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James
March 20th 07, 07:25 PM
Over 40 brands recalled. If they're all made by the same manufacturer
why spend money on brand names?

Stacey
March 20th 07, 07:27 PM
From another newsgroup:


No, no, it's a CONTRACT company. They make foods for lots of different
companies, under contract, per the recipe they are given. The foods are
NOT the same. They are just being produced, under different contracts,
from different recipes, at the same place. A lot of human food is made
this way. IE, Coca Cola has contracts with bottling companies that make
Coke, but they also make K Cola for a different customer from a
different recipe.

For some reason people are getting the idea that all foods made at a
contract company are the same food. That's not what a contract company
does.

Stacey

In article om>, James says...
>
>Over 40 brands recalled. If they're all made by the same manufacturer
>why spend money on brand names?
>

cindys
March 20th 07, 07:31 PM
"James" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Over 40 brands recalled. If they're all made by the same manufacturer
> why spend money on brand names?
----------
Because all the foods are not necessarily the same. The same manufacturer
could be producing multiple different formulas, some higher end, some lower
end.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Kittie Kat
March 20th 07, 07:32 PM
On Mar 20, 2:27 pm, Stacey > wrote:
> From another newsgroup:
>
> No, no, it's a CONTRACT company. They make foods for lots of different
> companies, under contract, per the recipe they are given. The foods are
> NOT the same. They are just being produced, under different contracts,
> from different recipes, at the same place. A lot of human food is made
> this way. IE, Coca Cola has contracts with bottling companies that make
> Coke, but they also make K Cola for a different customer from a
> different recipe.
>
> For some reason people are getting the idea that all foods made at a
> contract company are the same food. That's not what a contract company
> does.
>
> Stacey
>
> In article om>, James says...
>
>
>
> >Over 40 brands recalled. If they're all made by the same manufacturer
> >why spend money on brand names?

But if they contract out to a company, then they will be held
responsible if they choose a company - like Menu Foods - that buys
crap to save a buck and ends up selling poison.

I don't give a damn if it's pet food or chicken noodle soup.

I'm done with all the companies that have used Menu Foods, even if in
the end it means I have to start cooking chickens every ****ing day
and feeding my cats cooked chicken.

Lis
March 20th 07, 07:55 PM
On Mar 20, 3:32 pm, "Kittie Kat" > wrote:
> On Mar 20, 2:27 pm, Stacey > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > From another newsgroup:
>
> > No, no, it's a CONTRACT company. They make foods for lots of different
> > companies, under contract, per the recipe they are given. The foods are
> > NOT the same. They are just being produced, under different contracts,
> > from different recipes, at the same place. A lot of human food is made
> > this way. IE, Coca Cola has contracts with bottling companies that make
> > Coke, but they also make K Cola for a different customer from a
> > different recipe.
>
> > For some reason people are getting the idea that all foods made at a
> > contract company are the same food. That's not what a contract company
> > does.
>
> > Stacey
>
> > In article om>, James says...
>
> > >Over 40 brands recalled. If they're all made by the same manufacturer
> > >why spend money on brand names?
>
> But if they contract out to a company, then they will be held
> responsible if they choose a company - like Menu Foods - that buys
> crap to save a buck and ends up selling poison.
>
> I don't give a damn if it's pet food or chicken noodle soup.

Um, yah, but the thing is, Menu Foods has up to now been a reliable
supplier of foods that were safe and met the companies'
specifications. There may be an issue with how frequently and by what
methods they quality-tested what they received from Menu, but it's
important to remember that NO method will completely eliminate all
possibility of problems.

> I'm done with all the companies that have used Menu Foods, even if in
> the end it means I have to start cooking chickens every ****ing day
> and feeding my cats cooked chicken.

This makes no sense. Pressuring them to drop Menu NOW, sure; issuing a
commercial "death penalty" for having trusted a supplier who has
previously always been reliable is nuts. And unless you're prepared to
feed your cat whole ground mouse, you're going to have a tough time
putting together a diet for her that's as balanced and complete as a
premium commercial food.

