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MoMo via CatKB.com
March 23rd 07, 03:44 PM
There is an article on cnn as well:

http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/03/23/pet.food.recall.ap/index.html

Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??

--
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Matthew
March 23rd 07, 03:52 PM
No the report says the wheat was tainted with it
"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6f9dc4e62939c@uwe...
> There is an article on cnn as well:
>
> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/03/23/pet.food.recall.ap/index.html
>
> Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

MoMo via CatKB.com
March 23rd 07, 03:57 PM
Couldn't someone have tainted the wheat with the rat poison?


Matthew wrote:
>No the report says the wheat was tainted with it
>> There is an article on cnn as well:
>>
>> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/03/23/pet.food.recall.ap/index.html
>>
>> Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??

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Matthew
March 23rd 07, 04:10 PM
More in likely it was done in the fields where it was harvested from by some
farmer taking the easy road out since pesticide regulations are non
existence in other countries


"MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6f9de374a0300@uwe...
> Couldn't someone have tainted the wheat with the rat poison?
>
>
> Matthew wrote:
>>No the report says the wheat was tainted with it
>>> There is an article on cnn as well:
>>>
>>> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/03/23/pet.food.recall.ap/index.html
>>>
>>> Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??
>
> --
> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>

Lis
March 23rd 07, 04:12 PM
On Mar 23, 11:57 am, "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote:
> Couldn't someone have tainted the wheat with the rat poison?
>
> Matthew wrote:
> >No the report says the wheat was tainted with it
> >> There is an article on cnn as well:
>
> >>http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/03/23/pet.food.recall.ap/index.html
>
> >> Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??
>
> --
> Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com

The wheat came from China, where this rat poison is widely used for
rodent control. It's really unlikely that this was an intentional
effort to kill North American pets.

Lis

MoMo via CatKB.com
March 23rd 07, 04:13 PM
Very true.

Matthew wrote:
>More in likely it was done in the fields where it was harvested from by some
>farmer taking the easy road out since pesticide regulations are non
>existence in other countries
>
>> Couldn't someone have tainted the wheat with the rat poison?
>>
>[quoted text clipped - 4 lines]
>>>>
>>>> Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 04:13 PM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 16:10:52 GMT, "Matthew"
> wrote:

> More in likely it was done in the fields where it was harvested from
> by some farmer taking the easy road out since pesticide regulations
> are non existence in other countries

That's what I was thinking, too.

--
Lynne

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 04:14 PM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 16:12:00 GMT, "Lis" > wrote:

> The wheat came from China, where this rat poison is widely used for
> rodent control. It's really unlikely that this was an intentional
> effort to kill North American pets.

It baffles my mind that any country would use rat poison on a crop that is
grown strictly for consumption.

--
Lynne

Patty
March 23rd 07, 05:39 PM
On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 12:10:52 -0400, Matthew wrote:

> More in likely it was done in the fields where it was harvested from by some
> farmer taking the easy road out since pesticide regulations are non
> existence in other countries

Or, as my husband said, it could have been used in the areas where they
store the wheat before shipping it.

Patty

> "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote in message news:6f9de374a0300@uwe...
>> Couldn't someone have tainted the wheat with the rat poison?
>>
>>
>> Matthew wrote:
>>>No the report says the wheat was tainted with it
>>>> There is an article on cnn as well:
>>>>
>>>> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/03/23/pet.food.recall.ap/index.html
>>>>
>>>> Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??
>>
>> --
>> Message posted via http://www.catkb.com
>>

Patty
March 23rd 07, 05:41 PM
On Fri, 23 Mar 2007 11:14:55 -0500, Lynne wrote:

> on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 16:12:00 GMT, "Lis" > wrote:
>
>> The wheat came from China, where this rat poison is widely used for
>> rodent control. It's really unlikely that this was an intentional
>> effort to kill North American pets.
>
> It baffles my mind that any country would use rat poison on a crop that is
> grown strictly for consumption.

