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MoMo via CatKB.com
March 8th 07, 11:58 PM
Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple of
months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
apartment house). He is extremely cuddly and runs right up to you for love
so he obviously belonged to someone at some point. Another kitten showed up
at a neighbor's house around the same time, and is the same age, so the only
thing we can think is that someone's cat had a litter and they dumped the
litter off in the area being that he is human friendly. Every night I come
home from work and he waits for me in the back and we cuddle for a bit, I cry
my eyes out because I cannot take him in as I have two cats of my own and am
worried about disease, and I put him down and come in. Now tonight, I come
home and when I was holding him I noticed that he seems to have an eye
infection. I am thinking of taking him to the vet on Saturday because of
this but is there anything I can do in the meantime? Also, I assume the vet
will give me drops to give him, but I am worried that once he realizes that
he is going to get drops, he is going to stop coming around at night. Please
give me some advice on this as I am going out of mind thinking of this poor
little guy out there. I cannot take him to a shelter as the family
downstairs has somewhat "adopted" him in that they feed him and let him in at
night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they will
not take him to the vet.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Gail
March 9th 07, 12:13 AM
He is not a feral cat. Feral cats are wild. I would take him to the vet and
also see if you can get the kitten adopted. The neighbor hasn't really
adopted him. You can always keep him in a bathroom before he gets clearance
from the vet for health issues.
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6ee57ec3a8c0f@uwe...
> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple
> of
> months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
> apartment house). He is extremely cuddly and runs right up to you for
> love
> so he obviously belonged to someone at some point. Another kitten showed
> up
> at a neighbor's house around the same time, and is the same age, so the
> only
> thing we can think is that someone's cat had a litter and they dumped the
> litter off in the area being that he is human friendly. Every night I
> come
> home from work and he waits for me in the back and we cuddle for a bit, I
> cry
> my eyes out because I cannot take him in as I have two cats of my own and
> am
> worried about disease, and I put him down and come in. Now tonight, I
> come
> home and when I was holding him I noticed that he seems to have an eye
> infection. I am thinking of taking him to the vet on Saturday because of
> this but is there anything I can do in the meantime? Also, I assume the
> vet
> will give me drops to give him, but I am worried that once he realizes
> that
> he is going to get drops, he is going to stop coming around at night.
> Please
> give me some advice on this as I am going out of mind thinking of this
> poor
> little guy out there. I cannot take him to a shelter as the family
> downstairs has somewhat "adopted" him in that they feed him and let him in
> at
> night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they
> will
> not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

MoMo via CatKB.com
March 9th 07, 12:27 AM
That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although that
is becoming harder and harder. I am trying to find a home for him right now
on my own. How long does it take to get results back from the vet as far as
him having leukemia?

Gail wrote:
>He is not a feral cat. Feral cats are wild. I would take him to the vet and
>also see if you can get the kitten adopted. The neighbor hasn't really
>adopted him. You can always keep him in a bathroom before he gets clearance
>from the vet for health issues.
>Gail
>> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple
>> of
>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
>> will
>> not take him to the vet.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Gail
March 9th 07, 12:29 AM
A few days to get results from the vet. Your other cats will be OK. They
will be curious as to who is in the bathroom, but they will be OK. This
kitten deserves a chance for a good home and you are terrific to care.
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6ee5be358967f@uwe...
> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
> won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although
> that
> is becoming harder and harder. I am trying to find a home for him right
> now
> on my own. How long does it take to get results back from the vet as far
> as
> him having leukemia?
>
> Gail wrote:
>>He is not a feral cat. Feral cats are wild. I would take him to the vet
>>and
>>also see if you can get the kitten adopted. The neighbor hasn't really
>>adopted him. You can always keep him in a bathroom before he gets
>>clearance
>>from the vet for health issues.
>>Gail
>>> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A
>>> couple
>>> of
>>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
>>> will
>>> not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

MoMo via CatKB.com
March 9th 07, 12:37 AM
Thank you Gail! I will go outside and find him.

