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April 4th 07, 01:38 AM
Our 11 year old cat who is usually pretty spry just lies around
everyday and doesn't eat as much and is losing weight. She has
increased thirst too. All of this sounds like diabetes, but she has
also lost her voice. She doesn't purr anymore and when she does meow
(which isn't very often anymore), she sounds really hoarse and it
usually either sounds like a little squeak or kind of a hiss. She
doesn't seem to have any pain anywhere in her body. We've got her an
appointment with the vet, but we tried to put it off for a while
hoping it was just a cold or something, because it's so traumatic for
her to go to the vet, and we hate putting her through that. Does
anyone have any idea what might be wrong with her? I'd just like to
hear some guesses before her appointment tommorow. Thanks!

Matthew
April 4th 07, 01:49 AM
Could be damage to the throat
a tumor
diabetes
many possibilities

Make sure you list all the symptoms so the vet knows

Was the furball exposed to the any bad pet food list in mass pet food recall

> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Our 11 year old cat who is usually pretty spry just lies around
> everyday and doesn't eat as much and is losing weight. She has
> increased thirst too. All of this sounds like diabetes, but she has
> also lost her voice. She doesn't purr anymore and when she does meow
> (which isn't very often anymore), she sounds really hoarse and it
> usually either sounds like a little squeak or kind of a hiss. She
> doesn't seem to have any pain anywhere in her body. We've got her an
> appointment with the vet, but we tried to put it off for a while
> hoping it was just a cold or something, because it's so traumatic for
> her to go to the vet, and we hate putting her through that. Does
> anyone have any idea what might be wrong with her? I'd just like to
> hear some guesses before her appointment tommorow. Thanks!
>

Gail
April 4th 07, 02:32 AM
She needs to see a vet ASAP. Don't delay.
Gail
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Our 11 year old cat who is usually pretty spry just lies around
> everyday and doesn't eat as much and is losing weight. She has
> increased thirst too. All of this sounds like diabetes, but she has
> also lost her voice. She doesn't purr anymore and when she does meow
> (which isn't very often anymore), she sounds really hoarse and it
> usually either sounds like a little squeak or kind of a hiss. She
> doesn't seem to have any pain anywhere in her body. We've got her an
> appointment with the vet, but we tried to put it off for a while
> hoping it was just a cold or something, because it's so traumatic for
> her to go to the vet, and we hate putting her through that. Does
> anyone have any idea what might be wrong with her? I'd just like to
> hear some guesses before her appointment tommorow. Thanks!
>

tension_on_the_wire
April 4th 07, 03:08 AM
On Apr 3, 5:38 pm, wrote:
> Our 11 year old cat who is usually pretty spry just lies around
> everyday and doesn't eat as much and is losing weight. She has
> increased thirst too. All of this sounds like diabetes, but she has
> also lost her voice. She doesn't purr anymore and when she does meow
> (which isn't very often anymore), she sounds really hoarse and it
> usually either sounds like a little squeak or kind of a hiss. She
> doesn't seem to have any pain anywhere in her body. We've got her an
> appointment with the vet, but we tried to put it off for a while
> hoping it was just a cold or something, because it's so traumatic for
> her to go to the vet, and we hate putting her through that. Does
> anyone have any idea what might be wrong with her? I'd just like to
> hear some guesses before her appointment tommorow. Thanks!

Good luck with your appointment tomorrow. Don't be surprised if they
want to check her thyroid levels. Hyperthyroidism can cause rapid and
significant weight loss in older cats, and also causes hypertension
which results in larger amounts of urine loss from pressure effects in
the kidneys. I'm not sure about the voice, but the thyroid is in the
neck region, and if there is a mass effect in the neck, it could
theoretically affect both the thyroid and the larynx.

Diabetes is still a strong contender too, and more reason to go sooner
rather than later since it can occasionally present as a silent
killer, even in people, where the diagnosis gets made after someone
passed away in their bed. Fortunately you already have an appointment
made. Weight loss in cats should always be attended to immediately,
since they can die quite quickly even from plain digestive complaints
that result in a biochemical storm known as fatty liver. Is your cat
at all overweight to begin with?

