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Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
February 16th 07, 04:36 PM
Hi all,

Sylvester's mom here again. I was wondering if any of you have long
haired cats and if you ever attempt to shave them yourself.

Bonnie, my 18 year old female, is getting increasingly matted, despite
daily brushing with a slicker brush and/or comb. Her coat seems to be
more mat-prone as she ages. It is very fine, with an undercoat, and
sticks together something awful. I think she might feel a lot better if
I shaved her. I took scissors to her long coat last summer because our
A/C went out and she was so hot - she looked awful, but she was
scampering around afterward and I think she liked it.

I cannot take her to a groomer - unlike sweetie-pie Sylvester, she is
NASTY with anybody but me. The vet can barely handle her. She bites,
scratches, you name it. The vet said that he would not recommend trying
to have them, or a groomer, shave her because it would stress her too
much. He also thinks that at her age, the risk of sedating her is not
worth taking just to shave her.

I tried shaving her myself with the electric clipper I use on my horse's
whiskers and bridle paths (manes) and her hair just bogged the clippers
down and we got nowhere. My clippers have a #10 blade I think. She did
sit still for me while I was attempting it though, so I think I could
do it if I had the right tools.

What should I try? A different blade size, entirely new clippers? Or
is there a manual tool of some sort that could cut through her coat in a
uniform manner?

Thanks!
Jennifer
Sylveter and Bonnie

dgk
February 16th 07, 05:07 PM
On Fri, 16 Feb 2007 11:36:57 -0500, Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
> wrote:

>Hi all,
>
>Sylvester's mom here again. I was wondering if any of you have long
>haired cats and if you ever attempt to shave them yourself.
...
>What should I try? A different blade size, entirely new clippers? Or
>is there a manual tool of some sort that could cut through her coat in a
>uniform manner?
>

Maybe someone will know, but how about asking the vet or a groomer
what they use?

22brix
February 16th 07, 05:09 PM
"Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote in message
...
> Hi all,
>
> Sylvester's mom here again. I was wondering if any of you have long
> haired cats and if you ever attempt to shave them yourself.
>
> Bonnie, my 18 year old female, is getting increasingly matted, despite
> daily brushing with a slicker brush and/or comb. Her coat seems to be
> more mat-prone as she ages. It is very fine, with an undercoat, and
> sticks together something awful. I think she might feel a lot better if I
> shaved her. I took scissors to her long coat last summer because our A/C
> went out and she was so hot - she looked awful, but she was scampering
> around afterward and I think she liked it.
>
> I cannot take her to a groomer - unlike sweetie-pie Sylvester, she is
> NASTY with anybody but me. The vet can barely handle her. She bites,
> scratches, you name it. The vet said that he would not recommend trying
> to have them, or a groomer, shave her because it would stress her too
> much. He also thinks that at her age, the risk of sedating her is not
> worth taking just to shave her.
>
> I tried shaving her myself with the electric clipper I use on my horse's
> whiskers and bridle paths (manes) and her hair just bogged the clippers
> down and we got nowhere. My clippers have a #10 blade I think. She did
> sit still for me while I was attempting it though, so I think I could do
> it if I had the right tools.
>
> What should I try? A different blade size, entirely new clippers? Or is
> there a manual tool of some sort that could cut through her coat in a
> uniform manner?
>
> Thanks!
> Jennifer
> Sylveter and Bonnie
>

Hi Jennifer,

I'm not an expert in grooming but I have an Oster dog clipping set with
several different sized blades. I have a cat with long, fine hair that gets
horrible hairballs, even with grooming and hairball treats. I've had to
experiment a bit with the different blades sizes but I have been able to
shave him. I wish I could tell you the size--I can't find the kit right now
and the blade doesn't seem to have the size on it. One thing I find--it
helps to keep the blades well lubricated--my clippers seize up if I don't.
He looks a bit silly but it definitely stops the hairballs. Now only if he
would just sit still. . . You're lucky she'll tolerate the shaving!

You might also ask your vet what type of clipper they would recommend--they
have to shave cats all the time.

Good luck, Bonnie

Buddy's Mom
February 16th 07, 05:32 PM
Hairball treats are to get the hairballs out of their digestive tract
- they do not prevent the cat from getting matted.