Gail wrote:
>A few days to get results from the vet. Your other cats will be OK. They
>will be curious as to who is in the bathroom, but they will be OK. This
>kitten deserves a chance for a good home and you are terrific to care.
>Gail
>> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
>> won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although
>[quoted text clipped - 18 lines]
>>>> will
>>>> not take him to the vet.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

sheelagh
March 9th 07, 12:48 AM
On 9 Mar, 00:29, "Gail" > wrote:
> A few days to get results from the vet. Your other cats will be OK. They
> will be curious as to who is in the bathroom, but they will be OK. This
> kitten deserves a chance for a good home and you are terrific to care.
> Gail
> "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in messagenews:6ee5be358967f@uwe...
>
>
>
> > That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
> > won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although
> > that
> > is becoming harder and harder. I am trying to find a home for him right
> > now
> > on my own. How long does it take to get results back from the vet as far
> > as
> > him having leukemia?
>
> > Gail wrote:
> >>He is not a feral cat. Feral cats are wild. I would take him to the vet
> >>and
> >>also see if you can get the kitten adopted. The neighbor hasn't really
> >>adopted him. You can always keep him in a bathroom before he gets
> >>clearance
> >>from the vet for health issues.
> >>Gail
> >>> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A
> >>> couple
> >>> of
> >>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
> >>> will
> >>> not take him to the vet.
>
> > --
> > Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

It is such a nice feeling when you hear that someone cares about a
kitty enough to bother taking them to the vet surgery, even though the
cat doesn't belong to them.
I don't see a problem with putting him into isolation anywhere in your
house, just until you get the results back.

Thank you for caring enough to bother to do that for him.
There are just so many people these days that would prefer to cross
the road than even look at the poor little mite

The dream scenario would be that you find out that he is a healthy
perfect puss cat..
If this is not the case, then perhaps you might have to think about
who can take him..
Is it not possible for you to have him, assuming that all the tests
come back clear?
If not, are there any no kill policy shelters in your area?

I don't know what to advise you if you are in the USA..?

Over in the UK, you could have taken him on to the Cat Protection
League, who would have hung on to him until the most worthy slave came
along to love him...
Best of Luck for Saturday, & please do let us know how you got on..?
Thank you!
S;o)

Gail
March 9th 07, 12:48 AM
Keep us posted. He sounds like a little love bug.
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6ee5d3f11b01f@uwe...
> Thank you Gail! I will go outside and find him.
>
> Gail wrote:
>>A few days to get results from the vet. Your other cats will be OK. They
>>will be curious as to who is in the bathroom, but they will be OK. This
>>kitten deserves a chance for a good home and you are terrific to care.
>>Gail
>>> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom,
>>> but
>>> won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although
>>[quoted text clipped - 18 lines]
>>>>> will
>>>>> not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

bookie
March 9th 07, 12:53 AM
On 9 Mar, 00:37, "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote:
> Thank you Gail! I will go outside and find him.
>
> Gail wrote:
> >A few days to get results from the vet. Your other cats will be OK. They
> >will be curious as to who is in the bathroom, but they will be OK. This
> >kitten deserves a chance for a good home and you are terrific to care.
> >Gail
> >> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
> >> won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although
> >[quoted text clipped - 18 lines]
> >>>> will
> >>>> not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com

yes please try to help him, get him , keep him in a room by himself,
your cats will not go mad or have nervous breakdowns just by him being
there for a few days, more important you help this little fellow.
one thing i have worked out from having to pill 2 separate cats twice
a day (present cat jessie and last cat jasper, both hyperthyroid) wa
sthat if you give them a treat or particular favoured bit of food
directly after the pillor treament then they start to associate the
treament with the treat and expect it afterwards and so pilling does
not seem so bad. It is as though i ahve conditioned jessie to link the
pill with an imminent treat now and she went from being outerageously
wild to very easy to medicate now.

it may work, i may not, you certainly have to be consistent with
always giving a treat after the pill or drops, and talk gently to the
kitten while you are doing it. After you have given him the drops
continue to hold him and stroke and talk to him until he calms down
and then let him go so you part on good terms as it were.

best of luck with him and keep us posted, maybe your 2 cats will
accept him and he can become part of the family

bookie

cindys
March 9th 07, 01:00 AM
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6ee5be358967f@uwe...
> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
> won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although
> that
> is becoming harder and harder. I am trying to find a home for him right
> now
> on my own. How long does it take to get results back from the vet as far
> as
> him having leukemia?
------------
When I had Tux tested, it only took about a half hour to get the results.
But the rub is that if the cat has been exposed to leukemia recently (say,
less than two months ago), his body may not have formed the telltale
antibodies yet, which would render a positive test result. Tux came from a
rescue group who had him tested right away. Then, he had been in a foster
home for several months. When I had him tested, it was the second test
(several months after the first test). If I were you, I would have the cat
tested. If the results are negative, he is probably okay, but you do have to
weigh the relative risk of what do you think is the possibility that he had
a cat fight with a leukemia-positive cat within the last two months. The
risk to your own cats is also considerably less if they are vaccinated
against feline leukemia. The vaccination renders 80% protection. Also, even
unvaccinated adult cats are much less vulnerable to acquiring the virus (if
exposed to a leukemia-positive cat) than kittens. Good luck.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.


