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Joey Goggles
March 27th 07, 02:56 PM
My wife and I have had 2 littermates since they were kittens
(females) . In the last 6 months or so, we acquired a stray (male)
from our daughter's neighborhood that has exhibited aggressive
behaviour toward the girls. All have been neutered.

He tends to attack them after exiting the litter box area. Sometimes
he will wait for them to pass by and swipe at them with his paws ( his
claws aren't extended )

Lately he's becomming more aggressive. We were wondering if this is
normal, and if we can break this behaviour.

Thanks.

Cat Protector
March 28th 07, 01:48 AM
This cat is just asserting his dominance which is normal behavior. Guessing
that you slowly introduced this newcomer to the household, the best thing to
do is let the cats work this out. As long as there is no bloodshed they
should establish his ranking. My cat Icarus is the only male amongst two
females and he constantly tries to push their buttons because he's the
youngest and also an alpha male. He's also learned that he isn't the top cat
in the household but that never stops him from pushing the envelope
sometimes.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com
"Joey Goggles" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> My wife and I have had 2 littermates since they were kittens
> (females) . In the last 6 months or so, we acquired a stray (male)
> from our daughter's neighborhood that has exhibited aggressive
> behaviour toward the girls. All have been neutered.
>
> He tends to attack them after exiting the litter box area. Sometimes
> he will wait for them to pass by and swipe at them with his paws ( his
> claws aren't extended )
>
> Lately he's becomming more aggressive. We were wondering if this is
> normal, and if we can break this behaviour.
>
> Thanks.
>

Joey Goggles
March 28th 07, 01:17 PM
On Mar 27, 8:48 pm, "Cat Protector" > wrote:
> This cat is just asserting his dominance which is normal behavior. Guessing
> that you slowly introduced this newcomer to the household, the best thing to
> do is let the cats work this out. As long as there is no bloodshed they
> should establish his ranking. My cat Icarus is the only male amongst two
> females and he constantly tries to push their buttons because he's the
> youngest and also an alpha male. He's also learned that he isn't the top cat
> in the household but that never stops him from pushing the envelope
> sometimes.
>
> --
> Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!www.catgalaxymedia.com
>
> Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!www.panthertekit.com"Joey Goggles" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
>
>
> > My wife and I have had 2 littermates since they were kittens
> > (females) . In the last 6 months or so, we acquired a stray (male)
> > from our daughter's neighborhood that has exhibited aggressive
> > behaviour toward the girls. All have been neutered.
>
> > He tends to attack them after exiting the litter box area. Sometimes
> > he will wait for them to pass by and swipe at them with his paws ( his
> > claws aren't extended )
>
> > Lately he's becomming more aggressive. We were wondering if this is
> > normal, and if we can break this behaviour.
>
> > Thanks.- Hide quoted text -
>
- Show quoted text -

Thanks for the reply!

My wife was working from home yesterday, Diego, ( the new male) didn't
bother either Kate or Allie. My wife's convinced that they do this for
our entertainment.... ! Go figure!

Thanks Again!!

Rene S.
March 28th 07, 02:53 PM
On Mar 27, 8:56 am, "Joey Goggles" > wrote:
> My wife and I have had 2 littermates since they were kittens
> (females) . In the last 6 months or so, we acquired a stray (male)
> from our daughter's neighborhood that has exhibited aggressive
> behaviour toward the girls. All have been neutered.
>
> He tends to attack them after exiting the litter box area. Sometimes
> he will wait for them to pass by and swipe at them with his paws ( his
> claws aren't extended )

In order to prevent any possible litter box issues, I'd suggest
putting another litterbox or two in different areas of the home. If
the male is bothering the other cats, even in a playful way, they
might find other places to eliminate if they feel threatened. You
should have at least three boxes (even better is four) with three cats
anyway.

Cat Protector
March 28th 07, 06:46 PM
A good idea but if the guy lives in an apartment or doesn't have a lot of
space that might not be an option. All of the litterboxes here are in the
bathroom next to each other. So, far it's worked out pretty well. None of
the cats have any litterbox issues.

--
Cat Galaxy: All Cats! All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of Your Computer Needs!
www.panthertekit.com


"Rene S." > wrote in message
oups.com...