Lis

mlbriggs
March 20th 07, 09:17 PM
On Tue, 20 Mar 2007 12:25:37 -0700, James wrote:

> Over 40 brands recalled. If they're all made by the same manufacturer why
> spend money on brand names?


Re-read the information. They are "contract" producers and produce
formulas provided by their purchasers. So they are NOT all the same. MLB

Patty
March 21st 07, 06:39 PM
On 20 Mar 2007 12:55:39 -0700, Lis wrote:

>
> This makes no sense. Pressuring them to drop Menu NOW, sure; issuing a
> commercial "death penalty" for having trusted a supplier who has
> previously always been reliable is nuts. And unless you're prepared to
> feed your cat whole ground mouse, you're going to have a tough time
> putting together a diet for her that's as balanced and complete as a
> premium commercial food.
>
> Lis

I've always wondered about this. My Rusty was a born hunter, having been
descended from generations of farm cats, and he always preferred what he
caught to any canned or bagged food on the market. That said, he is now
16, a wee bit slow on his feet so he doesn't catch what he hunts so much
anymore (when he does hunt). Anyhow, until this point in time, he has been
the healthiest of cats even though his diet consisted more of wildlife than
any commercial food product. So, are there better nutrients in wildlife
than say, grocery store chicken? Rusty has never had any problems with
hairballs either, I don't recall him ever throwing any up, and he's a
domestic long hair. I read once that the rougage the big wild cats get
from eating bones and such, takes care of their need for any type of
hairball treatment.

Oh, and he always liked the mice heads best.

Patty

Spot
March 21st 07, 10:24 PM
Newsflash it's even the cheap stuff killing the cats. Didn't you notice
that special kitty is on the list it's about as cheap as it gets.

Celeste

"James" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Over 40 brands recalled. If they're all made by the same manufacturer
> why spend money on brand names?
>

---MIKE---
March 21st 07, 11:34 PM
There are still premium foods that are NOT made by Menu. Wellness and
Innova are two. Also, all of the suspect foods are the meat chunks in
gravy variety and the bad ingredient is wheat gluton.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Cheryl
March 22nd 07, 12:34 AM
On Wed 21 Mar 2007 07:34:20p, ---MIKE--- wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> There are still premium foods that are NOT made by Menu.
> Wellness and Innova are two. Also, all of the suspect foods are
> the meat chunks in gravy variety and the bad ingredient is wheat
> gluton.

I wouldn't even consider any of the affected foods to be premium. I
don't consider Iams or Eukanuba premium, and Nutro, while maybe it
used to be hasn't been so in a while from what I've read. Wheat
gluton still isn't confirmed as the culprit. And why the hell
aren't they disclosing the supplier name of this so-called tainted
wheat gluton ingredient? Why aren't they standing up to defend
their product? All of this smells highly of fish IMO. One article
I read said that it was cats and dogs participating in a taste test
that died, and early on it was more than the one dog they're now
saying died. There is nothing at all clear yet in this case and it
broke nearly a week ago. No wonder everyone is concerned and
scared.

--
Cheryl

Lis
March 22nd 07, 05:32 PM
On Mar 21, 2:39 pm, Patty > wrote:
> On 20 Mar 2007 12:55:39 -0700, Lis wrote:
>
>
>
> > This makes no sense. Pressuring them to drop Menu NOW, sure; issuing a
> > commercial "death penalty" for having trusted a supplier who has
> > previously always been reliable is nuts. And unless you're prepared to
> > feed your cat whole ground mouse, you're going to have a tough time
> > putting together a diet for her that's as balanced and complete as a
> > premium commercial food.
>
> > Lis
>
> I've always wondered about this. My Rusty was a born hunter, having been
> descended from generations of farm cats, and he always preferred what he
> caught to any canned or bagged food on the market. That said, he is now
> 16, a wee bit slow on his feet so he doesn't catch what he hunts so much
> anymore (when he does hunt). Anyhow, until this point in time, he has been
> the healthiest of cats even though his diet consisted more of wildlife than
> any commercial food product. So, are there better nutrients in wildlife
> than say, grocery store chicken? Rusty has never had any problems with
> hairballs either, I don't recall him ever throwing any up, and he's a
> domestic long hair. I read once that the rougage the big wild cats get
> from eating bones and such, takes care of their need for any type of
> hairball treatment.
>
> Oh, and he always liked the mice heads best.
>
> Patty

