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March 11th 07, 07:52 PM
Hello,
I'm looking to solicit some advice concerning adopting a cat.
Here's the situation I am currently in.
-I have never owned a cat before in my entire life. We've always had
dogs, and I always thought I wouldn't have the patience to walk
something every day, I don't think the other tenants in the building
would appreciate the barking, and most importantly, I'm allergic to
dogs (but not cats, I checked)
- I live by myself in a fairly roomy apartment, which is essentially
the top floor and attic of an old house, so there would not be any
shortage of room.
- My dad is deathly allergic to cats, he never does visit anyways, but
my concern is when I go to visit them, if any residual allergens may
stick to my clothes etc.
- I have a terrarium with a reptile in it, although I'm quite sure
that the lid is secure. It's a metal cage that even I have trouble
getting off.
- I'd like to adopt a cat from a nearby shelter, mostly because I
doubt I'd have the time to properly litter train a cat, coupled with
the fact that I don't know How to litter train a cat, which I could
see posing an even larger problem.

My questions are as follows...

Is there anything one needs to do to train an adopted cat, like show
them the litter box, leave them in the room with it overnight etc.?
I hear a lot about having two cats at the least, so they don't get
bored, any thoughts?
Is there any benefits to adopting over raising from birth?
If one gets an already grown cat declawed, is that especialy cruel, or
is that just an opinion thing, because I've heard both sides to that
story.
There was an incident in this house several years ago where the
previous tenant had a bunch of cats who peed all over the place in
this little room in the attic, is that going to cause problems, with
males especially, or would I need to stick to a female to avoid
additional stink.
and finally,
Is the allergen risk to my dad too high for me to even consider this?

Any help that can be provided would be greatly appreciated

-dorje

John Ross Mc Master
March 11th 07, 08:14 PM
On 11 Mar 2007 12:52:26 -0700, wrote:

>Hello,
>I'm looking to solicit some advice concerning adopting a cat.
>Here's the situation I am currently in.
>-I have never owned a cat before in my entire life. We've always had
>dogs, and I always thought I wouldn't have the patience to walk
>something every day, I don't think the other tenants in the building
>would appreciate the barking, and most importantly, I'm allergic to
>dogs (but not cats, I checked)
>- I live by myself in a fairly roomy apartment, which is essentially
>the top floor and attic of an old house, so there would not be any
>shortage of room.
>- My dad is deathly allergic to cats, he never does visit anyways, but
>my concern is when I go to visit them, if any residual allergens may
>stick to my clothes etc.
>- I have a terrarium with a reptile in it, although I'm quite sure
>that the lid is secure. It's a metal cage that even I have trouble
>getting off.
>- I'd like to adopt a cat from a nearby shelter, mostly because I
>doubt I'd have the time to properly litter train a cat, coupled with
>the fact that I don't know How to litter train a cat, which I could
>see posing an even larger problem.
>
>My questions are as follows...
>
>Is there anything one needs to do to train an adopted cat, like show
>them the litter box, leave them in the room with it overnight etc.?

Leave them in the room with the litter box. Place the food and water
at least 6 feet or more from the litterbox.
>I hear a lot about having two cats at the least, so they don't get
>bored, any thoughts?
Adopt a solitary cat. I work in a shelter and we know their
personalities well enough to tell who likes being alone.
>Is there any benefits to adopting over raising from birth?
You know what you're getting if you adopt.
>If one gets an already grown cat declawed, is that especialy cruel, or
>is that just an opinion thing, because I've heard both sides to that
>story.
NEVER declaw a cat. It is very cruel.
>There was an incident in this house several years ago where the
>previous tenant had a bunch of cats who peed all over the place in
>this little room in the attic, is that going to cause problems, with
>males especially, or would I need to stick to a female to avoid
>additional stink.
If the male was neutered before 6 months of age he probably won't
spray.
>and finally,
>Is the allergen risk to my dad too high for me to even consider this?
Go to a shelter and play with some cats, then visit your father. If he
has a reaction, don't adopt a cat.
>
>Any help that can be provided would be greatly appreciated
>
>-dorje

