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PawsForThought
March 24th 07, 11:45 PM
This is from the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine that
was prepared as an update for veterinarians. Menu Foods pet food
recall [Print version]

March 23, 2007 (8:30 pm CST)
Content on this page has been provided by the American College of
Veterinary Internal Medicine.

AMERICAN COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
INTERNAL MEDICINE (ACVIM)
1997 Wadsworth Blvd., Suite A
Lakewood, CO 80214-5293
http://www.acvim.org

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 23, 2007

MEDIA CONTACT:
Jenn Armbruster
Communications & Media Relations Manager
303.231.9933 or

PET FOOD RECALL: UPDATED INFORMATION FOR VETERINARIANS
LAKEWOOD, Colo. ? In response to the recent national pet food recall,
the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) has
collected the following information for veterinarians in regards to
the treatment of animals that have ingested the recalled food.

On Friday, March 23, 2007 a press release from the New York State
Department of Agriculture and Markets (www.agmkt.state.ny.us/release)
stated that the New York State Agriculture Commissioner Patrick Hooker
and Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine Dean Donald F.
Smith announced that scientists at the New York State Food Laboratory
identified Aminopterin as a toxin present in cat food samples from
Menu Foods, the manufacturer of the many brands of dog and cat food
that are currently the subject of a nationwide recall.

The Food Laboratory received the pet food samples from a toxicologist
at the New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Center at Cornell
University, where testing has been underway to try to identify the
cause of kidney failure in dogs and cats that consumed the recalled
brands of pet food. At Cornell's request, the Food Laboratory tested
the samples for poisons and toxins, and identified Aminopterin in the
pet food samples at a level of at least 40 parts per million.

Aminopterin is a folic acid inhibitor found in some rodentacides
available outside the USA. It is not available in the US as a
rodentacide. Aminopterin is a 4-amino analog of folic acid. It was
originally used as an antineoplastic agent in the late 1940's but has
been superseded by methotrexate, a related but less toxic folic acid
analog. At high doses, methotrexate results in acute renal failure and
crystalluria due to desposition of 7-hydroxymethotrexate in the renal
tubules. Aminopterin toxicity is thought to be similar and dose
dependent.

These findings and any relationship to recent pet deaths have not been
confirmed by the Food and Drug Administration. An announcement from
the FDA is forthcoming. We need to be cautious as the finding of
Aminopterin is significant but there could be other compounds yet
unknown in the diet as well.

Recommendations for testing animals have essentially not changed.
There is no blood test available for Aminopterin. Pets that have eaten
the recalled food whether showing signs of illness (lethargy,
vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, etc) or asymptomatic should be seen by
their veterinarian and have a complete blood count, biochemistry panel
and urinalysis performed. Additional testing may include assessment
for significant proteinuria, urine culture, imaging, etc.

Treatment recommendations have not changed. According to Dr. Richard E
Goldstein DVM DACVIM DECVIM-CA, Associate Professor of Medicine at
Cornell University, azotemic pets should be treated with fluids to
promote hydration, and diuresis in order to dissolve and flush out
crystals from the tubules. Aminopterin produces crystals within the
renal tubules that are most soluble in an acidic urine pH thus a
target urine pH above 7 (achieved with fluid therapy and alkalinizing
agents including sodium bicarbonate) might be beneficial in managing
these patients. Several medications such as antioxidants and folic
acid may be administered but their true beneficial affects are
unproven when given long after the initial exposure to the toxin.

Bone-marrow suppression is a concern with any folic acid inhibiting
agent and a complete blood cell count should be monitored in these
patients as well as renal function.

If a patient with anuric or oliguric acute renal failure is not
responding to appropriate therapy, veterinarians should promptly
consider contacting a small animal internist with the American College
of Veterinary Internal Medicine (www.ACVIM.org) in their local
community for case consultation and possible referral. Hemodialysis
can be utilized for severely affected patients and is available at a
limited number of veterinary teaching hospitals.

Duration of treatment in patients which may have renal failure due to
ingestion of the recalled food is unknown at this time and obviously
will vary between patients. Long term effects on renal function are
unknown but based on limited experience to date, at least partial
renal recovery is anticipated. Patients succumbing to illness should
be necropsied and tissues saved in formalin for histopathology to
determine cause of death.

Samples for histopathology can be submitted to The Iowa State
University Veterinary Diagnostic laboratory (www.vdpam.iastate.edu) or
The Animal Health Diagnostic Center (AHDC) at Cornell University
(www.diag.center.vetcornell.edu).

Samples of the recalled food should be held for possible analysis.
Opened food should be disposed of so there is no chance of further
consumption. Pet owners can contact the Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) Consumer Complaint Coordinator at: http://www.fda.gov/opacom/backgrounders/complain.html.

The FDA has provided the following case definition for field
investigation/cases: veterinary-documented renal failure, necropsy
results if animal died, food consumed within 1 week of death
(illness), and intact, unopened cans of the food. If veterinarians
suspect that a case meets this general case definition, FDA has
requested that you contact them at the following e-mail address:


Please continue to advise that your clients consult www.menufoods.com/recall
for a list of the recalled food. They should stop feeding the food
immediately.

Also consult www.avma.org for the most up-to-date information.

ACVIM is the national certifying organization for veterinary
specialists in large and small animal internal medicine, cardiology,
neurology and oncology. Established in 1973, ACVIM's purpose is to
advance the knowledge of animal health and diseases, and to foster the
continued development of specialty veterinary care. To find an ACVIM
Specialist in your area, please visit www.ACVIM.org."

cybercat
March 27th 07, 01:52 AM
"PawsForThought" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> This is from the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine that
> was prepared as an update for veterinarians. Menu Foods pet food
> recall [Print version]
>
> March 23, 2007 (8:30 pm CST)
> Content on this page has been provided by the American College of
> Veterinary Internal Medicine.
>
> AMERICAN COLLEGE OF VETERINARY
> INTERNAL MEDICINE (ACVIM)
> 1997 Wadsworth Blvd., Suite A
> Lakewood, CO 80214-5293
> http://www.acvim.org
>
> FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
> March 23, 2007
>
[snips good stuff]

Really good, specific information. I probably will never use
any pet food that contains ingredients from overseas, that is
if I can ascertain that it does.