Yeah, can you imagine? People eat wheat too! But, China is a third world
country which hasn't caught up to the rest of the developed world yet.

Patty

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 05:54 PM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 17:41:28 GMT, Patty > wrote:

> Yeah, can you imagine? People eat wheat too! But, China is a third
> world country which hasn't caught up to the rest of the developed
> world yet.

China is such an odd paradox that way.

I actually feel very strongly that the US is lax in it's controls on
harmful substances, but that's a whole 'nother can of worms.

--
Lynne

Lynne
March 23rd 07, 05:56 PM
on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 17:39:15 GMT, Patty > wrote:

> Or, as my husband said, it could have been used in the areas where they
> store the wheat before shipping it.

Another very real possibility.

That's not going to stop people from panicking and assuming it was
intentional, though. Which is an awful way for people who were impacted by
this to have to feel. They must be going through the emotional wringer.
What a nightmare.

--
Lynne

Kittie Kat
March 23rd 07, 06:50 PM
On Mar 23, 11:12 am, "Lis" > wrote:
> On Mar 23, 11:57 am, "MoMo via CatKB.com" <u27647@uwe> wrote:
>
> > Couldn't someone have tainted the wheat with the rat poison?
>
> > Matthew wrote:
> > >No the report says the wheat was tainted with it
> > >> There is an article on cnn as well:
>
> > >>http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/03/23/pet.food.recall.ap/index.html
>
> > >> Do you guys think that some sicko could have done this on purpose??
>
> > --
> > Message posted viahttp://www.catkb.com
>
> The wheat came from China, where this rat poison is widely used for
> rodent control. It's really unlikely that this was an intentional
> effort to kill North American pets.
>
> Lis

Yeah, especially since they consume pets themselves.

Kittie Kat
March 23rd 07, 06:57 PM
On Mar 23, 11:14 am, Lynne > wrote:
> on Fri, 23 Mar 2007 16:12:00 GMT, "Lis" > wrote:
>
> > The wheat came from China, where this rat poison is widely used for
> > rodent control. It's really unlikely that this was an intentional
> > effort to kill North American pets.
>
> It baffles my mind that any country would use rat poison on a crop that is
> grown strictly for consumption.
>
> --
> Lynne

These are people who fertilize by going out at night and ****ting all
over food crops. I do not make that up...it's a widespread practice,
and not surprisingly, there's a lot of food-borne illness in China.

If I'd had ANY idea pet food corps were importing from China, for the
love of god I would have been grinding chicken at home.

>From the Humanure Handbook (using humanure is considered a good way to
dispose of human waste, but it's suggested that it should first be
composted; they don't do this in China, though, and call it nightsoil
because sometimes they spread the day's **** at night):

"The second way to deal with human excrement is to apply it raw to
agricultural land. This is popular in Asia where "night soil," or raw
human excrement, is spread on fields. Although this keeps the soil
enriched, it also acts as a vector, or route of transmission, for
disease organisms. In the words of Dr. J. W. Scharff, former chief
health officer in Singapore, "Though the vegetables thrive, the
practice of putting human [manure] directly on the soil is dangerous
to health. The heavy toll of sickness and death from various enteric
diseases in China is well-known." The World Health Organization adds,
"Night soil is sometimes used as a fertilizer, in which case it
presents great hazards by promoting the transmission of food-borne
enteric [intestinal] disease, and hookworm.""

PawsForThought
March 23rd 07, 08:12 PM
On Mar 23, 2:57?pm, "Kittie Kat" > wrote:

> "The second way to deal with human excrement is to apply it raw to
> agricultural land. This is popular in Asia where "night soil," or raw
> human excrement, is spread on fields. Although this keeps the soil
> enriched, it also acts as a vector, or route of transmission, for
> disease organisms. In the words of Dr. J. W. Scharff, former chief
> health officer in Singapore, "Though the vegetables thrive, the
> practice of putting human [manure] directly on the soil is dangerous
> to health. The heavy toll of sickness and death from various enteric
> diseases in China is well-known." The World Health Organization adds,
> "Night soil is sometimes used as a fertilizer, in which case it
> presents great hazards by promoting the transmission of food-borne
> enteric [intestinal] disease, and hookworm.""