--tension

Meghan Noecker
April 4th 07, 11:35 AM
On 3 Apr 2007 17:38:31 -0700, wrote:

> Our 11 year old cat who is usually pretty spry just lies around
>everyday and doesn't eat as much and is losing weight. She has
>increased thirst too. All of this sounds like diabetes, but she has
>also lost her voice. She doesn't purr anymore and when she does meow
>(which isn't very often anymore), she sounds really hoarse and it
>usually either sounds like a little squeak or kind of a hiss. She
>doesn't seem to have any pain anywhere in her body. We've got her an
>appointment with the vet, but we tried to put it off for a while
>hoping it was just a cold or something, because it's so traumatic for
>her to go to the vet, and we hate putting her through that. Does
>anyone have any idea what might be wrong with her? I'd just like to
>hear some guesses before her appointment tommorow. Thanks!


Defintely sounds like you need bloodwork done.

Kira had these symptoms too, and she was anemic. She fought it all
summer and then suddenly developed kidney failure and died iin
October.

When it started, I described her as lethargic, not eating, and her
meow-er was broken. I don't know how to spell it, but I say the meow
as one syllable, but spelled that way looks like a lawn mower.

Anyway, he mouth opened a lot, but very little came out.

Moongal
April 4th 07, 12:34 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Our 11 year old cat who is usually pretty spry just lies around
> everyday and doesn't eat as much and is losing weight. She has
> increased thirst too. All of this sounds like diabetes, but she has
> also lost her voice. She doesn't purr anymore and when she does meow
> (which isn't very often anymore), she sounds really hoarse and it
> usually either sounds like a little squeak or kind of a hiss. She
> doesn't seem to have any pain anywhere in her body. We've got her an
> appointment with the vet, but we tried to put it off for a while
> hoping it was just a cold or something, because it's so traumatic for
> her to go to the vet, and we hate putting her through that. Does
> anyone have any idea what might be wrong with her? I'd just like to
> hear some guesses before her appointment tommorow. Thanks!
>

You should definately get some blood work done. My cat has those same
symptoms, he has kidney failure and he's anemic, but without the blood work
it's hard to tell for sure because those symptoms can apply to other things
too and you need to know so you can treat your cat properly.

Good luck, I hope it's something that can be cured.

April 4th 07, 10:38 PM
On Apr 4, 7:34 am, "Moongal" > wrote:
>> You should definately get some blood work done. My cat has those same
> symptoms, he has kidney failure and he's anemic, but without the blood work
> it's hard to tell for sure because those symptoms can apply to other things
> too and you need to know so you can treat your cat properly.
>
> Good luck, I hope it's something that can be cured.

Well, it's not good news. According to the vet, she's a very sick
cat. She has some sort of auto-immune problem and she's severly
anemic. Basically now we have no choice but to give her steroids
twice a day that will either make her better, or, if she has a kidney
or liver problem, make her worse, and kill her.

Matthew
April 4th 07, 10:43 PM
Make sure you get another vets advice

When will the blood work be back?

> wrote in message
ups.com...
> On Apr 4, 7:34 am, "Moongal" > wrote:
>>> You should definately get some blood work done. My cat has those same
>> symptoms, he has kidney failure and he's anemic, but without the blood
>> work
>> it's hard to tell for sure because those symptoms can apply to other
>> things
>> too and you need to know so you can treat your cat properly.
>>
>> Good luck, I hope it's something that can be cured.
>
> Well, it's not good news. According to the vet, she's a very sick
> cat. She has some sort of auto-immune problem and she's severly
> anemic. Basically now we have no choice but to give her steroids
> twice a day that will either make her better, or, if she has a kidney
> or liver problem, make her worse, and kill her.
>
>

April 4th 07, 10:49 PM
Matthew wrote:
> Make sure you get another vets advice
>
> When will the blood work be back?
>
> > wrote in message
> ups.com...
> > On Apr 4, 7:34 am, "Moongal" > wrote:
> >>> You should definately get some blood work done. My cat has those same
> >> symptoms, he has kidney failure and he's anemic, but without the blood
> >> work
> >> it's hard to tell for sure because those symptoms can apply to other
> >> things
> >> too and you need to know so you can treat your cat properly.
> >>
> >> Good luck, I hope it's something that can be cured.
> >
> > Well, it's not good news. According to the vet, she's a very sick
> > cat. She has some sort of auto-immune problem and she's severly
> > anemic. Basically now we have no choice but to give her steroids
> > twice a day that will either make her better, or, if she has a kidney
> > or liver problem, make her worse, and kill her.