>
> Gail wrote:
>>He is not a feral cat. Feral cats are wild. I would take him to the vet
>>and
>>also see if you can get the kitten adopted. The neighbor hasn't really
>>adopted him. You can always keep him in a bathroom before he gets
>>clearance
>>from the vet for health issues.
>>Gail
>>> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A
>>> couple
>>> of
>>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
>>> will
>>> not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

Buddy's Mom
March 9th 07, 01:23 AM
Being a kitten - he may just have an upper respiratory infection that
could be remedied by antibiotics.
Go to the vet!!!
On Mar 8, 8:00�pm, "cindys" > wrote:
> "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in messagenews:6ee5be358967f@uwe....> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
> > won't that drive my other cats crazy? *I have to put them first although
> > that
> > is becoming harder and harder. *I am trying to find a home for him right
> > now
> > on my own. *How long does it take to get results back from the vet as far
> > as
> > him having leukemia?
>
> ------------
> When I had Tux tested, it only took about a half hour to get the results.
> But the rub is that if the cat has been exposed to leukemia recently (say,
> less than two months ago), his body may not have formed the telltale
> antibodies yet, which would render a positive test result. Tux came from a
> rescue group who had him tested right away. Then, he had been in a foster
> home for several months. When I had him tested, it was the second test
> (several months after the first test). If I were you, I would have the cat
> tested. If the results are negative, he is probably okay, but you do have to
> weigh the relative risk of what do you think is the possibility that he had
> a cat fight with a leukemia-positive cat within the last two months. The
> risk to your own cats is also considerably less if they are vaccinated
> against feline leukemia. The vaccination renders 80% protection. Also, even
> unvaccinated adult cats are much less vulnerable to acquiring the virus (if
> exposed to a leukemia-positive cat) than kittens. Good luck.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.
>
>
>
>
>
> > Gail wrote:
> >>He is not a feral cat. Feral cats are wild. I would take him to the vet
> >>and
> >>also see if you can get the kitten adopted. The neighbor hasn't really
> >>adopted him. You can always keep him in a bathroom before he gets
> >>clearance
> >>from the vet for health issues.
> >>Gail
> >>> Hi everyone. *I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. *A
> >>> couple
> >>> of
> >>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
> >>> will
> >>> not take him to the vet.
>
> > --
> > Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Lynne
March 9th 07, 01:49 AM
on Fri, 09 Mar 2007 01:23:48 GMT, "Buddy's Mom" > wrote:

> Being a kitten - he may just have an upper respiratory infection that
> could be remedied by antibiotics.
> Go to the vet!!!

That was my first thought.

If the kitten does have a URI, he could fade pretty quickly, so please do
get him to a vet ASAP.

--
Lynne

Cheryl
March 9th 07, 02:22 AM
On Thu 08 Mar 2007 07:27:19p, MoMo via CatKB.com wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav <news:6ee5be358967f@uwe>:

>
> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra
> bedroom, but won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to
> put them first although that is becoming harder and harder. I
> am trying to find a home for him right now on my own. How long
> does it take to get results back from the vet as far as him
> having leukemia?

The "SNAP" test is instant, and you'll know before you leave the
vets office if he tests positive to feline aids or feline leukemia.
Please know that a positive result on the instant test isn't a true
result, and there's another test, the IFA that will confirm if the
SNAP is positive. The IFA will take a few days to get the results,
but again, only if the instant test indicates positive. Also, some
poeple will get the feline aids vaccine, so the cat will always
test positive if that vaccine was given.

All that said, I have a "true feral" that I took in, and she lived
in my downstairs bathroom for 2 full weeks before I let her into
another room. She had a bad respiratory infection and needed to
clear that before coming out of that bathroom. Being a feral, she
really only wanted to hide in dark places during that time, and it
didn't traumatize her. After that it was another few weeks in a
cage (with the cage door open) in my spare bedroom, then the cage
was moved to the living room so my other cats could get to know
her, and vise versa.

When Bonnie was in the bathroom, my other cats barely knew she was
even here. Like you, I had no choice. It was either a dangerous
life, or a slow introduction to an indoor, safe life. What would
you choose?