On Feb 16, 12:09�pm, "22brix" > wrote:
> "Jennifer Thompson-Fleet" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > Hi all,
>
> > Sylvester's mom here again. *I was wondering if any of you have long
> > haired cats and if you ever attempt to shave them yourself.
>
> > Bonnie, my 18 year old female, is getting increasingly matted, despite
> > daily brushing with a slicker brush and/or comb. *Her coat seems to be
> > more mat-prone as she ages. *It is very fine, with an undercoat, and
> > sticks together something awful. *I think she might feel a lot better if I
> > shaved her. *I took scissors to her long coat last summer because our A/C
> > went out and she was so hot - she looked awful, but she was scampering
> > around afterward and I think she liked it.
>
> > I cannot take her to a groomer - unlike sweetie-pie Sylvester, she is
> > NASTY with anybody but me. *The vet can barely handle her. *She bites,
> > scratches, you name it. *The vet said that he would not recommend trying
> > to have them, or a groomer, shave her because it would stress her too
> > much. *He also thinks that at her age, the risk of sedating her is not
> > worth taking just to shave her.
>
> > I tried shaving her myself with the electric clipper I use on my horse's
> > whiskers and bridle paths (manes) and her hair just bogged the clippers
> > down and we got nowhere. *My clippers have a #10 blade I think. *She did
> > sit still for me while I was attempting it though, so I think I could do
> > it if I had the right tools.
>
> > What should I try? *A different blade size, entirely new clippers? *Or is
> > there a manual tool of some sort that could cut through her coat in a
> > uniform manner?
>
> > Thanks!
> > Jennifer
> > Sylveter and Bonnie
>
> Hi Jennifer,
>
> I'm not an expert in grooming but I have an Oster dog clipping set with
> several different sized blades. *I have a cat with long, fine hair that gets
> horrible hairballs, even with grooming and hairball treats. *I've had to
> experiment a bit with the different blades sizes but I have been able to
> shave him. *I wish I could tell you the size--I can't find the kit right now
> and the blade doesn't seem to have the size on it. *One thing I find--it
> helps to keep the blades well lubricated--my clippers seize up if I don't.
> He looks a bit silly but it definitely stops the hairballs. Now only if he
> would just sit still. . . You're lucky she'll tolerate the shaving!
>
> You might also ask your vet what type of clipper they would recommend--they
> have to shave cats all the time.
>
> Good luck, Bonnie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

22brix
February 16th 07, 05:38 PM
"Buddy's Mom" > wrote in message
oups.com...
Hairball treats are to get the hairballs out of their digestive tract
- they do not prevent the cat from getting matted.

Yes, I realize that--my cat is fortunate enough not to get matted but he
does get hairballs even with brushing and hairball treats. Shaving is about
the only thing that helps prevent hairballs for him.

silvercelt
February 16th 07, 08:00 PM
There are many different blades for grooming, You can get them that
only take the top layer and don't cut straight to the skin. It is
probably more ideal to take her somewhere to be groomed. A lot of
companies (well in UK) will pick them up or groom in your house, which
may be more ideal due to her age and keep stress low. If you attempt
at home make sure you have right equipment and your cat may only
tolerate it for a small amount of time, the sound of the clippers can
stree some cats out. We give our older animals 1/2 a sed rate if we
are unable to do it fully conscious.

Big Al
February 16th 07, 10:00 PM
On Feb 16, 9:36 am, Jennifer Thompson-Fleet >
wrote:
> Hi all,
>
> Sylvester's mom here again. I was wondering if any of you have long
> haired cats and if you ever attempt to shave them yourself.
>
> Bonnie, my 18 year old female, is getting increasingly matted, despite
> daily brushing with a slicker brush and/or comb. Her coat seems to be
> more mat-prone as she ages. It is very fine, with an undercoat, and
> sticks together something awful. I think she might feel a lot better if
> I shaved her. I took scissors to her long coat last summer because our
> A/C went out and she was so hot - she looked awful, but she was
> scampering around afterward and I think she liked it.
>
> I cannot take her to a groomer - unlike sweetie-pie Sylvester, she is
> NASTY with anybody but me. The vet can barely handle her. She bites,
> scratches, you name it. The vet said that he would not recommend trying
> to have them, or a groomer, shave her because it would stress her too
> much. He also thinks that at her age, the risk of sedating her is not
> worth taking just to shave her.
>
> I tried shaving her myself with the electric clipper I use on my horse's
> whiskers and bridle paths (manes) and her hair just bogged the clippers
> down and we got nowhere. My clippers have a #10 blade I think. She did
> sit still for me while I was attempting it though, so I think I could
> do it if I had the right tools.
>
> What should I try? A different blade size, entirely new clippers? Or
> is there a manual tool of some sort that could cut through her coat in a
> uniform manner?
>
> Thanks!
> Jennifer
> Sylveter and Bonnie

Hi - I have not had this problem with my cat(s), but we did need to
shave around my dog's ears once. (She had an infection, and the ear
drops caused a matted mess around her ear.) I used my husband's beard
trimmer, with the deepest/widest (?) attachment. You can get that at
Target or such, they come with different depth (?) attachments.