Well, they can't even test the blood. They tried a couple of times
(she loved being dragged back out to have blood drawn again, as you
can imagine) and they can't do anything with it because she's so
anemic, so they can't determine if she has any kidney or liver
problems. So she says the only thing we can do is to give her the
pills and see if she gets better or worse, and if she gets worse,
there's nothing that can be done for her. They first suspected
diabetes and ruled that out through a urine test.

Moongal
April 4th 07, 11:04 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Well, they can't even test the blood. They tried a couple of times
> (she loved being dragged back out to have blood drawn again, as you
> can imagine) and they can't do anything with it because she's so
> anemic, so they can't determine if she has any kidney or liver
> problems. So she says the only thing we can do is to give her the
> pills and see if she gets better or worse, and if she gets worse,
> there's nothing that can be done for her. They first suspected
> diabetes and ruled that out through a urine test.
>

How would the vet know your cat is anemic without a blood test? The
symptoms sure sound like it, but I didn't think you could know for sure
without testing the blood (I'm certainly not a medical expert though!)

Anyway, I don't know about liver problems, but if it's kidney problems your
cat can be treated. It's more like palative care, but she could have much
more time. My cat has surprised everyone at the vets with how well he has
been doing these last few months even though he has kidney failure and
anemia. In fact he's in my lap right now tapping me to keep petting him.
I don't like that your vet says there is nothing that can be done. If you
can, try for a second opinion.

My thoughts are with you. I really hope the pills she is taking now really
help her.

Gail
April 4th 07, 11:13 PM
I agree with getting a second opinion. There seems like too much guess work
with your vet.
Gail
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
> Make sure you get another vets advice
>
> When will the blood work be back?
>
> > wrote in message
> ups.com...
>> On Apr 4, 7:34 am, "Moongal" > wrote:
>>>> You should definately get some blood work done. My cat has those same
>>> symptoms, he has kidney failure and he's anemic, but without the blood
>>> work
>>> it's hard to tell for sure because those symptoms can apply to other
>>> things
>>> too and you need to know so you can treat your cat properly.
>>>
>>> Good luck, I hope it's something that can be cured.
>>
>> Well, it's not good news. According to the vet, she's a very sick
>> cat. She has some sort of auto-immune problem and she's severly
>> anemic. Basically now we have no choice but to give her steroids
>> twice a day that will either make her better, or, if she has a kidney
>> or liver problem, make her worse, and kill her.
>>
>>
>
>

cindys
April 5th 07, 01:47 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Our 11 year old cat who is usually pretty spry just lies around
> everyday and doesn't eat as much and is losing weight. She has
> increased thirst too. All of this sounds like diabetes, but she has
> also lost her voice. She doesn't purr anymore and when she does meow
> (which isn't very often anymore), she sounds really hoarse and it
> usually either sounds like a little squeak or kind of a hiss. She
> doesn't seem to have any pain anywhere in her body. We've got her an
> appointment with the vet, but we tried to put it off for a while
> hoping it was just a cold or something, because it's so traumatic for
> her to go to the vet, and we hate putting her through that. Does
> anyone have any idea what might be wrong with her? I'd just like to
> hear some guesses before her appointment tommorow. Thanks!
----------
Just wanted to comment about the lost voice. When my cat Molly was still
alive, she completely lost her voice at one point. The vet said it could be
a tumor but it could also be benign growth on her vocal cords. At any rate,
the vet treated it empirically with an injection of corticosteroids saying
that if that if her voice didn't return in a few days, I should bring Molly
back, and they would look down her throat (under anesthesia). The
corticosteroid injection worked, and Molly got her voice back partially. She
had a hoarse voice for the remainder of her life. She lived approximately
one more year until she succumbed to chronic renal failure at the age of 17
(we had her euthanized), but this was not related to the voice problem as
far as I know. She stopped purring several weeks before she died/we had her
euthanized. It does take energy for cats to purr, so when a cat stops
purring, it could be because the cat is weak/lacks the energy.