Ewww, not that's just gross!

Kittie Kat
March 23rd 07, 09:15 PM
On Mar 23, 3:12 pm, "PawsForThought" > wrote:
> On Mar 23, 2:57?pm, "Kittie Kat" > wrote:
>
> > "The second way to deal with human excrement is to apply it raw to
> > agricultural land. This is popular in Asia where "night soil," or raw
> > human excrement, is spread on fields. Although this keeps the soil
> > enriched, it also acts as a vector, or route of transmission, for
> > disease organisms. In the words of Dr. J. W. Scharff, former chief
> > health officer in Singapore, "Though the vegetables thrive, the
> > practice of putting human [manure] directly on the soil is dangerous
> > to health. The heavy toll of sickness and death from various enteric
> > diseases in China is well-known." The World Health Organization adds,
> > "Night soil is sometimes used as a fertilizer, in which case it
> > presents great hazards by promoting the transmission of food-borne
> > enteric [intestinal] disease, and hookworm.""
>
> Ewww, not that's just gross!

Gross but very true. It's why we shouldn't be buying ANYTHING
consumable from China (or any Asian country that has a history of such
practice). I know the old jokes about things might contain dog meat,
but this is a real issue.

They obviously don't care enough about their own people to put a stop
to it. Why would they care if the rest of the world - pets OR people -
get diseases and worms?

I'm horrified that Menu Foods would even consider buying additives for
pet food from friggin China. Whoever made that decision needs to fry
in hell.

Kittie Kat
March 23rd 07, 09:34 PM
I should clarify that humanure is a movement worldwide, because it
gets rid of waste and provides an endless source of good fertilizer.
But it has to be processed properly because of the pathogens in any
carnivore's feces.

You can go to any sewage plant and get treated sludge to use as
fertilizer. It's very safe, no smell and a lot of people (quietly) use
it. I personally don't, because I have sources of organic fertilizer I
prefer. And to be honest, I have a hard time getting past the idea of
handling everyone's ****, even though it's been processed.

The problem is that in some Asian countries, China in particular, they
use it straight. And they pay a huge price with public health issues.

You'd also be surprised to know that many organic growers use their
own urine as fertilizer. I've used it myself in my compost piles. It's
a fantastic source of nitrogen, and unless you've got a bladder
infection, it's sterile and very safe. Note: I don't advise using it
straight on plants. Too hot. Dilute with water, and many add a few
drops of food coloring so the neighbors won't freak when they see them
watering with what looks like a milk jug of pee.

My cats also contribute to the compost pile with their urine now and
then. Nothing like it to heat up the pile. The great thing about
urine: there's never a shortage.

PawsForThought
March 23rd 07, 11:11 PM
On Mar 23, 4:34?pm, "Kittie Kat" > wrote:
> > You'd also be surprised to know that many organic growers use their
> own urine as fertilizer.

Nooo!!! :( Now why'd you tell me that? I'll never look at my food
the same way, lol.

Kittie Kat
March 24th 07, 03:42 AM
On Mar 23, 6:11 pm, "PawsForThought" > wrote:
> On Mar 23, 4:34?pm, "Kittie Kat" > wrote:
>
> > > You'd also be surprised to know that many organic growers use their
> > own urine as fertilizer.
>
> Nooo!!! :( Now why'd you tell me that? I'll never look at my food
> the same way, lol.

LOL, only if your food comes from your neighbors. I'm pretty sure that
the rules for growers who actually sell their products don't allow
urine. (But I don't know for fact.)