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JonM
March 31st 07, 11:04 PM
Greetings --

For the past five years I have had a neutered male cat. In the last
six months or so he has started spraying all over the house. He never
exhibited this behavior before, even when I lived in an apartment and
he was quite obviously miserable at being confined. He is a healthy,
active indoor-outdoor cat who insists on going out all times of the
year, in all weather conditions. I have another cat with whom he gets
along and who was here since before I got the cat in question. This
cat, also a neutered male, has never sprayed in the more than 10 years
that I've had him.

While I have only one litter box, there are no issues with the cats
sharing it, as the "spraying" cat has always preferred the outdoors
since I moved into a house. There have been no environmental changes
(no new cats, no people come or gone) that I am aware of that might
have triggered this behavior. The problem is serious, as he sprays
several times a day, leaving the odor of urine throughout the house.

I have the impression (but obviously don't know for sure) that he is
spraying only in my presence. That is, he seems to spray when he
wants attention that he is not getting or he is agitated about
something (which is frequent, he is a high-strung and highly
interactive cat), for example, when trying to wake me in the morning.

I have taken him to the vet who confirmed that there is no discernible
medical problem.

I would be grateful for any thoughts on what might have triggered this
behavior and what can be done about it.

-- Jon M

sheelagh
April 1st 07, 12:55 AM
On 31 Mar, 23:04, JonM wrote:
> Greetings --
>
> For the past five years I have had a neutered male cat. In the last
> six months or so he has started spraying all over the house. He never
> exhibited this behavior before, even when I lived in an apartment and
> he was quite obviously miserable at being confined. He is a healthy,
> active indoor-outdoor cat who insists on going out all times of the
> year, in all weather conditions. I have another cat with whom he gets
> along and who was here since before I got the cat in question. This
> cat, also a neutered male, has never sprayed in the more than 10 years
> that I've had him.
>
> While I have only one litter box, there are no issues with the cats
> sharing it, as the "spraying" cat has always preferred the outdoors
> since I moved into a house. There have been no environmental changes
> (no new cats, no people come or gone) that I am aware of that might
> have triggered this behavior. The problem is serious, as he sprays
> several times a day, leaving the odor of urine throughout the house.
>
> I have the impression (but obviously don't know for sure) that he is
> spraying only in my presence. That is, he seems to spray when he
> wants attention that he is not getting or he is agitated about
> something (which is frequent, he is a high-strung and highly
> interactive cat), for example, when trying to wake me in the morning.
>
> I have taken him to the vet who confirmed that there is no discernible
> medical problem.
>
> I would be grateful for any thoughts on what might have triggered this
> behavior and what can be done about it.
>
> -- Jon M

The only thing that I can think of that you have changed in the
recent past is the location of where you live. as you pointed out, he
was fine in your apartment/flat?
When a cat spray's, he does it to let other cats know that he is
around.
With no access to other cats, there was no reason to ensure that
others needed to know that he was around, because as you point out,
your other neuter doesn't spray at all.

I have a feeling that now that you have moved into a house with a
garden, or at least somewhere where you feel that it is safe to let
him out, he has come into contact with other spraying males in the
same area as you, & now that he can smell other males spraying, he is
masking.
Masking is when one cat sprays an area to let other cats know who is
around & dominant in that area. I have a feeling that all he is doing
is covering those scent's with his own spraying, to ensure that all
the locals know that he has moved in, & that from now on, it will be
his area & he intends to defend it.

I don't think that he is doing it in front of you on purpose to wind
you up. It may feel that way, but it is an instinct thing with tom
cats. & simply the easiest way of ensuring that everyone in the house
and around he garden knows that this is HIS PLACE, & he intends to
defend it.

I commiserate with you too, because i have just had 2cats neutered, &
suffer with the same problem. A late neuter can be very difficult to
dissuade from his previous habits, even though it has been some years
since he has been nurtured, old habits die hard, & in his case, he
seems to recognise the smell, & is only doing what comes naturally. If
it feel like he is only doing it in front of you, it could be that he
is trying to assure you that he is on top of things..

