal shelter near you? They will often do spays and
> neuters for a lower cost. They can probably do some basic tests and
> vaccines too.

The local Humane Society is a good place to ask. They will do neuters here
for $35 or $45 I think. It used to just be for low income families and/or
TNRs, but now they will do that for everyone. I didn't take advantage of
this for Levi, but would have for a healthy cat without hesitation.

--
Lynne