When Rusty eats a mouse, he eats the whole mouse--a complete and
balanced meal for a cat.

When you feed him grocery store chicken, you feed him parts. Not the
whole thing, not the parts humans find disgusting, and not the
contents of the chicken's stomach when it died. You can cook for you
cat, but you need to remember that your intincts about what's
nutritious (and tasty and appetizing, but especially nutritious) are
wrong, because cats are the only domestic animal that's an obligate
carnivore. There ARE some good cookbooks out there that can give you
good guidance, but it's a lot of work, and most people simply aren't
willing to both do all the work, and ignore their instincts in the
cause of doing it right. (I'd post the titles of those cookbooks if I
still had any of them; sorry!)

Just cooking chicken for your cat, even including organ meats, is
simply not as good as a well-tested, premium commercial food, that's
been carefully developed to both provide a healthy diet for the cat,
AND not be too disgusting-smelling when opened for people to buy it a
second time. (Really. Every so often some company gets as far as
limited market-testing of whole ground mouse. Even true cat lovers
don't open that second can.)

Lis

Cat Protector
March 22nd 07, 05:40 PM
What I don't get is those who feed their cats a raw meat diet. This could
potentially make your cat sick with salmonella or other harmful bacteria. At
least with canned food it's been processed.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"Lis" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Mar 21, 2:39 pm, Patty > wrote:
>> On 20 Mar 2007 12:55:39 -0700, Lis wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> > This makes no sense. Pressuring them to drop Menu NOW, sure; issuing a
>> > commercial "death penalty" for having trusted a supplier who has
>> > previously always been reliable is nuts. And unless you're prepared to
>> > feed your cat whole ground mouse, you're going to have a tough time
>> > putting together a diet for her that's as balanced and complete as a
>> > premium commercial food.
>>
>> > Lis
>>
>> I've always wondered about this. My Rusty was a born hunter, having been
>> descended from generations of farm cats, and he always preferred what he
>> caught to any canned or bagged food on the market. That said, he is now
>> 16, a wee bit slow on his feet so he doesn't catch what he hunts so much
>> anymore (when he does hunt). Anyhow, until this point in time, he has
>> been
>> the healthiest of cats even though his diet consisted more of wildlife
>> than
>> any commercial food product. So, are there better nutrients in wildlife
>> than say, grocery store chicken? Rusty has never had any problems with
>> hairballs either, I don't recall him ever throwing any up, and he's a
>> domestic long hair. I read once that the rougage the big wild cats get
>> from eating bones and such, takes care of their need for any type of
>> hairball treatment.
>>
>> Oh, and he always liked the mice heads best.
>>
>> Patty
>
> When Rusty eats a mouse, he eats the whole mouse--a complete and
> balanced meal for a cat.
>
> When you feed him grocery store chicken, you feed him parts. Not the
> whole thing, not the parts humans find disgusting, and not the
> contents of the chicken's stomach when it died. You can cook for you
> cat, but you need to remember that your intincts about what's
> nutritious (and tasty and appetizing, but especially nutritious) are
> wrong, because cats are the only domestic animal that's an obligate
> carnivore. There ARE some good cookbooks out there that can give you
> good guidance, but it's a lot of work, and most people simply aren't
> willing to both do all the work, and ignore their instincts in the
> cause of doing it right. (I'd post the titles of those cookbooks if I
> still had any of them; sorry!)
>
> Just cooking chicken for your cat, even including organ meats, is
> simply not as good as a well-tested, premium commercial food, that's
> been carefully developed to both provide a healthy diet for the cat,
> AND not be too disgusting-smelling when opened for people to buy it a
> second time. (Really. Every so often some company gets as far as
> limited market-testing of whole ground mouse. Even true cat lovers
> don't open that second can.)
>
> Lis
>