Gail Futoran
March 12th 07, 12:00 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello,
> I'm looking to solicit some advice concerning adopting a cat.
> Here's the situation I am currently in.
> -I have never owned a cat before in my entire life. We've always had
> dogs, and I always thought I wouldn't have the patience to walk
> something every day, I don't think the other tenants in the building
> would appreciate the barking, and most importantly, I'm allergic to
> dogs (but not cats, I checked)
> - I live by myself in a fairly roomy apartment, which is essentially
> the top floor and attic of an old house, so there would not be any
> shortage of room.
> - My dad is deathly allergic to cats, he never does visit anyways,
> but
> my concern is when I go to visit them, if any residual allergens may
> stick to my clothes etc.

I'm not sure what you mean by "deathly allergic"
but I've spent time with friends and relatives who
are normally allergic (can't be in the same house
as a cat) and they have no problem with me.
You can always take a shower and put on
fresh clothes (not accessible to the cat) and not
play with the cat before going to visit your dad. :)
It's the dander that produces the allergic
reaction. My sister, who is sufficiently allergic
to cats that she can't own one, has stayed at
my house but I kept the cats out of the guest
bedroom and ran a filter in there, and vacuumed
religiously before she arrived.

> - I have a terrarium with a reptile in it, although I'm quite sure
> that the lid is secure. It's a metal cage that even I have trouble
> getting off.

If the terrarium is large enough that a cat can't
knock it off a shelf, and the lid is as secure as
you say it is, I wouldn't worry about it. I have
tropical fish tanks and two of my cats love
to "chase" the fish and will dip their paws in
the water if I leave the lid up, but they've
never figured out how to open the lids.

> - I'd like to adopt a cat from a nearby shelter, mostly because I
> doubt I'd have the time to properly litter train a cat, coupled with
> the fact that I don't know How to litter train a cat, which I could
> see posing an even larger problem.

Cats take to litter like ducks take to water.
If you were adopting a neighborhood stray,
you might have to "train" the cat, to an extent,
but I wouldn't worry about a shelter cat.
They already know how to use the litter box.

A stray I adopted Dec. 2005 used my rose
beds as a litter box. To transition her to cat
litter, I put some mulch on top of cat litter.
Over time I scooped out the mulch until
only litter was left. She adjusted just fine.

> My questions are as follows...
>
> Is there anything one needs to do to train an adopted cat, like show
> them the litter box, leave them in the room with it overnight etc.?

See above. As another poster noted, it's
a good idea to put the cat's food and water
a distance from the litter, even in different
rooms, if possible.

> I hear a lot about having two cats at the least, so they don't get
> bored, any thoughts?

It really depends on the cat. As another poster
mentioned, the shelter staff will have a good
idea of which cats or kittens do well alone,
and which do better with a companion. You
can always adopt a bonded pair - siblings or
even non-related cats that get along famously.
I prefer having two or more cats even though
I'm retired and home a lot. I do think they
can be good company for each other.

> Is there any benefits to adopting over raising from birth?

If you've never had a cat before, raising
one from birth would be an absolute nightmare,
and there's no reason for it. Heck, I've had
cats for 40 years and I wouldn't attempt it!
There are tons of adoptable kittens and cats at
shelters already trained, tested, vaccinated, and
often spayed or neutered. The adoption fees
are usually quite the bargain.

> If one gets an already grown cat declawed, is that especialy cruel,
> or
> is that just an opinion thing, because I've heard both sides to that
> story.

I would personally never declaw a cat, but then
I put a much higher priority on my cats than on
any piece of furniture I own. Declawing IS
mutilation, and that's not a matter of debate. So
it depends on how you feel about mutilating
a cat for your convenience.

Providing scratching and climbing posts helps
with the furniture clawing, but not entirely.
Again, I speak from experience. :)

> There was an incident in this house several years ago where the
> previous tenant had a bunch of cats who peed all over the place in
> this little room in the attic, is that going to cause problems, with
> males especially, or would I need to stick to a female to avoid
> additional stink.