Good luck!

--
Cheryl

Cheryl
March 9th 07, 02:30 AM
On Thu 08 Mar 2007 08:00:06p, cindys wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> When I had Tux tested, it only took about a half hour to get the
> results. But the rub is that if the cat has been exposed to
> leukemia recently (say, less than two months ago), his body may
> not have formed the telltale antibodies yet, which would render
> a positive test result. Tux came from a rescue group who had him
> tested right away. Then, he had been in a foster home for
> several months. When I had him tested, it was the second test
> (several months after the first test). If I were you, I would
> have the cat tested. If the results are negative, he is probably
> okay, but you do have to weigh the relative risk of what do you
> think is the possibility that he had a cat fight with a
> leukemia-positive cat within the last two months. The risk to
> your own cats is also considerably less if they are vaccinated
> against feline leukemia. The vaccination renders 80% protection.
> Also, even unvaccinated adult cats are much less vulnerable to
> acquiring the virus (if exposed to a leukemia-positive cat) than
> kittens. Good luck.
>

I wouldn't recommend the FeLV vaccine unless there are serious
risks to not do so. I had a FeLV+ cat (infected from a blood
transfusion) and when that happened, I had my other two cats
vaccinated. The vaccination isn't instant; they have to build up
antibodies, so if they could all live together after the first was
infected, it seems to confirm to me that passing the virus cat-to-
adult-cat is harder than what some vets and web site say. Both
cats never contracted the virus even though they shared
litterboxes, food bowls and water bowls. This isn't to say not to
take precautions, but it seems harder to transmit than most think.
So I guess I'm saying I wouldn't vaccinate unless I knew the
possibly exposed kitty was definitely positive. The vaccination
comes with its own risks.

--
Cheryl

cindys
March 9th 07, 02:57 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...

>>
>
> I wouldn't recommend the FeLV vaccine unless there are serious
> risks to not do so. I had a FeLV+ cat (infected from a blood
> transfusion) and when that happened, I had my other two cats
> vaccinated. The vaccination isn't instant; they have to build up
> antibodies, so if they could all live together after the first was
> infected, it seems to confirm to me that passing the virus cat-to-
> adult-cat is harder than what some vets and web site say.

This is absolutely true. I learned from the internet that the virus is not
terribly contagious even to nonvaccinated adult cats. OTOH, it is much more
dangerous for kittens who are at much greater risk of acquiring the virus if
exposed.

>Both
> cats never contracted the virus even though they shared
> litterboxes, food bowls and water bowls. This isn't to say not to
> take precautions, but it seems harder to transmit than most think.
> So I guess I'm saying I wouldn't vaccinate unless I knew the
> possibly exposed kitty was definitely positive. The vaccination
> comes with its own risks.
>
Back in 1981, I lost a cat to feline leukemia. His mother was a stray who
had wandered into someone's garage and given birth. A friend picked him up
for me after having seen a newspaper ad that was advertising "free kittens."
At any rate, we had Mackie for five years. At some point, our vet advised us
that he needed a dental. One day, about six months after the dental, I
noticed that Mackie had some chest congestion. The vet diagnosed a
respiratory infection and put him on antibiotics. Mackie continued to go
downhill and three weeks later, we had to have him euthanized. If I had it
to do again, I would have had him euthanized sooner, that's how rapidly he
declined. We waited at least a week too long. The vet told us he thought it
was likely Mackie had succumbed to feline leukemia. For years, I was
convinced Mackie had somehow been exposed to a an FeLV+ cat in the
veterinary office when he went for his dental. (Mackie was strictly indoors
and an only cat). It wasn't until many years later, it was explained to me
that he had probably acquired the infection from his mother and been a
carrier for all those years. At any rate, the year after Mackie died, the
feline leukemia vaccine became available. So, this is the reason I am so
paranoid about feline leukemia and obsessed with the idea of giving cats the
vaccine (even if the likelihood of their acquiring FeLV is very low).
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Lynne
March 9th 07, 03:04 AM
on Fri, 09 Mar 2007 02:57:09 GMT, "cindys" >
wrote:

> Back in 1981, I lost a cat to feline leukemia. His mother was a stray
> who had wandered into someone's garage and given birth. A friend
> picked him up for me after having seen a newspaper ad that was
> advertising "free kittens." At any rate, we had Mackie for five years.
> At some point, our vet advised us that he needed a dental. One day,
> about six months after the dental, I noticed that Mackie had some
> chest congestion. The vet diagnosed a respiratory infection and put
> him on antibiotics. Mackie continued to go downhill and three weeks
> later, we had to have him euthanized. If I had it to do again, I would
> have had him euthanized sooner, that's how rapidly he declined. We
> waited at least a week too long. The vet told us he thought it was
> likely Mackie had succumbed to feline leukemia. For years, I was
> convinced Mackie had somehow been exposed to a an FeLV+ cat in the
> veterinary office when he went for his dental. (Mackie was strictly
> indoors and an only cat). It wasn't until many years later, it was
> explained to me that he had probably acquired the infection from his
> mother and been a carrier for all those years. At any rate, the year
> after Mackie died, the feline leukemia vaccine became available. So,
> this is the reason I am so paranoid about feline leukemia and obsessed
> with the idea of giving cats the vaccine (even if the likelihood of
> their acquiring FeLV is very low).

I don't blame you, that must have been awful.

My 3 year old is vaccinated, but I don't know what I will do with Levi.
I had him tested and he was negative, thank goodness. With his FHV, I'm
not sure I want to stress his immune system with too many vaccines.
Since Rudy is negative and protected and they are both indoors-only, I
probably won't get Levi vaccinated for FeLV. OTOH, if I had another cat
who was FeLV posititive, I absolutely would. Sure, it's not transmitted
very easily, but my boys rough house and sometimes they sink teeth and
claws into each other. If one of them was positive, that would be too
high of a risk. It may only take one bite...

--
Lynne

Wendy
March 9th 07, 03:14 AM
The test should take 20 minutes to run tops. They should be able to do it in
the office while you wait.



"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6ee5be358967f@uwe...
> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
> won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to put them first although
> that
> is becoming harder and harder. I am trying to find a home for him right
> now
> on my own. How long does it take to get results back from the vet as far
> as
> him having leukemia?
>
> Gail wrote:
>>He is not a feral cat. Feral cats are wild. I would take him to the vet
>>and
>>also see if you can get the kitten adopted. The neighbor hasn't really
>>adopted him. You can always keep him in a bathroom before he gets
>>clearance
>>from the vet for health issues.
>>Gail
>>> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A
>>> couple
>>> of
>>[quoted text clipped - 30 lines]
>>> will
>>> not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

Wendy
March 9th 07, 03:19 AM
Well not quite instant. I think you have to wait 10 minutes for the results.

W.


"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> On Thu 08 Mar 2007 07:27:19p, MoMo via CatKB.com wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav <news:6ee5be358967f@uwe>:
>
>>
>> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra
>> bedroom, but won't that drive my other cats crazy? I have to
>> put them first although that is becoming harder and harder. I
>> am trying to find a home for him right now on my own. How long
>> does it take to get results back from the vet as far as him
>> having leukemia?
>
> The "SNAP" test is instant, and you'll know before you leave the
> vets office if he tests positive to feline aids or feline leukemia.
> Please know that a positive result on the instant test isn't a true
> result, and there's another test, the IFA that will confirm if the
> SNAP is positive. The IFA will take a few days to get the results,
> but again, only if the instant test indicates positive. Also, some
> poeple will get the feline aids vaccine, so the cat will always
> test positive if that vaccine was given.
>
> All that said, I have a "true feral" that I took in, and she lived
> in my downstairs bathroom for 2 full weeks before I let her into
> another room. She had a bad respiratory infection and needed to
> clear that before coming out of that bathroom. Being a feral, she
> really only wanted to hide in dark places during that time, and it
> didn't traumatize her. After that it was another few weeks in a
> cage (with the cage door open) in my spare bedroom, then the cage
> was moved to the living room so my other cats could get to know
> her, and vise versa.
>
> When Bonnie was in the bathroom, my other cats barely knew she was
> even here. Like you, I had no choice. It was either a dangerous
> life, or a slow introduction to an indoor, safe life. What would
> you choose?
>
> Good luck!
>
> --
> Cheryl
>
>

