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furrball9
February 20th 07, 02:58 AM
My 7 year old Siamese (Neiman) has had a creatinine level of 2.5 for the past
6 months. BUN is on the high side at 46. Vet says he is 'compensating well'.
Neiman does not have any dental problems but i understand its time to have
his teeth cleaned to avoid dental problems in the future. I am nervous that
the dental process (anesthia, fluids, stress) will take him 'out of
compensation' and cause his kidney function to suffer.

Has anyone ever had a BAD experience during or after a routine dental
cleaning?

cindys
February 20th 07, 12:45 PM
On Feb 19, 8:58 pm, "furrball9" <[email protected]> wrote:
> My 7 year old Siamese (Neiman) has had a creatinine level of 2.5 for the past
> 6 months. BUN is on the high side at 46. Vet says he is 'compensating well'.
> Neiman does not have any dental problems but i understand its time to have
> his teeth cleaned to avoid dental problems in the future. I am nervous that
> the dental process (anesthia, fluids, stress) will take him 'out of
> compensation' and cause his kidney function to suffer.
>
> Has anyone ever had a BAD experience during or after a routine dental
> cleaning?
----------
Someone posted here a few weeks ago about her 14-year-old cat (without
any known medical conditions) who died after a routine dental
cleaning. The vet was not sure what happened. It could have been due
to a bad reaction to the anesthesia or due to something else. The
reality is (and this certainly applies to human beings as well as to
animals), the most dangerous part of any surgical procedure is always
the anesthesia. In an operating room, the surgeon may be the
proverbial "Captain of the ship," but it's the anesthesiologist who's
keeping you alive. There is a risk for any surgical procedure. OTOH,
Neiman is a fairly young cat, and he needs his teeth cleaned, and the
older he is, the greater the risk. The reason he needs his teeth
cleaned is to clear away bacteria, which if not removed could later
enter his bloodstream and damage his internal organs, including his
heart, so there is a good reason to do the cleaning. Have you spoken
to your vet about your concerns regarding Neiman's kidneys? What does
your vet say? (I have a six-year-old cat with no known medical issues
who also needs a dental, and I admit I'm kind of nervous about it,
just because of the anesthesia).
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Spot
February 20th 07, 03:31 PM
Anethesia is hard on a person with kidney disease so I can't imagine that
it's any easier on a cat. In fact they won't put you out unless there is
absolutely no choice because it's just too risky for the kidneys. I
personally would not have them done unless there was a real need to do so.

If they are in good shape now maybe just a change in diet and going with
some of the crunchies designed to help with tarter would help keep them
clean in the future.

Celeste

"furrball9" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> My 7 year old Siamese (Neiman) has had a creatinine level of 2.5 for the
> past
> 6 months. BUN is on the high side at 46. Vet says he is 'compensating
> well'.
> Neiman does not have any dental problems but i understand its time to have
> his teeth cleaned to avoid dental problems in the future. I am nervous
> that
> the dental process (anesthia, fluids, stress) will take him 'out of
> compensation' and cause his kidney function to suffer.
>
> Has anyone ever had a BAD experience during or after a routine dental
> cleaning?
>

furrball9 via CatKB.com
February 20th 07, 04:54 PM
cindys wrote:
>> My 7 year old Siamese (Neiman) has had a creatinine level of 2.5 for the past
>> 6 months. BUN is on the high side at 46. Vet says he is 'compensating well'.
>[quoted text clipped - 5 lines]
>> Has anyone ever had a BAD experience during or after a routine dental
>> cleaning?
>----------
>Someone posted here a few weeks ago about her 14-year-old cat (without
>any known medical conditions) who died after a routine dental
>cleaning. The vet was not sure what happened. It could have been due
>to a bad reaction to the anesthesia or due to something else. The
>reality is (and this certainly applies to human beings as well as to
>animals), the most dangerous part of any surgical procedure is always
>the anesthesia. In an operating room, the surgeon may be the
>proverbial "Captain of the ship," but it's the anesthesiologist who's
>keeping you alive. There is a risk for any surgical procedure. OTOH,
>Neiman is a fairly young cat, and he needs his teeth cleaned, and the
>older he is, the greater the risk. The reason he needs his teeth
>cleaned is to clear away bacteria, which if not removed could later
>enter his bloodstream and damage his internal organs, including his
>heart, so there is a good reason to do the cleaning. Have you spoken
>to your vet about your concerns regarding Neiman's kidneys? What does
>your vet say? (I have a six-year-old cat with no known medical issues
>who also needs a dental, and I admit I'm kind of nervous about it,
>just because of the anesthesia).
>Best regards,
>---Cindy S.