Lynne
March 22nd 07, 05:52 PM
on Thu, 22 Mar 2007 17:40:54 GMT, "Cat Protector" >
wrote:

> What I don't get is those who feed their cats a raw meat diet. This
> could potentially make your cat sick with salmonella or other harmful
> bacteria. At least with canned food it's been processed.

Well you could do your homework (think: Google) and then you would learn
why salmonella and "other harmful bacteria" aren't harmful to cats.

Just a thought.

--
Lynne

Cat Protector
March 22nd 07, 06:36 PM
You will find most vets will also say the same thing. Feeding your cat a raw
diet is doing more harm than good.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> on Thu, 22 Mar 2007 17:40:54 GMT, "Cat Protector" >
> wrote:
>
>> What I don't get is those who feed their cats a raw meat diet. This
>> could potentially make your cat sick with salmonella or other harmful
>> bacteria. At least with canned food it's been processed.
>
> Well you could do your homework (think: Google) and then you would learn
> why salmonella and "other harmful bacteria" aren't harmful to cats.
>
> Just a thought.
>
> --
> Lynne

Sherry
March 22nd 07, 08:02 PM
On Mar 21, 1:39 pm, Patty > wrote:
>
> Oh, and he always liked the mice heads best.
>
> Patty

Well, the way I understand it, mouse brains are "nutritious and
delicious." IIRC, that's the main source of taurine.

Sherry

Sherry
March 22nd 07, 08:04 PM
On Mar 22, 12:40 pm, "Cat Protector" > wrote:
> What I don't get is those who feed their cats a raw meat diet. This could
> potentially make your cat sick with salmonella or other harmful bacteria. At
> least with canned food it's been processed.
>

Well, there's a lot more to it than hacking up raw meat and throwing
to the cats. Feeding a raw diet *can* be done right, but just like
commercial cat food, there's a formula to follow. It takes a lot of
dedication to do it right. Bacteria isn't an issue if safe-handling
guidelines are followed.
I wouldn't ever do it. It's a lot of work, and very expensive.

Sherry

Lynne
March 22nd 07, 08:18 PM
on Thu, 22 Mar 2007 20:04:06 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:

> Well, there's a lot more to it than hacking up raw meat and throwing
> to the cats. Feeding a raw diet *can* be done right, but just like
> commercial cat food, there's a formula to follow. It takes a lot of
> dedication to do it right. Bacteria isn't an issue if safe-handling
> guidelines are followed.
> I wouldn't ever do it. It's a lot of work, and very expensive.

I'd buy canned mice for my cats (heck, I buy dead frozen mice for the
snake), but I'll bet chasing them down and killing them is half the fun of
consuming them. I imagine that if some bold company were to can mice,
they'd still have to do something to it in order to make it more appealing
to kitties.

--
Lynne

Gail Futoran
March 23rd 07, 12:00 AM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
...
> on Thu, 22 Mar 2007 20:04:06 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>
>> Well, there's a lot more to it than hacking up raw meat and
>> throwing
>> to the cats. Feeding a raw diet *can* be done right, but just like
>> commercial cat food, there's a formula to follow. It takes a lot of
>> dedication to do it right. Bacteria isn't an issue if safe-handling
>> guidelines are followed.
>> I wouldn't ever do it. It's a lot of work, and very expensive.
>
> I'd buy canned mice for my cats (heck, I buy dead frozen mice for
> the
> snake), but I'll bet chasing them down and killing them is half the
> fun of
> consuming them. I imagine that if some bold company were to can
> mice,
> they'd still have to do something to it in order to make it more
> appealing
> to kitties.
>
> --
> Lynne

My former neighborhood stray, Melosa,
managed on her own for close to a year,
at best guess, including feeding a litter
(presumably her first). I'm in a rural area
and I'm guessing she dined mostly on
field mice. She is now the least picky
eater of my cats, whether Wellness or
Fancy Feast or Science Diet. This is the
cat I intended to TNR but who wouldn't
leave the house after I brought her home
from the vet. I think she's one who might
disagree with you that it's fun to chase
one's food. :) Now my pampered
purebred Tonks, that's a different matter!