After you see your vet, please post again, and tell us what he/she said.
Purrs to you and your kitty.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

cindys
April 5th 07, 01:48 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Matthew wrote:
>> Make sure you get another vets advice
>>
>> When will the blood work be back?
>>
>> > wrote in message
>> ups.com...
>> > On Apr 4, 7:34 am, "Moongal" > wrote:
>> >>> You should definately get some blood work done. My cat has those
>> >>> same
>> >> symptoms, he has kidney failure and he's anemic, but without the blood
>> >> work
>> >> it's hard to tell for sure because those symptoms can apply to other
>> >> things
>> >> too and you need to know so you can treat your cat properly.
>> >>
>> >> Good luck, I hope it's something that can be cured.
>> >
>> > Well, it's not good news. According to the vet, she's a very sick
>> > cat. She has some sort of auto-immune problem and she's severly
>> > anemic. Basically now we have no choice but to give her steroids
>> > twice a day that will either make her better, or, if she has a kidney
>> > or liver problem, make her worse, and kill her.
>
> Well, they can't even test the blood. They tried a couple of times
> (she loved being dragged back out to have blood drawn again, as you
> can imagine) and they can't do anything with it because she's so
> anemic, so they can't determine if she has any kidney or liver
> problems. So she says the only thing we can do is to give her the
> pills and see if she gets better or worse, and if she gets worse,
> there's nothing that can be done for her. They first suspected
> diabetes and ruled that out through a urine test.
--------
I should have read your follow-up before I responded. (I am back on the
computer for the first time in two days). My vet gave Molly a steroid
injection. Why is your vet doing pills rather than an injection?
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

buglady
April 5th 07, 01:57 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...

> Well, they can't even test the blood. They tried a couple of times
> (she loved being dragged back out to have blood drawn again, as you
> can imagine) and they can't do anything with it because she's so
> anemic,
........What do you mean? The couldn't find a vein? Is she dehydrated? Did
they put her on IV to rehydrate her?

So she says the only thing we can do is to give her the
> pills and see if she gets better or worse, and if she gets worse,
> there's nothing that can be done for her.

........Second opinion.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

Spot
April 5th 07, 02:31 AM
If there are kidney issues they should be able to tell from a urine test is
she's leaking protien which is a sign of kidney problems.

Celeste

> wrote in message
ups.com...
>
> Matthew wrote:
>> Make sure you get another vets advice
>>
>> When will the blood work be back?
>>
>> > wrote in message
>> ups.com...
>> > On Apr 4, 7:34 am, "Moongal" > wrote:
>> >>> You should definately get some blood work done. My cat has those
>> >>> same
>> >> symptoms, he has kidney failure and he's anemic, but without the blood
>> >> work
>> >> it's hard to tell for sure because those symptoms can apply to other
>> >> things
>> >> too and you need to know so you can treat your cat properly.
>> >>
>> >> Good luck, I hope it's something that can be cured.
>> >
>> > Well, it's not good news. According to the vet, she's a very sick
>> > cat. She has some sort of auto-immune problem and she's severly
>> > anemic. Basically now we have no choice but to give her steroids
>> > twice a day that will either make her better, or, if she has a kidney
>> > or liver problem, make her worse, and kill her.
>
> Well, they can't even test the blood. They tried a couple of times
> (she loved being dragged back out to have blood drawn again, as you
> can imagine) and they can't do anything with it because she's so
> anemic, so they can't determine if she has any kidney or liver
> problems. So she says the only thing we can do is to give her the
> pills and see if she gets better or worse, and if she gets worse,
> there's nothing that can be done for her. They first suspected
> diabetes and ruled that out through a urine test.
>

April 5th 07, 03:00 AM
On Apr 4, 8:57 pm, "buglady" > wrote:
> > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
> > Well, they can't even test the blood. They tried a couple of times
> > (she loved being dragged back out to have blood drawn again, as you
> > can imagine) and they can't do anything with it because she's so
> > anemic,
>
> .......What do you mean? The couldn't find a vein? Is she dehydrated? Did
> they put her on IV to rehydrate her?
>
> So she says the only thing we can do is to give her the
>
> > pills and see if she gets better or worse, and if she gets worse,
> > there's nothing that can be done for her.
>
> .......Second opinion.
>
> buglady
> take out the dog before replying

Since she's so anemic, her blood is sticking together and in order to
test to find out if she has liver or kidney problems they need to
seperate parts of the blood, which they're unable to do.

