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svu geek
March 28th 07, 11:31 AM
I have noticed that sometimes my older cat (9 y/o) will stop breathing
for a short time. What will happen is that he'll be sleeping on the
bed and I'll look over at him and I'll notice that his chest and side
isn't rising and falling which to me indicates that he isn't
breathing. I'll look extra hard and then after 30 seconds I freak out
and shake him because he's perfectly still and not moving at all which
makes me think he's dead. At that time he starts breathing again.

This doesn't happen all the time but it seems to be happening more. It
actually just happened which is why I decided to ask about this. I'll
make sure to call the vet but I doubt they'll be able to get us in
this week. I've heard they are very busy due to the pet food recall.
My cat does have a heart murmur and elevated kidney levels. Other than
that he is healthy and playful.

Is this sort of thing normal? Or is it definitely something to look
into? BTW, he doesn't usually snore.

cindys
March 28th 07, 12:57 PM
"svu geek" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I have noticed that sometimes my older cat (9 y/o) will stop breathing
> for a short time. What will happen is that he'll be sleeping on the
> bed and I'll look over at him and I'll notice that his chest and side
> isn't rising and falling which to me indicates that he isn't
> breathing. I'll look extra hard and then after 30 seconds I freak out
> and shake him because he's perfectly still and not moving at all which
> makes me think he's dead. At that time he starts breathing again.
>
> This doesn't happen all the time but it seems to be happening more. It
> actually just happened which is why I decided to ask about this. I'll
> make sure to call the vet but I doubt they'll be able to get us in
> this week. I've heard they are very busy due to the pet food recall.
> My cat does have a heart murmur and elevated kidney levels. Other than
> that he is healthy and playful.
>
> Is this sort of thing normal? Or is it definitely something to look
> into? BTW, he doesn't usually snore.
-----------
I am not a veterinarian, but my guess would be that if humans can get sleep
apnea, why not cats? The problem is that in humans, this condition is
generally treated with a CPAP machine. Now, just try to convince Fluffy that
he needs to wear this contraption:

http://www.aftonmedical.com/cpap.h1.jpg

Another way to treat sleep apnea in humans is with weight loss. I don't know
if your kitty is overweight.

Sometimes, humans are also treated with special dental appliances, called
"mouth guards" (Here is a link to an image of a human mouth guard called
"the Silencer." I don't think you're going to convince Fluffy that he needs
to wear one of these deals, even if a cat dentist would take an impression
of his teeth and custom-make one for him):

http://www.the-silencer.com/images/pro1.jpg

One of my extended families members has chronic atrial fibrillation (heart
is not in proper cardiac rhythm and heart valves sometimes flutter) and
sleep apnea. She is overweight and refuses to wear a CPAP. The doctor has
stated that he will not be able to keep her heart in regular rhythm (it goes
in and out of atrial fib) unless she simultaneously treats her sleep apnea.
Despite the fact that she has untreated sleep apnea, you should know that
her atrial fibrillation fortunately has NOT progressed in several years. Of
course, it would be better if she would agree to use the CPAP, and then the
doctor could cardiovert her back to normal rhythm (and have a good chance of
keeping it there!), but that's not going to happen any time soon. She has
probably had this for condition for years. She is 83 years old and is still
going strong.

It will be very interesting to hear what your vet has to say about this, so
please post back after your appointment.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

JohnR66
March 28th 07, 06:06 PM
"svu geek" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I have noticed that sometimes my older cat (9 y/o) will stop breathing
> for a short time. What will happen is that he'll be sleeping on the
> bed and I'll look over at him and I'll notice that his chest and side
> isn't rising and falling which to me indicates that he isn't
> breathing. I'll look extra hard and then after 30 seconds I freak out
> and shake him because he's perfectly still and not moving at all which
> makes me think he's dead. At that time he starts breathing again.
>
> This doesn't happen all the time but it seems to be happening more. It
> actually just happened which is why I decided to ask about this. I'll
> make sure to call the vet but I doubt they'll be able to get us in
> this week. I've heard they are very busy due to the pet food recall.
> My cat does have a heart murmur and elevated kidney levels. Other than
> that he is healthy and playful.
>
> Is this sort of thing normal? Or is it definitely something to look
> into? BTW, he doesn't usually snore.
>

I'ved noticed my cat doing this sometimes. I think it is just a stage in
their sleep when they breath too shallow to see. The fun part is when they
start dreaming where they shutter, twitch and even meow.
John