I think that you can stop a neuter from doing it, but it is a hard
long road.
My only short term advice is to think about stud pants for him. There
is a product on the market,( I have never tried it, but it does come
highly recommended), that breaks down the enzymes in the spray which
takes away the reason for him to mark the same area again & again,
because that is what he is trying to do-refresh his scent in all the
places that he has marked previously.

http://www.urine-off.com/page.aspx?page_id=33&gclid=CIqAnI2aoIsCFQrlQgodzhU5kg



When people tell you to neuter before they become sexually mature,
this is the reason why. @ around 6 month old, they do start marking
the area so that any passing females also know that they are around.
In his case, even though he is incapable, the old habit is there &
difficult to stop him thinking that he needs to.

http://www.sniksnak.com/cathealth/marking.html

http://www.cozycatfurniture.com/cat_newsletters/catnewsletter8.html
I hope that the links are helpful to you
& good luck too
S;o)

Sherry
April 1st 07, 04:33 AM
On Mar 31, 5:04 pm, JonM wrote:
> Greetings --
>
> For the past five years I have had a neutered male cat. In the last
> six months or so he has started spraying all over the house. He never
> exhibited this behavior before, even when I lived in an apartment and
> he was quite obviously miserable at being confined. He is a healthy,
> active indoor-outdoor cat who insists on going out all times of the
> year, in all weather conditions. I have another cat with whom he gets
> along and who was here since before I got the cat in question. This
> cat, also a neutered male, has never sprayed in the more than 10 years
> that I've had him.
>
> While I have only one litter box, there are no issues with the cats
> sharing it, as the "spraying" cat has always preferred the outdoors
> since I moved into a house. There have been no environmental changes
> (no new cats, no people come or gone) that I am aware of that might
> have triggered this behavior. The problem is serious, as he sprays
> several times a day, leaving the odor of urine throughout the house.
>
> I have the impression (but obviously don't know for sure) that he is
> spraying only in my presence. That is, he seems to spray when he
> wants attention that he is not getting or he is agitated about
> something (which is frequent, he is a high-strung and highly
> interactive cat), for example, when trying to wake me in the morning.
>
> I have taken him to the vet who confirmed that there is no discernible
> medical problem.
>
> I would be grateful for any thoughts on what might have triggered this
> behavior and what can be done about it.
>
> -- Jon M

Try Feliway. You won't see an abrupt stop, it does work with
behavioral spraying. I have one old cat who occasionaly does this,
pretty rarely but he does it. Over the years I've noticed he only does
it in the spring.
There could be other cats hanging around that you haven't noticed,
too. That'll make my daughters neutered cat spray.
Sherry

IBen Getiner
April 2nd 07, 09:19 AM
On Mar 31, 6:04�pm, JonM wrote:
> Greetings --
>
> For the past five years I have had a neutered male cat. *In the last
> six months or so he has started spraying all over the house. *He never
> exhibited this behavior before, even when I lived in an apartment and
> he was quite obviously miserable at being confined. *He is a healthy,
> active indoor-outdoor cat who insists on going out all times of the
> year, in all weather conditions. *I have another cat with whom he gets
> along and who was here since before I got the cat in question. *This
> cat, also a neutered male, has never sprayed in the more than 10 years
> that I've had him.
>
> While I have only one litter box, there are no issues with the cats
> sharing it, as the "spraying" cat has always preferred the outdoors
> since I moved into a house. *There have been no environmental changes
> (no new cats, no people come or gone) that I am aware of that might
> have triggered this behavior. *The problem is serious, as he sprays
> several times a day, leaving the odor of urine throughout the house.
>
> I have the impression (but obviously don't know for sure) that he is
> spraying only in my presence. *That is, he seems to spray when he
> wants attention that he is not getting or he is agitated about
> something (which is frequent, he is a high-strung and highly
> interactive cat), for example, when trying to wake me in the morning.
>
> I have taken him to the vet who confirmed that there is no discernible
> medical problem.
>
> I would be grateful for any thoughts on what might have triggered this
> behavior and what can be done about it.
>
> -- Jon M

Your boy is just scent-marking his 'territory', Jon. Just like he does
when he cheeks you on the big toe. You didn't actually think he was
being affectionate, did you? Get this straight... everything a cat
does is for their own personal gains. That is unless you have a really
smart cat that's as eager to please as ours is.
No... there's not much you can do about it now. Not much other than to
set him up with one of those horrible sex-mutilation operations.
You've let him outside, you see. My advice is to learn to live with
it.


