PDA

View Full Version : Kitten behavior


Teralyn
March 17th 07, 02:56 PM
I am new to this and need some help. I have a 7 month old male kitten.
He is beautiful and affectionate. When he gets in my lap and does that
"kneading" thing that cats do, his claws are partially out and it
HURTS. Is this normal? Is there a way I can make him stop?

TIA for any help

Debby Hanoka
March 17th 07, 03:31 PM
>I am new to this and need some help. I have a 7 month old male kitten.
> He is beautiful and affectionate. When he gets in my lap and does that
> "kneading" thing that cats do, his claws are partially out and it
> HURTS. Is this normal? Is there a way I can make him stop?

Yes, your kitten's kneading behavior is quite normal. You might want to try
clipping his claws so that they aren't so sharp, and his kneading doesn't
hurt as much. If you don't know how to clip claws, your vet can show you.

Debby Hanoka
dhanokaatearthlinkdotnet

Teralyn
March 17th 07, 03:38 PM
Thanks, I knew the kneading was normal. It's the claw thing that had
me baffled. I will get the vet to show me how to clip them.

Lis
March 17th 07, 03:39 PM
On Mar 17, 10:56 am, "Teralyn" > wrote:
> I am new to this and need some help. I have a 7 month old male kitten.
> He is beautiful and affectionate. When he gets in my lap and does that
> "kneading" thing that cats do, his claws are partially out and it
> HURTS. Is this normal? Is there a way I can make him stop?
>
> TIA for any help

You don't want him to stop; he's expressing his love and trust. You
want to encourage that.

What you need to do is clip his claws. You can buy a clipper at a pet
supply store, or you can just use a straight edge toenail clipper.
Just take off the tips the first time; be gentle, and give him a treat
afterwards. You'll be happier, and your vet will thank you, too.

Lis

Lynne
March 17th 07, 04:43 PM
on Sat, 17 Mar 2007 15:39:36 GMT, "Lis" > wrote:

> You don't want him to stop; he's expressing his love and trust. You
> want to encourage that.

Agree!

> What you need to do is clip his claws. You can buy a clipper at a pet
> supply store, or you can just use a straight edge toenail clipper.
> Just take off the tips the first time; be gentle, and give him a treat
> afterwards. You'll be happier, and your vet will thank you, too.

I find the small clippers designed specifically for cat claws are the
easiest to use on cats. When you are first starting out trimming claws,
just do one (maybe two) at a time the first day, then do the next one or
two the next day, etc. Gradually build up so the cat knows you aren't
going to hurt him. Eventually you will be able to do all of them at once,
but it could take many months before your cat is comfortable with that.
Just be very sure not to trim too short, and when kitty gets antsy, it's
time to give him a treat and wait for another time to do more.

--
Lynne

---MIKE---
March 17th 07, 05:50 PM
When Tiger (23 pounds) wants to get on my lap I have a folded towel
handy to put on my lap before he gets on. He can knead the towel all he
wants. Also, if something startles him (like the telephone) he can jump
off without digging me with his hind claws. He knows that the towel is
an invitation.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

bobblespin
March 17th 07, 05:59 PM
Lynne > wrote in
m:

> on Sat, 17 Mar 2007 15:39:36 GMT, "Lis" > wrote:
>
>> You don't want him to stop; he's expressing his love and trust. You
>> want to encourage that.
>
> Agree!
>
>> What you need to do is clip his claws. You can buy a clipper at a pet
>> supply store, or you can just use a straight edge toenail clipper.
>> Just take off the tips the first time; be gentle, and give him a
>> treat afterwards. You'll be happier, and your vet will thank you,
>> too.
>
> I find the small clippers designed specifically for cat claws are the
> easiest to use on cats. When you are first starting out trimming
> claws, just do one (maybe two) at a time the first day, then do the
> next one or two the next day, etc. Gradually build up so the cat
> knows you aren't going to hurt him. Eventually you will be able to do
> all of them at once, but it could take many months before your cat is
> comfortable with that. Just be very sure not to trim too short, and
> when kitty gets antsy, it's time to give him a treat and wait for
> another time to do more.
>

before you trim his claws the first time, it will help if you handle his
paws/toes so that he gets used to having them handled, and he sees that
good things come out of having them touched (praise, treat, fussing...).

Bobble

--
Have you hugged your cat today?

Sonny's web page --> http://web.ncf.ca/ai151/index2.html

22brix
March 17th 07, 06:35 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> "Teralyn" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> Thanks, I knew the kneading was normal. It's the claw thing that had
>> me baffled. I will get the vet to show me how to clip them.
>>
>
> It's easy with two people, even with a cat that resists. We do our cats'
> claws every month, just cut the tips off. ONCE my husband nicked the
> quick--Gracie jumped and I just about died. However--far from being the
> huge emergency I thought it was going to be, she neve showed another sign
> of discomfort, it only bled a little, and it healed right up. My point
> being, though you want to be very careful NOT to cut too low, if you do it
> is not the end of the world.
>
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>

With my cats, I think they dislike being restrained more than having their
nails clipped.