Serious question about canned food: I'd
changed from 100% dry to at least one daily
feeding of canned (two daily feddings for
the kittens until they reach about 9 months)
after starting to read this newsgroup several
years ago.

None of the cats (except Melosa) will eat
much of the canned, preferring dry, but
I've persisted. Now I'm wondering if I
should forget the canned until this whole
recall business is concluded.

Anyone have any thoughts on that?

Gail F.

The Cat Whisperer[_2_]
March 23rd 07, 12:05 AM
You are doing the right thing... keep it up, Wellness is great and is my
cat's fav.
They should have wet food as well as dry, so avoid the bad stuff and stick
with The GOOD stuff... Wellness, Natural Balance, .....

"Gail Futoran" > wrote in message
...
> "Lynne" > wrote in message
> ...
>> on Thu, 22 Mar 2007 20:04:06 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>>
>>> Well, there's a lot more to it than hacking up raw meat and throwing
>>> to the cats. Feeding a raw diet *can* be done right, but just like
>>> commercial cat food, there's a formula to follow. It takes a lot of
>>> dedication to do it right. Bacteria isn't an issue if safe-handling
>>> guidelines are followed.
>>> I wouldn't ever do it. It's a lot of work, and very expensive.
>>
>> I'd buy canned mice for my cats (heck, I buy dead frozen mice for the
>> snake), but I'll bet chasing them down and killing them is half the fun
>> of
>> consuming them. I imagine that if some bold company were to can mice,
>> they'd still have to do something to it in order to make it more
>> appealing
>> to kitties.
>>
>> --
>> Lynne
>
> My former neighborhood stray, Melosa,
> managed on her own for close to a year,
> at best guess, including feeding a litter
> (presumably her first). I'm in a rural area
> and I'm guessing she dined mostly on
> field mice. She is now the least picky
> eater of my cats, whether Wellness or
> Fancy Feast or Science Diet. This is the
> cat I intended to TNR but who wouldn't
> leave the house after I brought her home
> from the vet. I think she's one who might
> disagree with you that it's fun to chase
> one's food. :) Now my pampered
> purebred Tonks, that's a different matter!
>
> Serious question about canned food: I'd
> changed from 100% dry to at least one daily
> feeding of canned (two daily feddings for
> the kittens until they reach about 9 months)
> after starting to read this newsgroup several
> years ago.
>
> None of the cats (except Melosa) will eat
> much of the canned, preferring dry, but
> I've persisted. Now I'm wondering if I
> should forget the canned until this whole
> recall business is concluded.
>
> Anyone have any thoughts on that?
>
> Gail F.
>
>



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 12:11 AM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 00:00:06 GMT, "Gail Futoran"
> wrote:

> Serious question about canned food: I'd
> changed from 100% dry to at least one daily
> feeding of canned (two daily feddings for
> the kittens until they reach about 9 months)
> after starting to read this newsgroup several
> years ago.
>
> None of the cats (except Melosa) will eat
> much of the canned, preferring dry, but
> I've persisted. Now I'm wondering if I
> should forget the canned until this whole
> recall business is concluded.
>
> Anyone have any thoughts on that?

It may be paranoia on both our parts, but I've had the same thoughts. Now
that I know Innova Evo is a Menu Food product, I'm not going to serve
anymore wet until I'm absolutely certain it's safe. I've only used 1 can
out of the last case I purchased, so I really don't have a high level of
comfort based on any "well it hasn't hurt them yet" experiences...