If those spots are in your living quarters, and
in areas where any cat you adopt will be, you
need to do what you can to treat the spots.
Petsmart has a small Stink-Finder brand light
that will help you find old (or new) urine stains.
I have one and it's really useful. Treating the
stains is a different issue. Here are some links
to read:
http://www.catsofaustralia.com/urinestainremoval.htm
http://www.nilodor.com/caturine.html?cat=1

Not all cats will "misbehave" just because
another or previous residence cat sprayed.
Again, I speak from experience. :)

Gender shouldn't make a difference.

> and finally,
> Is the allergen risk to my dad too high for me to even consider
> this?

You might want to consult with an
allergist about that.

> Any help that can be provided would be greatly appreciated

My first two cats were given to me by other
people - not by my choice. That was 1967.
Both cats lived into their late teens, and I've
never been without cats.

> -dorje

When I adopted two kittens at Petsmart, I
was given a bunch of literature (and coupons)
on cat care. I didn't need the literature, but
I did look it over and found it rather thorough.
You might ask the shelter people if they have
any literature handouts.

You've asked really good questions, which
is the best kind of start. Good luck.

Gail F.
Owned by Minya, Lao Ma, Ephiny,
Melosa, Marcus, Gabby

Jeffrey Kaplan
March 12th 07, 06:05 AM
It is alleged that claimed:

> - I live by myself in a fairly roomy apartment, which is essentially
> the top floor and attic of an old house, so there would not be any
> shortage of room.

Good.

> - My dad is deathly allergic to cats, he never does visit anyways, but
> my concern is when I go to visit them, if any residual allergens may
> stick to my clothes etc.

Do laundry more often. :)

> - I'd like to adopt a cat from a nearby shelter, mostly because I
> doubt I'd have the time to properly litter train a cat, coupled with

The one really has nothing to do with the other. But from a shelter is
a good idea. I got my Delany from a shelter, she was born there.

> Is there anything one needs to do to train an adopted cat, like show
> them the litter box, leave them in the room with it overnight etc.?

All I had to do was show my cat where the litter box is.

> I hear a lot about having two cats at the least, so they don't get
> bored, any thoughts?

I'd think that depends on the particular cats.

> Is there any benefits to adopting over raising from birth?

If the shelter is any good, you'll get the cat after it's been weaned,
spayed/neutered and given the first set of shots.

> If one gets an already grown cat declawed, is that especialy cruel, or
> is that just an opinion thing, because I've heard both sides to that
> story.

It's an opinion thing. Some people's opinions on this matter rival
that of organized religions going to war over who's god is bigger. IMO,
it's a pragmatic thing: Try to avoid it if possible, but if it's the
cat's claws or your furniture, rugs, legs... and it's an indoor-only
cat, I don't have a problem with it.

And after a couple weeks, neither did Delany. I had her declawed at
almost two years old because she was ripping apart my couch, recliner,
rugs, banisters and my legs, and +nothing+ was helping.

> There was an incident in this house several years ago where the
> previous tenant had a bunch of cats who peed all over the place in
> this little room in the attic, is that going to cause problems, with
> males especially, or would I need to stick to a female to avoid
> additional stink.

How thoroughly has that room been cleaned?

> and finally,
> Is the allergen risk to my dad too high for me to even consider this?

That, I don't know.

--
Jeffrey Kaplan www.gordol.org
The from userid is killfiled Send personal mail to gordol

Tips for Evil Geniuses: 18. I will remember that any robot / device /
mental power that can be remotely controlled from ten feet can, with
sufficient preparation, effort, and / or energy, be remotely controlled
from 100 miles or more.

RC Trost
March 13th 07, 11:20 PM
Getting a cat to use a litter box is so easy it could hardly be called
training. We've had, probably, a dozen cats over the years. I'll put the
cat in the litter box, hold the front paws and make digging motions. We've
never had a cat yet that took more than this. It's instinctive for them.

Don't know where you live but there are hundreds of no-kill cat shelters
around the country with cats of all ages, temperaments, colors, etc. The
people running them will have a good idea of their temperaments and will
help match a cat to your expectations.

Cats make wonderful, loving and easy-care pets. Enjoy yours!