> In order to prevent any possible litter box issues, I'd suggest
> putting another litterbox or two in different areas of the home. If
> the male is bothering the other cats, even in a playful way, they
> might find other places to eliminate if they feel threatened. You
> should have at least three boxes (even better is four) with three cats
> anyway.
>
>

Joey Goggles
March 28th 07, 07:43 PM
On Mar 28, 9:53 am, "Rene S." > wrote:
> On Mar 27, 8:56 am, "Joey Goggles" > wrote:
>
> > My wife and I have had 2 littermates since they were kittens
> > (females) . In the last 6 months or so, we acquired a stray (male)
> > from our daughter's neighborhood that has exhibited aggressive
> > behaviour toward the girls. All have been neutered.
>
> > He tends to attack them after exiting the litter box area. Sometimes
> > he will wait for them to pass by and swipe at them with his paws ( his
> > claws aren't extended )
>
> In order to prevent any possible litter box issues, I'd suggest
> putting another litterbox or two in different areas of the home. If
> the male is bothering the other cats, even in a playful way, they
> might find other places to eliminate if they feel threatened. You
> should have at least three boxes (even better is four) with three cats
> anyway.

We don't have a lot of space to choose from in our home. We have no
basement,
and the bathrooms are very tight on space.
I might be able to put one in the upstairs bath, but i'm not sure it
will help the issue.

cybercat
March 28th 07, 08:52 PM
"Joey Goggles" > wrote
>
> We don't have a lot of space to choose from in our home. We have no
> basement,
> and the bathrooms are very tight on space.
> I might be able to put one in the upstairs bath, but i'm not sure it
> will help the issue.
>
>

I never put my litter boxes in the bathroom. I have one in our
utility room and one in the master bedroom behind a fireplace
screen, in a quiet corner where the cats feel safe, and from which
they can make a hasty escape if need be.

The point about making sure your cats have boxes they are
comfortable using (e.g. not getting ambushed etc.) is, once
they stop using them, it is very hard to get them to start
again consistently. You definitely need at least two boxes
or you are going to have a problem on your hands.

It is not your girls' fault this boy is behaving this way, so
be sure they do not suffer. Make 2-3 boxes available, keep them
scooped, and forget conventions about where to put them.

(Aside from the bath having quite a bit of traffic from humans, and
closed doors at some times when the cat needs to go, it is just
disgusting to me to share a bath with a cat box. Put the boxes in
places that are low traffic but easy to get at, with good escape
routes, and some space around them for ventilation. A utility
room, a corner of a dining room that is not used, even. Your
study or den, heck, I had one in my living room behind a
plant when I lived in a one bedroom apartment. I kept it clean
and nobody knew it was there but me and the cat.

Think outside the box! ;)

Rene S.
March 28th 07, 09:32 PM
> We don't have a lot of space to choose from in our home. We have no
> basement,
> and the bathrooms are very tight on space.
> I might be able to put one in the upstairs bath, but i'm not sure it
> will help the issue.

How about in a spare closet? I did this when I lived in a one-bedroom
apartment. I left the door open a crack and no one but me knew the box
was in there. Other options are in the corner of a spare room, end of
a hallway, or do you have a pantry that's big enough?

Joey Goggles
March 29th 07, 01:50 PM
On Mar 28, 3:52 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
>
> Think outside the box! ;)

As long as it's me doing the thinking and not them doing anything at
all!!!! :-)

Thanks!

Joey Goggles
March 29th 07, 01:51 PM
On Mar 28, 4:32 pm, "Rene S." > wrote:
> > We don't have a lot of space to choose from in our home. We have no
> > basement,
> > and the bathrooms are very tight on space.
> > I might be able to put one in the upstairs bath, but i'm not sure it
> > will help the issue.
>
> How about in a spare closet? I did this when I lived in a one-bedroom
> apartment. I left the door open a crack and no one but me knew the box
> was in there. Other options are in the corner of a spare room, end of
> a hallway, or do you have a pantry that's big enough?

the closet..... HMMMMMM.....

Annie Wxill
March 29th 07, 05:17 PM
"Joey Goggles" > wrote in message
oups.com...
....> . I might be able to put one in the upstairs bath, but i'm not sure it
will help the issue.
>
Hi Joey,

The only way to know if it will work or not is to do it and see. Don't be
in too big a hurry for an answer because it might take a while for the cats
to make the transition.

Good luck.

Annie