--
Lynne

Cheryl
March 23rd 07, 01:17 AM
On Thu 22 Mar 2007 08:11:35p, Lynne wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
m>:

> Now
> that I know Innova Evo is a Menu Food product, I'm not going to
> serve anymore wet until I'm absolutely certain it's safe.

How did I miss this? It is??

--
Cheryl

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 02:00 AM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 01:17:40 GMT, Cheryl >
wrote:

>> Now
>> that I know Innova Evo is a Menu Food product, I'm not going to
>> serve anymore wet until I'm absolutely certain it's safe.
>
> How did I miss this? It is??

Here you go:
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.pets.cats.health+behav/msg/2f216915b762a
1f5

--
Lynne

Patty
March 23rd 07, 02:45 AM
On 22 Mar 2007 10:32:40 -0700, Lis wrote:

> On Mar 21, 2:39 pm, Patty > wrote:
>> On 20 Mar 2007 12:55:39 -0700, Lis wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>> This makes no sense. Pressuring them to drop Menu NOW, sure; issuing a
>>> commercial "death penalty" for having trusted a supplier who has
>>> previously always been reliable is nuts. And unless you're prepared to
>>> feed your cat whole ground mouse, you're going to have a tough time
>>> putting together a diet for her that's as balanced and complete as a
>>> premium commercial food.
>>
>>> Lis
>>
>> I've always wondered about this. My Rusty was a born hunter, having been
>> descended from generations of farm cats, and he always preferred what he
>> caught to any canned or bagged food on the market. That said, he is now
>> 16, a wee bit slow on his feet so he doesn't catch what he hunts so much
>> anymore (when he does hunt). Anyhow, until this point in time, he has been
>> the healthiest of cats even though his diet consisted more of wildlife than
>> any commercial food product. So, are there better nutrients in wildlife
>> than say, grocery store chicken? Rusty has never had any problems with
>> hairballs either, I don't recall him ever throwing any up, and he's a
>> domestic long hair. I read once that the rougage the big wild cats get
>> from eating bones and such, takes care of their need for any type of
>> hairball treatment.
>>
>> Oh, and he always liked the mice heads best.
>>
>> Patty
>
> When Rusty eats a mouse, he eats the whole mouse--a complete and
> balanced meal for a cat.

Actually, no. He always ate the head and left the body for me. I would
find headless bodies on the sidewalk along side the house.

> When you feed him grocery store chicken, you feed him parts. Not the
> whole thing, not the parts humans find disgusting, and not the
> contents of the chicken's stomach when it died. You can cook for you
> cat, but you need to remember that your intincts about what's
> nutritious (and tasty and appetizing, but especially nutritious) are
> wrong, because cats are the only domestic animal that's an obligate
> carnivore. There ARE some good cookbooks out there that can give you
> good guidance, but it's a lot of work, and most people simply aren't
> willing to both do all the work, and ignore their instincts in the
> cause of doing it right. (I'd post the titles of those cookbooks if I
> still had any of them; sorry!)
>
> Just cooking chicken for your cat, even including organ meats, is
> simply not as good as a well-tested, premium commercial food, that's
> been carefully developed to both provide a healthy diet for the cat,
> AND not be too disgusting-smelling when opened for people to buy it a
> second time. (Really. Every so often some company gets as far as
> limited market-testing of whole ground mouse. Even true cat lovers
> don't open that second can.)
>
> Lis

Thanks, Lis. That makes sense.

Patty

Patty
March 23rd 07, 02:48 AM
On 22 Mar 2007 13:02:03 -0700, Sherry wrote:

> On Mar 21, 1:39 pm, Patty > wrote:
>>
>> Oh, and he always liked the mice heads best.
>>
>> Patty
>
> Well, the way I understand it, mouse brains are "nutritious and
> delicious." IIRC, that's the main source of taurine.
>
> Sherry

Thanks, Sherry. Guess that's why he liked them best.