--
D&L Trost
http://members.toast.net/trost
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello,
> I'm looking to solicit some advice concerning adopting a cat.
> Here's the situation I am currently in.
> -I have never owned a cat before in my entire life. We've always had
> dogs, and I always thought I wouldn't have the patience to walk
> something every day, I don't think the other tenants in the building
> would appreciate the barking, and most importantly, I'm allergic to
> dogs (but not cats, I checked)
> - I live by myself in a fairly roomy apartment, which is essentially
> the top floor and attic of an old house, so there would not be any
> shortage of room.
> - My dad is deathly allergic to cats, he never does visit anyways, but
> my concern is when I go to visit them, if any residual allergens may
> stick to my clothes etc.
> - I have a terrarium with a reptile in it, although I'm quite sure
> that the lid is secure. It's a metal cage that even I have trouble
> getting off.
> - I'd like to adopt a cat from a nearby shelter, mostly because I
> doubt I'd have the time to properly litter train a cat, coupled with
> the fact that I don't know How to litter train a cat, which I could
> see posing an even larger problem.
>
> My questions are as follows...
>
> Is there anything one needs to do to train an adopted cat, like show
> them the litter box, leave them in the room with it overnight etc.?
> I hear a lot about having two cats at the least, so they don't get
> bored, any thoughts?
> Is there any benefits to adopting over raising from birth?
> If one gets an already grown cat declawed, is that especialy cruel, or
> is that just an opinion thing, because I've heard both sides to that
> story.
> There was an incident in this house several years ago where the
> previous tenant had a bunch of cats who peed all over the place in
> this little room in the attic, is that going to cause problems, with
> males especially, or would I need to stick to a female to avoid
> additional stink.
> and finally,
> Is the allergen risk to my dad too high for me to even consider this?
>
> Any help that can be provided would be greatly appreciated
>
> -dorje
>

oldhickory
March 14th 07, 05:47 AM
I have a dear friend who is DEATHLY allergic to cats and does have a serious
(asthmatic) reaction when seated near someone who has cats--even as far away
as the next table in a restaurant.

She can never come visit me because of it. She came to visit in a city
nearby, and I showered, washed my hair and washed and dried my clothes
vigorously (machine) and scrubbed my shoes down, did not touch the cats
before I left to go meet her and dressed in the laundry room on the way out
of the house. She was fine.

I think the playing with a cat at a shelter, then going for a visit is a
good idea....
--
ie
ride fast, take chances.


> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello,
> I'm looking to solicit some advice concerning adopting a cat.
> Here's the situation I am currently in.
> -I have never owned a cat before in my entire life. We've always had
> dogs, and I always thought I wouldn't have the patience to walk
> something every day, I don't think the other tenants in the building
> would appreciate the barking, and most importantly, I'm allergic to
> dogs (but not cats, I checked)
> - I live by myself in a fairly roomy apartment, which is essentially
> the top floor and attic of an old house, so there would not be any
> shortage of room.
> - My dad is deathly allergic to cats, he never does visit anyways, but
> my concern is when I go to visit them, if any residual allergens may
> stick to my clothes etc.
> - I have a terrarium with a reptile in it, although I'm quite sure
> that the lid is secure. It's a metal cage that even I have trouble
> getting off.
> - I'd like to adopt a cat from a nearby shelter, mostly because I
> doubt I'd have the time to properly litter train a cat, coupled with
> the fact that I don't know How to litter train a cat, which I could
> see posing an even larger problem.
>
> My questions are as follows...
>
> Is there anything one needs to do to train an adopted cat, like show
> them the litter box, leave them in the room with it overnight etc.?
> I hear a lot about having two cats at the least, so they don't get
> bored, any thoughts?
> Is there any benefits to adopting over raising from birth?
> If one gets an already grown cat declawed, is that especialy cruel, or
> is that just an opinion thing, because I've heard both sides to that
> story.
> There was an incident in this house several years ago where the
> previous tenant had a bunch of cats who peed all over the place in
> this little room in the attic, is that going to cause problems, with
> males especially, or would I need to stick to a female to avoid
> additional stink.
> and finally,
> Is the allergen risk to my dad too high for me to even consider this?
>
> Any help that can be provided would be greatly appreciated
>
> -dorje
>