IBen Getiner

IBen Getiner
April 2nd 07, 09:43 AM
On Mar 31, 6:04�pm, JonM wrote:
> Greetings --
>
> For the past five years I have had a neutered male cat. *In the last
> six months or so he has started spraying all over the house. *He never
> exhibited this behavior before, even when I lived in an apartment and
> he was quite obviously miserable at being confined. *He is a healthy,
> active indoor-outdoor cat who insists on going out all times of the
> year, in all weather conditions. *I have another cat with whom he gets
> along and who was here since before I got the cat in question. *This
> cat, also a neutered male, has never sprayed in the more than 10 years
> that I've had him.
>
> While I have only one litter box, there are no issues with the cats
> sharing it, as the "spraying" cat has always preferred the outdoors
> since I moved into a house. *There have been no environmental changes
> (no new cats, no people come or gone) that I am aware of that might
> have triggered this behavior. *The problem is serious, as he sprays
> several times a day, leaving the odor of urine throughout the house.
>
> I have the impression (but obviously don't know for sure) that he is
> spraying only in my presence. *That is, he seems to spray when he
> wants attention that he is not getting or he is agitated about
> something (which is frequent, he is a high-strung and highly
> interactive cat), for example, when trying to wake me in the morning.
>
> I have taken him to the vet who confirmed that there is no discernible
> medical problem.
>
> I would be grateful for any thoughts on what might have triggered this
> behavior and what can be done about it.
>
> -- Jon M

Oh.... I see that you've already gone thru with the operation. Well,
if he was an outside cat as well as an inside one, I guess I can
understand that. I know it's too late for this now, but what you
should have done would have been to relocate him inside on a permanent
basis. Then again, we tried to bring a new-comer into our home from
outside once and she hated it. We finally let her stay outside, and
she was much happier. I was going to say that you deserve what you get
for subjecting your cat to the barbarity of the operation, but I guess
I can't find any real strikes against you. Still, you have a problem.
And one that isn't going away anytime soon. I've heard of tom-cats
that still sprayed after being operated on before. How does his spray
smell? Does it reek so strong that it hangs a burning sensation in the
back of your nose like the most powerful garlic? I've always wondered
whether males who still sprayed after being neutered continued to post
that ultra-rank, burning scent or not... Good luck with your
endeavor. Sorry I can't help.

IBen Getiner

IBen Getiner
April 2nd 07, 09:48 AM
On Apr 1, 5:41?pm,
Human_And_Animal_Behavior_Forensic_Sciences_Resear
wrote:
> HOWEDY JonM,


<snip>


Too much jabber. And you're posting from Hotmail...?? LOL...!! Okay..



IBen Getiner

April 8th 07, 02:09 AM
JonM wrote in :

>
> For the past five years I have had a neutered male cat. In the last
> six months or so he has started spraying all over the house. He never
> exhibited this behavior before,

I went through the same thing. Two neutered male cats (indoor-only,
though) who grew up together. At about 7 years, one started spraying and
one didn't. No changes to the environment or household to explain it, so
we did all sorts of tests to see if there was a medical or physiological
reason. None were found. Feliway did no good. So my vet suggested we
try an anti-anxiety drug. The first one did no good. The second -- I
think amitriptyline (Elavil) -- worked, but it made him seem drugged and
sedated. So we then tried fluoxetine (Prozac) -- and it has worked like
a charm for a couple of years now. No spraying, no noticeable ill-
effects on his demeanor or personality.

He gets a very tiny amount. The smallest dosage you can buy of
fluoxetine (in the US anyway) is 10 mg. My cat -- who is about 14 pounds
-- gets just 2.5 mg every OTHER day. In other words, I have to split the
pill into quarters. It's a very small pill, too, so you will need a pill
splitter to do it.

Talk to your vet and see if he or she thinks fluoxetine is worth a try.
Good luck.

JEP