PDA

View Full Version : Over grooming


lyngiven
March 20th 07, 11:51 AM
Please can anyone suggest how a remedy to stop my 13 year old cat
overgrooming - to the point of baldness - over large sections of her
body. She has become very restless as well and is constantly meowing
for attention and food. she has also started to piddle inside the
house. she has been to teh vet on various ocassions but no successful
treatment has been found.
any advice would be gratefully received.

Lyngiven

bookie
March 20th 07, 12:42 PM
On 20 Mar, 11:51, "lyngiven" > wrote:
> Please can anyone suggest how a remedy to stop my 13 year old cat
> overgrooming - to the point of baldness - over large sections of her
> body. She has become very restless as well and is constantly meowing
> for attention and food. she has also started to piddle inside the
> house. she has been to teh vet on various ocassions but no successful
> treatment has been found.
> any advice would be gratefully received.
>
> Lyngiven

have there been any recent changes in your household which coudl have
stressed her out? a new animal (cat, dog, anything) been introduced?
new baby? new person move into the house? what abuot your neighbours
have they got themselves a new pet?

what you are describing are behavioural problems caused by stress
inthe animal, and since your cat cannot simply say "hey mum, I'm
stressed" this is how they show it and try (badly ) to cope with it.
The stresses may be caused by changes in domestic circumstances, in
the cats home environment, maybe your cat feels under threat from an
intruder or newcomer to your household and feels that their territory
may be being taken over, hence the peeing in inappropriate places to
mark their territory.

check out what may have changed in your domestic set up, that may be
the answer as to why she is doing all this. please do nto be angry
with your puss, she is obviously upset by something and she needs her
mum to comfort her, she is not doing this deliberately to **** you
off, please understand this.

if ti si some sort of household upset which has caused this you coudl
try using a feliway diffuser, plug in thing which releases synthetic
hormones which the cat finds calming and may go some way to maeliorate
the problem

I hope you find a solution, your cat is obviously very unhappy and
needs your help
bookie

Rene S.
March 20th 07, 03:10 PM
On Mar 20, 6:51 am, "lyngiven" > wrote:
> Please can anyone suggest how a remedy to stop my 13 year old cat
> overgrooming - to the point of baldness - over large sections of her
> body. She has become very restless as well and is constantly meowing
> for attention and food. she has also started to piddle inside the
> house. she has been to teh vet on various ocassions but no successful
> treatment has been found.
> any advice would be gratefully received.
>
> Lyngiven

I agree with what bookie said, but I'd also suggest going to another
vet and getting a second opinion. Have you had bloodwork done--it's
possible she could have something like hyperthryoidism, easily treated
with medication. Poor girl. She's obviously unhappy and is trying to
get your attention the only ways she knows how.

lyngiven
March 23rd 07, 10:17 AM
On Mar 20, 12:42 pm, "bookie" > wrote:
> On 20 Mar, 11:51, "lyngiven" > wrote:
>
> > Please can anyone suggest how a remedy to stop my 13 year old cat
> > overgrooming - to the point of baldness - over large sections of her
> > body. She has become very restless as well and is constantly meowing
> > for attention and food. she has also started to piddle inside the
> > house. she has been to teh vet on various ocassions but no successful
> > treatment has been found.
> > any advice would be gratefully received.
>
> > Lyngiven
>
> have there been any recent changes in your household which coudl have
> stressed her out? a new animal (cat, dog, anything) been introduced?
> new baby? new person move into the house? what abuot your neighbours
> have they got themselves a new pet?
>
> what you are describing are behavioural problems caused by stress
> inthe animal, and since your cat cannot simply say "hey mum, I'm
> stressed" this is how they show it and try (badly ) to cope with it.
> The stresses may be caused by changes in domestic circumstances, in
> the cats home environment, maybe your cat feels under threat from an
> intruder or newcomer to your household and feels that their territory
> may be being taken over, hence the peeing in inappropriate places to
> mark their territory.
>
> check out what may have changed in your domestic set up, that may be
> the answer as to why she is doing all this. please do nto be angry
> with your puss, she is obviously upset by something and she needs her
> mum to comfort her, she is not doing this deliberately to **** you
> off, please understand this.
>
> if ti si some sort of household upset which has caused this you coudl
> try using a feliway diffuser, plug in thing which releases synthetic
> hormones which the cat finds calming and may go some way to maeliorate
> the problem
>
> I hope you find a solution, your cat is obviously very unhappy and
> needs your help
> bookie

Hi Bookie

Thank you for your suggestions. I think a major contributary factor is
that the area where we live is becoming more built up and at least 3
new cats has moved into teh vicinity. We love our cat very much and
don't like to see her distressed. We are now trying a 'plug-in' room
fragancer placed near her basket which gives off the sent of a mother
cat and we are putting Valerian drops on her cushion. She seems to be
more settled but I think it will a long time before we see much
improvement.
LG

lyngiven
March 23rd 07, 10:36 AM
On Mar 20, 3:10 pm, "Rene S." > wrote:
> On Mar 20, 6:51 am, "lyngiven" > wrote:
>
> > Please can anyone suggest how a remedy to stop my 13 year old cat
> > overgrooming - to the point of baldness - over large sections of her
> > body. She has become very restless as well and is constantly meowing
> > for attention and food. she has also started to piddle inside the
> > house. she has been to teh vet on various ocassions but no successful
> > treatment has been found.
> > any advice would be gratefully received.
>
> > Lyngiven
>
> I agree with what bookie said, but I'd also suggest going to another
> vet and getting a second opinion. Have you had bloodwork done--it's
> possible she could have something like hyperthryoidism, easily treated
> with medication. Poor girl. She's obviously unhappy and is trying to
> get your attention the only ways she knows how.

Hi All

Thanks for this further advice. We have had bloodwork work done and
she has been put on a heart monitor. Your suggestion of
hyperthryoidism is interesting and I will ask the vet if this could be
a possibility. My think that the problem may be caused by hormnal
imbalance and I have noticed that seems to start up at this time of
the year and then fades during the autumn and disappears for the
winter.

It may be time to consult another vet.

LG