Lynne
March 17th 07, 07:07 PM
on Sat, 17 Mar 2007 18:35:51 GMT, "22brix" >
wrote:

> With my cats, I think they dislike being restrained more than having
> their nails clipped.

That would be true of Rudy, too. He sits patiently when I do his claws,
but at first (keep in mind he was a feral who I adopted at 4 months of
age), he wasn't having any part of it! Levi squirms, but he still
tolerates it. I've been doing it every week since he was teeny, though, so
I don't think he's going to stop squirming.

--
Lynne

cybercat
March 17th 07, 07:15 PM
"Teralyn" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Thanks, I knew the kneading was normal. It's the claw thing that had
> me baffled. I will get the vet to show me how to clip them.
>

It's easy with two people, even with a cat that resists. We do our cats'
claws every month, just cut the tips off. ONCE my husband nicked the
quick--Gracie jumped and I just about died. However--far from being the huge
emergency I thought it was going to be, she neve showed another sign of
discomfort, it only bled a little, and it healed right up. My point being,
though you want to be very careful NOT to cut too low, if you do it is not
the end of the world.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

22brix
March 17th 07, 07:15 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> on Sat, 17 Mar 2007 18:35:51 GMT, "22brix" >
> wrote:
>
>> With my cats, I think they dislike being restrained more than having
>> their nails clipped.
>
> That would be true of Rudy, too. He sits patiently when I do his claws,
> but at first (keep in mind he was a feral who I adopted at 4 months of
> age), he wasn't having any part of it! Levi squirms, but he still
> tolerates it. I've been doing it every week since he was teeny, though,
> so
> I don't think he's going to stop squirming.
>
> --
> Lynne

Actually, one of my most tolerant cats, my old lady cat Molly, is one of the
hardest to do--she really dislikes it and it takes two people! Go figure!

Bonnie

T
March 17th 07, 09:28 PM
In article >,
says...
> When Tiger (23 pounds) wants to get on my lap I have a folded towel
> handy to put on my lap before he gets on. He can knead the towel all he
> wants. Also, if something startles him (like the telephone) he can jump
> off without digging me with his hind claws. He knows that the towel is
> an invitation.
>
>
> ---MIKE---
> >>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
> >> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
>
>

I'v had Evangeline since mid January and already I can see the changes.
She's much more affectionate, and she's a kneader too. But at around
10lbs she's not too bad and she goes very gently with the kneading.

T
March 17th 07, 09:29 PM
In article >,
says...
>
> "Teralyn" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> > Thanks, I knew the kneading was normal. It's the claw thing that had
> > me baffled. I will get the vet to show me how to clip them.
> >
>
> It's easy with two people, even with a cat that resists. We do our cats'
> claws every month, just cut the tips off. ONCE my husband nicked the
> quick--Gracie jumped and I just about died. However--far from being the huge
> emergency I thought it was going to be, she neve showed another sign of
> discomfort, it only bled a little, and it healed right up. My point being,
> though you want to be very careful NOT to cut too low, if you do it is not
> the end of the world.
>
>
>
>

If you gently press on the pad above the claw, it'll extend. If you look
at it you can see the quick and avoid it.

T
March 17th 07, 09:31 PM
In article >,
says...
>
> "Lynne" > wrote in message
> m...
> > on Sat, 17 Mar 2007 18:35:51 GMT, "22brix" >
> > wrote:
> >
> >> With my cats, I think they dislike being restrained more than having
> >> their nails clipped.
> >
> > That would be true of Rudy, too. He sits patiently when I do his claws,
> > but at first (keep in mind he was a feral who I adopted at 4 months of
> > age), he wasn't having any part of it! Levi squirms, but he still
> > tolerates it. I've been doing it every week since he was teeny, though,
> > so
> > I don't think he's going to stop squirming.
> >
> > --
> > Lynne
>
> Actually, one of my most tolerant cats, my old lady cat Molly, is one of the
> hardest to do--she really dislikes it and it takes two people! Go figure!
>
> Bonnie

Back when my three former cats were alive, here's how claw clipping
went:

Cosimo the big boy was easy because he didn't mind you playing with his
paws and he couldn't move too fast anyhow.

Emily the little cat (6.5lbs) was easy as she'd just freeze in position
and let you clip away.

Randy could be a little rambunctious but he knew that once it was over
it was Pounce time.


Evangeline does NOT like having her paws manipulated at all and it's a
challenge to clip her claws.