Phil P.
March 9th 07, 05:26 AM
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6ee57ec3a8c0f@uwe...
> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple
of
> months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
> apartment house). He is extremely cuddly and runs right up to you for
love
> so he obviously belonged to someone at some point. Another kitten showed
up
> at a neighbor's house around the same time, and is the same age, so the
only
> thing we can think is that someone's cat had a litter and they dumped the
> litter off in the area being that he is human friendly. Every night I
come
> home from work and he waits for me in the back and we cuddle for a bit, I
cry
> my eyes out because I cannot take him in as I have two cats of my own and
am
> worried about disease, and I put him down and come in. Now tonight, I
come
> home and when I was holding him I noticed that he seems to have an eye
> infection. I am thinking of taking him to the vet on Saturday because of
> this but is there anything I can do in the meantime? Also, I assume the
vet
> will give me drops to give him, but I am worried that once he realizes
that
> he is going to get drops, he is going to stop coming around at night.
Please
> give me some advice on this as I am going out of mind thinking of this
poor
> little guy out there. I cannot take him to a shelter as the family
> downstairs has somewhat "adopted" him in that they feed him and let him in
at
> night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they
will
> not take him to the vet.

If he comes inside voluntarily and allows human handling, he's not feral.
He was probably dumped.

Get him tested or FeLV and FIV, wormed and let the vet take a look at his
eye. Then bring him in and begin the introduction process.

Phil

Phil P.
March 9th 07, 05:26 AM
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
> But the rub is that if the cat has been exposed to leukemia recently (say,
> less than two months ago), his body may not have formed the telltale
> antibodies yet, which would render a positive test result.

The FeLV test tests for antigen not antibodies. The in-house ELISA Snap Test
can detect circulating antigen in about 2-4 weeks. A positive test result
does not mean the cat has a persistent infection. Most cats over 4 months
extinguish the virus in the early stages and become immune. That's why all
ELISA positives should be confirmed with the IFA assay before any decisions
are made.

The FIV ELISA tests for antibodies. It takes about 8-12 weeks after
infection for antibodies to develop. However- kittens < 6-8 months can test
positive without being infected if they received antibodies from their
mother during nursing.

Phil.

Phil P.
March 9th 07, 05:29 AM
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6ee5be358967f@uwe...
> That is what I was thinking of doing, locking him in an extra bedroom, but
> won't that drive my other cats crazy?

Not if you introduce him slowly-- one sense at a time.
http://maxshouse.com/introducing_cats.htm


I have to put them first although that
> is becoming harder and harder. I am trying to find a home for him right
now
> on my own. How long does it take to get results back from the vet as far
as
> him having leukemia?

10 minutes. The FeLV and FIV are both in-house tests.

Phil

ritzykatz
March 9th 07, 09:24 AM
That kitten probably has an upper respiratory infection. It spreads very
quickly and in some instances, could create future health problems.
MoMo wrote:
>Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple of
>months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
>apartment house). He is extremely cuddly and runs right up to you for love
>so he obviously belonged to someone at some point. Another kitten showed up
>at a neighbor's house around the same time, and is the same age, so the only
>thing we can think is that someone's cat had a litter and they dumped the
>litter off in the area being that he is human friendly. Every night I come
>home from work and he waits for me in the back and we cuddle for a bit, I cry
>my eyes out because I cannot take him in as I have two cats of my own and am
>worried about disease, and I put him down and come in. Now tonight, I come
>home and when I was holding him I noticed that he seems to have an eye
>infection. I am thinking of taking him to the vet on Saturday because of
>this but is there anything I can do in the meantime? Also, I assume the vet
>will give me drops to give him, but I am worried that once he realizes that
>he is going to get drops, he is going to stop coming around at night. Please
>give me some advice on this as I am going out of mind thinking of this poor
>little guy out there. I cannot take him to a shelter as the family
>downstairs has somewhat "adopted" him in that they feed him and let him in at
>night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they will
>not take him to the vet.

MoMo via CatKB.com
March 9th 07, 02:36 PM
I was unable to find him again last night, so my neighbor's had probably
already taken him in for the night and the same thing this morning. If and
when he greets me tonight I will bring him in and take him to the vet in the
morning for his eye and his shots. Unfortunately I cannot keep him, although
I have already fell in love with him. I already have two cats in an
apartment and my landlord would not be pleased with a third. I am working
hard to find this beautiful boy a home ASAP. I will try and post pics if I
can figure out how to do that :) Thank you all for your responses.

ritzykatz wrote:
>That kitten probably has an upper respiratory infection. It spreads very
>quickly and in some instances, could create future health problems.
>>Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple of
>>months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
>[quoted text clipped - 16 lines]
>>night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they will
>>not take him to the vet.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200703/1