My suggestion is that you start on a body part FAR from your cat's
head and set a goal of getting just one small spot done at a time. My
dog needed to get used to the sound of the trimmer, she initially
responded, um, poorly to having that buzzing right next to her head.

good luck ... and take THAT, Mr. Guacamole Troll, people do like to
spend time reading and talking about shaving cats. (-:

mariib via CatKB.com
February 17th 07, 02:21 AM
Jennifer Thompson-Fleet wrote:
>Hi all,
>
>Sylvester's mom here again. I was wondering if any of you have long
>haired cats and if you ever attempt to shave them yourself.
>
>Bonnie, my 18 year old female, is getting increasingly matted, despite
>daily brushing with a slicker brush and/or comb. Her coat seems to be
>more mat-prone as she ages. It is very fine, with an undercoat, and
>sticks together something awful. I think she might feel a lot better if
>I shaved her. I took scissors to her long coat last summer because our
>A/C went out and she was so hot - she looked awful, but she was
>scampering around afterward and I think she liked it.
>
>I cannot take her to a groomer - unlike sweetie-pie Sylvester, she is
>NASTY with anybody but me. The vet can barely handle her. She bites,
>scratches, you name it. The vet said that he would not recommend trying
>to have them, or a groomer, shave her because it would stress her too
>much. He also thinks that at her age, the risk of sedating her is not
>worth taking just to shave her.
>
>I tried shaving her myself with the electric clipper I use on my horse's
>whiskers and bridle paths (manes) and her hair just bogged the clippers
>down and we got nowhere. My clippers have a #10 blade I think. She did
> sit still for me while I was attempting it though, so I think I could
>do it if I had the right tools.
>
>What should I try? A different blade size, entirely new clippers? Or
>is there a manual tool of some sort that could cut through her coat in a
>uniform manner?
>
>Thanks!
>Jennifer
>Sylveter and Bonnie

Hi Bonnie,
Go ahead & try to shave your cat - from 1970 thru 1985 I had a very sociable
white long-haired part Maine Coon - such long hair on his belly & an enormous
plume of a tail. I used to shave his hair down to about an inch several times
a year. I used animal clippers (dog) & don't remember the blade size. He was
good-natured & allowed me to do anything I wanted to him. Yes he looked
ridiculous each time for a couple weeks because I could never quite do it
evenly so there were valleys & ridges when freshly shaved. But within a
couple weeks he just looked like a typical domestic short-haired cat.

If you go to webshots - www.webshots.com & look up the link
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2425497350050028271GAZjTw
or if that link doesn't work, on the webshots main page, search for mariib &
the album "beloved past cats gone to the rainbow bridge" & look for pictures
of Tommy - you'll see an old picture of my white cat Tommy a couple weeks
after a shaving in 1971. He was such a gentle sweet-natured boy!
M.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

---MIKE---
February 17th 07, 12:22 PM
Here is what Tiger looked like after the vet shaved him. His hair has
grown back now.

http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/View?u=1777604&a=13746150&p=74482309&Sequence=0&res=high


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Jennifer Thompson-Fleet
February 17th 07, 03:39 PM
Awwwww.....he looks cute. :)

Jennifer

---MIKE--- wrote:
> Here is what Tiger looked like after the vet shaved him. His hair has
> grown back now.
>
> http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/View?u=1777604&a=13746150&p=74482309&Sequence=0&res=high
>
>
> ---MIKE---
>
>>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>>
> >> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
>

sheelagh
February 17th 07, 06:09 PM
On 17 Feb, 15:39, Jennifer Thompson-Fleet >
wrote:
> Awwwww.....helooks cute. :)
>
> Jennifer
>
>
>
> ---MIKE--- wrote:
> > Here is what Tiger looked like after the vet shaved him. His hair has
> > grown back now.
>
> >http://albums.photo.epson.com/j/View?u=1777604&a=13746150&p=74482309&...
>
> > ---MIKE---
>
> >>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>
> > >> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Don't worry about it. Do what you need to do for the cats sake.
Last week Lilly, our Birman seal baby had to be shaved left, right &
centre.. ( Litteraly!!) because she had Pyometra. & to get bloods, set
up a drip & operate on her, she had to be shaved almost everywhere
apart from her back.
Yeah, she looks a little odd right now, but it won't last forever. The
vet reassures me that it will all grow back in time, so do what you
know is best for Kittie...That is all that matters really when you
think about it, isn't it?
Best of luck BWT & don't feel bad about it, you are doing it for a
reason;a very good reason too...
S;o)
S;o)

dreamn3d
February 17th 07, 08:56 PM
To> Jennifer &
> Sylveter and Bonnie

I read somewhere that when a cats two front paws are restricted from
freedom {like when bathing them}, they feel really insecure and kind
of freak out. This article showed a pix of the cat standing upright
in a little bucket of warm soapy water, with her two front paws
hanging over the top ledge of the bucket. Sooooo Cute ! So perhaps
if you hold your cat under the tummy when your grooming them, that
would help the cause. Also...maybe the noise of the shaver is a
frightening sound. Maybe if you turned it on for a minute or so and
let them get used to it.