Vet advises to have the cleaning....but this is how they make $$$.
The appt is Saturday but i am thinking of cancelling.....

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Rene S.
February 20th 07, 07:29 PM
> Vet advises to have the cleaning....but this is how they make $$$.
> The appt is Saturday but i am thinking of cancelling.....

Are his teeth bad now--are his gums inflamed? Your original message
said that "it was time," but what was that based on--his actual teeth
or his age?

Might be worth getting a second opinion. Get a copy of his most recent
bloodwork(s) and bring them to another vet.

furrball9 via CatKB.com
February 20th 07, 08:11 PM
Rene S. wrote:
>> Vet advises to have the cleaning....but this is how they make $$$.
>> The appt is Saturday but i am thinking of cancelling.....
>
>Are his teeth bad now--are his gums inflamed? Your original message
>said that "it was time," but what was that based on--his actual teeth
>or his age?
>
>Might be worth getting a second opinion. Get a copy of his most recent
>bloodwork(s) and bring them to another vet.

thanks for the advise. His gums are fine. He doesn't seem to have problems
at all. The teeth are on the yellow-side tho and the vet has been advising a
cleaning for about a year now. I believe his teeth are normal for a 7 year
old cat that had never had them cleaned.

On the other hand, i hate to 'wait' till there is a problem as his creatinine
may be higher and then the risk is greater! Should i get it done now while
the risk is as low as it could be concidering age/health?

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Rene S.
February 20th 07, 08:23 PM
On Feb 20, 1:11 pm, "furrball9 via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> thanks for the advise. His gums are fine. He doesn't seem to have problems
> at all. The teeth are on the yellow-side tho and the vet has been advising a
> cleaning for about a year now. I believe his teeth are normal for a 7 year
> old cat that had never had them cleaned.
>
> On the other hand, i hate to 'wait' till there is a problem as his creatinine
> may be higher and then the risk is greater! Should i get it done now while
> the risk is as low as it could be concidering age/health?

You raise a good point. I've dealt with several vets, most of whom
wanted to make as much money as they could. If his gums aren't red or
inflamed, this isn't a critical issue. Do you brush his teeth at home?
(If not, good idea to start. CET toothbrushes are the best IMHO)

You could always call another vet and give his blood information over
the phone and ask if they think a dental is a good idea. I did this
last year when my cat had pancreatitis and I needed other opinions.

furrball9 via CatKB.com
February 20th 07, 08:38 PM
Rene S. wrote:
>>> thanks for the advise. His gums are fine. He doesn't seem to have problems
>> at all. The teeth are on the yellow-side tho and the vet has been advising a
>[quoted text clipped - 4 lines]
>> may be higher and then the risk is greater! Should i get it done now while
>> the risk is as low as it could be concidering age/health?
>
>You raise a good point. I've dealt with several vets, most of whom
>wanted to make as much money as they could. If his gums aren't red or
>inflamed, this isn't a critical issue. Do you brush his teeth at home?
>(If not, good idea to start. CET toothbrushes are the best IMHO)
>
>You could always call another vet and give his blood information over
>the phone and ask if they think a dental is a good idea. I did this
>last year when my cat had pancreatitis and I needed other opinions.

Neiman wouldn't allow teeth cleaning at home. It would be impossible....he
is too much of a 'control freak'.

2nd opinion seems to be a good idea. I did find a vet however that does the
cleaning without anesthia but i think it would be too tramatizing for Neiman.
The sounds alone of all the equipment would freak him out. I understand
stress is not good for the kidneys too so being under anesthia does have that
benefit.

Neimans breath is noticeable when you get real close to him so that makes me
think it is time for a cleaning....

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