Gail
March 9th 07, 02:50 PM
Let us know what happens. Again, you are terrific to help him.
Gail
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6eed2747fb7f3@uwe...
>I was unable to find him again last night, so my neighbor's had probably
> already taken him in for the night and the same thing this morning. If
> and
> when he greets me tonight I will bring him in and take him to the vet in
> the
> morning for his eye and his shots. Unfortunately I cannot keep him,
> although
> I have already fell in love with him. I already have two cats in an
> apartment and my landlord would not be pleased with a third. I am working
> hard to find this beautiful boy a home ASAP. I will try and post pics if
> I
> can figure out how to do that :) Thank you all for your responses.
>
> ritzykatz wrote:
>>That kitten probably has an upper respiratory infection. It spreads very
>>quickly and in some instances, could create future health problems.
>>>Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple
>>>of
>>>months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a
>>>three
>>[quoted text clipped - 16 lines]
>>>night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they
>>>will
>>>not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200703/1
>

zinzee
March 12th 07, 05:52 AM
You can email them to me and I will post them on my website. E-mail them to
if you'd like.

Best,
Heather

"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6eed2747fb7f3@uwe...
>I was unable to find him again last night, so my neighbor's had probably
> already taken him in for the night and the same thing this morning. If
> and
> when he greets me tonight I will bring him in and take him to the vet in
> the
> morning for his eye and his shots. Unfortunately I cannot keep him,
> although
> I have already fell in love with him. I already have two cats in an
> apartment and my landlord would not be pleased with a third. I am working
> hard to find this beautiful boy a home ASAP. I will try and post pics if
> I
> can figure out how to do that :) Thank you all for your responses.
>
> ritzykatz wrote:
>>That kitten probably has an upper respiratory infection. It spreads very
>>quickly and in some instances, could create future health problems.
>>>Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple
>>>of
>>>months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a
>>>three
>>[quoted text clipped - 16 lines]
>>>night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they
>>>will
>>>not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.com
> http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200703/1
>

IBen Getiner
March 12th 07, 07:55 AM
On Mar 8, 6:58�pm, "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote:
> Hi everyone. *I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. *A couple of
> months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
> apartment house). *He is extremely cuddly and runs right up to you for love
> so he obviously belonged to someone at some point. *Another kitten showed up
> at a neighbor's house around the same time, and is the same age, so the only
> thing we can think is that someone's cat had a litter and they dumped the
> litter off in the area being that he is human friendly. *Every night I come
> home from work and he waits for me in the back and we cuddle for a bit, I cry
> my eyes out because I cannot take him in as I have two cats of my own and am
> worried about disease, and I put him down and come in. *Now tonight, I come
> home and when I was holding him I noticed that he seems to have an eye
> infection. *I am thinking of taking him to the vet on Saturday because of
> this but is there anything I can do in the meantime? *Also, I assume the vet
> will give me drops to give him, but I am worried that once he realizes that
> he is going to get drops, he is going to stop coming around at night. *Please
> give me some advice on this as I am going out of mind thinking of this poor
> little guy out there. *I cannot take him to a shelter as the family
> downstairs has somewhat "adopted" him in that they feed him and let him in at
> night to sleep and their kids are attached to him but I know that they will
> not take him to the vet.
>
> --
> Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com

Why don't you just take him in and expose your other cats to the risk?
You're going to do that eventually anyway. You're obviously the over-
emotional type. The "Who cares about the long-term the whole, just so
long as we can fill the needs of the one TODAY! type. The "our
government will probably have scientists working on the problem and
they'll have a solution for us before our time comes" type.
Right....?
I know that's the way you think. You are a person of faith, not of
reason. So by any and all means, please... PRO-SEED.
Sheeeesh... Un-****in'-believable. Surrounded by childlike morons at
each and every turn anymore. No one under the ago of 70 with any
maturity. What an ugly self-centered world you 60s fools have birthed.


IBen Getiner

MoMo via CatKB.com
March 12th 07, 01:44 PM
Wow, sounds like IBen woke up on the wrong side of the bed :)

Thank you zinzee!. I will hopefully get pics of him tonight when I see him
and I will email them over to you. What is your website?

I did not see him over this weekend but spoke with my neighbors who had him
inside and they said that his eye is fine. Hopefully he had just gotten
something in it and worked it out.

Thanks again everyone for all of your advice and input and I will keep you
all posted!