Patty

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 02:59 AM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 02:45:50 GMT, Patty > wrote:

> Actually, no. He always ate the head and left the body for me. I would
> find headless bodies on the sidewalk along side the house.

Ah, memories...

I never used to like cats AT ALL until I moved into a very cool house in
college my junior year, with 7 roommates. The girl whose room I moved into
left 2 of her cats behind for 3 months while she travelled abroad. I was
disintereted in them until her very large male, a tuxedo cat named Micah,
took a liking to me. He was such an awesome cat. I was always touched
when he left me headless mice as gifts (I found the first by sitting on
it!). When Patti came back and took her cats, I missed Micah so much that
I went out and got my first kitten.

Lamonte, my kitten, preferred to hunt one of my roommates' fish when he was
little, which didn't please him (the roommate) at all. Come to think of
it, not long after we brought Rudy home, he ate my daughter's beta fish,
who didn't appreciate it AT ALL when I couldn't stop laughing.

--
Lynne

Sherry
March 23rd 07, 04:25 AM
On Mar 22, 3:18 pm, Lynne > wrote:
> on Thu, 22 Mar 2007 20:04:06 GMT, "Sherry" > wrote:
>
> > Well, there's a lot more to it than hacking up raw meat and throwing
> > to the cats. Feeding a raw diet *can* be done right, but just like
> > commercial cat food, there's a formula to follow. It takes a lot of
> > dedication to do it right. Bacteria isn't an issue if safe-handling
> > guidelines are followed.
> > I wouldn't ever do it. It's a lot of work, and very expensive.
>
> I'd buy canned mice for my cats (heck, I buy dead frozen mice for the
> snake), but I'll bet chasing them down and killing them is half the fun of
> consuming them. I imagine that if some bold company were to can mice,
> they'd still have to do something to it in order to make it more appealing
> to kitties.
>
> --
> Lynne

Oh, I'd probably try it too. I bought canned from petfooddirect that
was made out of rabbit meat, thinking OF COURSE they would love it.
Heh. They turned their noses up at it. This is all part of trying to
get Boots to eat *anything*...she is picky, picky and a tiny little
thing. But I bet I'll be much more careful about indiscriminate
purchases of anything-that-looks-like-Boots-might-eat-it. After this
recall fiasco. I'll probably be much more likely to stick to their
regular brand.

Sherry

Gail Futoran
March 23rd 07, 06:36 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 00:00:06 GMT, "Gail Futoran"
> > wrote:
>
>> Serious question about canned food: I'd
>> changed from 100% dry to at least one daily
>> feeding of canned (two daily feddings for
>> the kittens until they reach about 9 months)
>> after starting to read this newsgroup several
>> years ago.
>>
>> None of the cats (except Melosa) will eat
>> much of the canned, preferring dry, but
>> I've persisted. Now I'm wondering if I
>> should forget the canned until this whole
>> recall business is concluded.
>>
>> Anyone have any thoughts on that?
>
> It may be paranoia on both our parts, but I've had the same
> thoughts. Now
> that I know Innova Evo is a Menu Food product, I'm not going to
> serve
> anymore wet until I'm absolutely certain it's safe. I've only used
> 1 can
> out of the last case I purchased, so I really don't have a high
> level of
> comfort based on any "well it hasn't hurt them yet" experiences...
>
> --
> Lynne

My cats never eat that much of the canned,
preferring the dry food, so I'll continue to
offer a variety of different manufacturers
and different flavors. I figure that's
reasonably safe.

This morning Marcus, my only male cat,
followed me into the kitchen squeaking (he
doesn't meow). So I put down some SD
kitten canned for him and Gabby, the other
kitten, and they ate more than usual. I
usually feed them at night, so I guess I'm
going to have to switch to a morning feed.

I am ruled by my cats. ::sigh::

Gail F.

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 07:30 PM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 18:36:04 GMT, "Gail Futoran"
> wrote:

> I am ruled by my cats. ::sigh::

Well then all is right in your universe. :)

--
Lynne