Lis
March 17th 07, 10:29 PM
On Mar 17, 12:43 pm, Lynne > wrote:
> on Sat, 17 Mar 2007 15:39:36 GMT, "Lis" > wrote:
>
> > You don't want him to stop; he's expressing his love and trust. You
> > want to encourage that.
>
> Agree!
>
> > What you need to do is clip his claws. You can buy a clipper at a pet
> > supply store, or you can just use a straight edge toenail clipper.
> > Just take off the tips the first time; be gentle, and give him a treat
> > afterwards. You'll be happier, and your vet will thank you, too.
>
> I find the small clippers designed specifically for cat claws are the
> easiest to use on cats.

I've always found the toenail clippers easier, but that's likely just
an issue of my hand and what it'll hold easily.

> When you are first starting out trimming claws,
> just do one (maybe two) at a time the first day, then do the next one or
> two the next day, etc. Gradually build up so the cat knows you aren't
> going to hurt him. Eventually you will be able to do all of them at once,
> but it could take many months before your cat is comfortable with that.
> Just be very sure not to trim too short, and when kitty gets antsy, it's
> time to give him a treat and wait for another time to do more.

I started my two when they were each just about seven months, and they
now take it for granted that every so often I interrupt a kneading &
petting session to trim their claws, and then resume petting them. The
older one even keeps purring throughout, usually. So while it is
likely to take months for him to get comfortable with it, in the end
he may be almost unbelievably comfortable with it!

Lis

Rene S.
March 19th 07, 07:01 PM
On Mar 17, 12:50 pm, (---MIKE---) wrote:
> When Tiger (23 pounds) wants to get on my lap I have a folded towel
> handy to put on my lap before he gets on. He can knead the towel all he
> wants. Also, if something startles him (like the telephone) he can jump
> off without digging me with his hind claws. He knows that the towel is
> an invitation.
>
> ---MIKE--->>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire

I use a towel as well. however, I agree with everyone in saying that
trimming his nails is still a good idea. I prefer to use the cat nail
clippers that look like a tiny scissors. The cheaper ones make a
popping noise that scared my cats, but the "scissors" is silent. They
cost a bit more (about $10) but they work much better.

Cheryl
March 20th 07, 01:32 AM
On Mon 19 Mar 2007 03:01:42p, Rene S. wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ps.com>:

> I use a towel as well. however, I agree with everyone in saying
> that trimming his nails is still a good idea. I prefer to use
> the cat nail clippers that look like a tiny scissors. The
> cheaper ones make a popping noise that scared my cats, but the
> "scissors" is silent. They cost a bit more (about $10) but they
> work much better.

I like those, too. I am not comfortable with the type with the hole
that you put the claw through -- too easy for that big shape to take
off too much. I'd also like to stress that they have to be sharp.
Since I don't know of a way to sharpen the blades of the tiny scissor
type, I just replace them when it is hard to get through a claw.

--
Cheryl

Lynne
March 20th 07, 01:59 AM
on Tue, 20 Mar 2007 01:32:39 GMT, Cheryl >
wrote:

> I like those, too. I am not comfortable with the type with the hole
> that you put the claw through -- too easy for that big shape to take
> off too much. I'd also like to stress that they have to be sharp.
> Since I don't know of a way to sharpen the blades of the tiny scissor
> type, I just replace them when it is hard to get through a claw.

I like the small cat scissor-type clippers more than any others I've used
because you can really see the claw and control exactly how much you clip
off. I also don't know of a way to sharpen that little curved blade, so I
replace them when they start to feel dull, too. If the nails start to
splinter, it's past time to replace your clippes, because they are being
crushed rather than cleanly cut.

--
Lynne

mlbriggs
March 20th 07, 02:16 AM
On Sat, 17 Mar 2007 13:50:08 -0400, ---MIKE--- wrote:

> When Tiger (23 pounds) wants to get on my lap I have a folded towel handy
> to put on my lap before he gets on. He can knead the towel all he wants.
> Also, if something startles him (like the telephone) he can jump off
> without digging me with his hind claws. He knows that the towel is an
> invitation.
>
>
> ---MIKE---
>>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
> >> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')


I have used a very heavy bath towel on my lap for TuTu for several years.
When she kneads, I tap a paw and say "no claws"/ She now knows what
that means. TuTu is very large and heavy, a fact which I keep telling her.
I also comb and brush her with the towel on my lap. MLB

Lynne
March 20th 07, 02:24 AM
on Tue, 20 Mar 2007 02:16:08 GMT, mlbriggs > wrote:

> TuTu is very large and heavy, a fact which I keep
> telling her.

When I call Rudy "fat" my daughter chimes in with, "he's not fat! He's big
boned!!"

(He's fat.)

--
Lynne