IBen Getiner wrote:
>> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple of
>> months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
>[quoted text clipped - 19 lines]
>> --
>> Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com
>
>Why don't you just take him in and expose your other cats to the risk?
>You're going to do that eventually anyway. You're obviously the over-
>emotional type. The "Who cares about the long-term the whole, just so
>long as we can fill the needs of the one TODAY! type. The "our
>government will probably have scientists working on the problem and
>they'll have a solution for us before our time comes" type.
> Right....?
>I know that's the way you think. You are a person of faith, not of
>reason. So by any and all means, please... PRO-SEED.
>Sheeeesh... Un-****in'-believable. Surrounded by childlike morons at
>each and every turn anymore. No one under the ago of 70 with any
>maturity. What an ugly self-centered world you 60s fools have birthed.
>
>IBen Getiner

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

IBen Getiner
March 15th 07, 08:35 AM
On Mar 12, 8:44�am, "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote:
> Wow, sounds like IBen woke up on the wrong side of the bed :)
>
> Thank you zinzee!. *I will hopefully get pics of him tonight when I see him
> and I will email them over to you. *What is your website?
>
> I did not see him over this weekend but spoke with my neighbors who had him
> inside and they said that his eye is fine. *Hopefully he had just gotten
> something in it and worked it out. *
>
> Thanks again everyone for all of your advice and input and I will keep you
> all posted!
>
>
>
>
>
> IBen Getinerwrote:
> >> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple of
> >> months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
> >[quoted text clipped - 19 lines]
> >> --
> >> Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com
>
> >Why don't you just take him in and expose your other cats to the risk?
> >You're going to do that eventually anyway. You're obviously *the over-
> >emotional type. The "Who cares about the long-term the whole, just so
> >long as we can fill the needs of the one TODAY! type. The "our
> >government will probably have scientists working on the problem and
> >they'll have a solution for us before our time comes" type.
> > Right....?
> >I know that's the way you think. You are a person of faith, not of
> >reason. So by any and all means, please... PRO-SEED.
> >Sheeeesh... Un-****in'-believable. Surrounded by childlike morons at
> >each and every turn anymore. No one under the ago of 70 with any
> >maturity. What an ugly self-centered world you 60s fools have birthed.
>
> >IBen Getiner
>
> --
> Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

A happy-face person. How could I have known...? No getting thru that.
But what the hey... There's only one brain cell behind that positive
shellac-job anyway..



IBen

rwalker@despammed.com
March 15th 07, 11:43 PM
On Mar 15, 4:35 am, "IBen Getiner" > wrote:
> On Mar 12, 8:44?am, "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Wow, sounds like IBen woke up on the wrong side of the bed :)
>
> > Thank you zinzee!. ?I will hopefully get pics of him tonight when I see him
> > and I will email them over to you. ?What is your website?
>
> > I did not see him over this weekend but spoke with my neighbors who had him
> > inside and they said that his eye is fine. ?Hopefully he had just gotten
> > something in it and worked it out. ?
>
> > Thanks again everyone for all of your advice and input and I will keep you
> > all posted!
>
> > IBen Getinerwrote:
> > >> Hi everyone. I am hoping someone here can give me some advice. A couple of
> > >> months ago a beautiful kitten showed up in our backyard (I live in a three
> > >[quoted text clipped - 19 lines]
> > >> --
> > >> Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com
>
> > >Why don't you just take him in and expose your other cats to the risk?
> > >You're going to do that eventually anyway. You're obviously ?the over-
> > >emotional type. The "Who cares about the long-term the whole, just so
> > >long as we can fill the needs of the one TODAY! type. The "our
> > >government will probably have scientists working on the problem and
> > >they'll have a solution for us before our time comes" type.
> > > Right....?
> > >I know that's the way you think. You are a person of faith, not of
> > >reason. So by any and all means, please... PRO-SEED.
> > >Sheeeesh... Un-****in'-believable. Surrounded by childlike morons at
> > >each and every turn anymore. No one under the ago of 70 with any
> > >maturity. What an ugly self-centered world you 60s fools have birthed.
>
> > >IBen Getiner
>
> > --
> > Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com-Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> A happy-face person. How could I have known...? No getting thru that.
> But what the hey... There's only one brain cell behind that positive
> shellac-job anyway..
>
> IBen- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Attempting to terrorize cat lovers now, big man? You stupid ****.

Terry O'Connel
March 19th 07, 10:39 AM
IBen Getiner wrote:
> Sheeeesh... Un-****in'-believable. Surrounded by childlike morons at
> each and every turn anymore. No one under the ago of 70 with any
> maturity. What an ugly self-centered world you 60s fools have birthed.
>
>
> IBen Getiner
>

You're the only childlike moron here, criticizing other people for
grammar errors and spelling errors while you can't even write English
yourself.