Gail
April 5th 07, 03:11 AM
I don't buy this.......
Gail
> wrote in message
ups.com...
> On Apr 4, 8:57 pm, "buglady" > wrote:
>> > wrote in message
>>
>> ups.com...
>>
>> > Well, they can't even test the blood. They tried a couple of times
>> > (she loved being dragged back out to have blood drawn again, as you
>> > can imagine) and they can't do anything with it because she's so
>> > anemic,
>>
>> .......What do you mean? The couldn't find a vein? Is she dehydrated?
>> Did
>> they put her on IV to rehydrate her?
>>
>> So she says the only thing we can do is to give her the
>>
>> > pills and see if she gets better or worse, and if she gets worse,
>> > there's nothing that can be done for her.
>>
>> .......Second opinion.
>>
>> buglady
>> take out the dog before replying
>
> Since she's so anemic, her blood is sticking together and in order to
> test to find out if she has liver or kidney problems they need to
> seperate parts of the blood, which they're unable to do.
>

buglady
April 5th 07, 03:58 AM
"Gail" > wrote in message
link.net...
> I don't buy this.......
> > Since she's so anemic, her blood is sticking together and in order to
> > test to find out if she has liver or kidney problems they need to
> > seperate parts of the blood, which they're unable to do.

........I don't either. Blood gets thick when you're dehydrated. If the
veins are flat there's not enough fluid in them.

buglady
take out the dog before replying

tension_on_the_wire
April 5th 07, 04:50 AM
On Apr 4, 5:47 pm, "cindys" > wrote:
She stopped purring several weeks before she died/we had her
> euthanized. It does take energy for cats to purr, so when a cat stops
> purring, it could be because the cat is weak/lacks the energy.

Everyone who has mentioned the loss of voice has also mentioned their
cat was found to be anemic. I wonder, since we still aren't one
hundred percent clear on the mechanism of purring, whether the anemia
makes it difficult to generate turbulence in the blood flow around the
vocal cords. Turbulence in the blood flow was proposed as one
possible mechanism for purring. Perhaps you need to have a minimum
hemoglobin level for good purring. Don't think that would apply to
meow-ing though.

--tension

Meghan Noecker
April 5th 07, 05:11 AM
On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 22:04:39 GMT, "Moongal" >
wrote:


>How would the vet know your cat is anemic without a blood test? The
>symptoms sure sound like it, but I didn't think you could know for sure
>without testing the blood (I'm certainly not a medical expert though!)
>

When Kira's anemia was at its worst, her blood was very thick. The vet
brough the sampe back to the room and showed it to me. He said it was
obviously worse, and we increased her meds. The bloodwork confirmed
his beliefs.

The prednisolone did help her anemia, and for about a month, she had
great bloodwork results and was back to normal. Unfortunately, she
dropped back, and it was too late that time to save her.

My vet also prescribed a liquid supplement for anemia, another
medicine that goes after parasites that don't always show up in tests,
and a supplement to help her nutrition since she wasn't eating as
well.

Meghan Noecker
April 5th 07, 05:15 AM
On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 02:58:24 GMT, "buglady" >
wrote:

>
>"Gail" > wrote in message
link.net...
>> I don't buy this.......
>> > Since she's so anemic, her blood is sticking together and in order to
>> > test to find out if she has liver or kidney problems they need to
>> > seperate parts of the blood, which they're unable to do.
>
>.......I don't either. Blood gets thick when you're dehydrated. If the
>veins are flat there's not enough fluid in them.
>

It does get thicker, but it is still testable, mostly. One of the
tests could not be done the time Kira's blood was really thick, but
they were able to get results for the rest of it.

It was visibly thick, and still above the level for no-0regenerating
anemia, so I would suspect that worse levels could be even thicker.

Kira was panting because she was having trouble getting enough air
with the reduced blood flow.

cindys
April 5th 07, 05:43 AM
"tension_on_the_wire" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> On Apr 4, 5:47 pm, "cindys" > wrote:
> She stopped purring several weeks before she died/we had her
>> euthanized. It does take energy for cats to purr, so when a cat stops
>> purring, it could be because the cat is weak/lacks the energy.
>
> Everyone who has mentioned the loss of voice has also mentioned their
> cat was found to be anemic.

When Molly lost her voice (meow), the vet did not do any bloodwork. She
simply gave Molly the corticosteroid injection empirically and told me to
phone her if I didn't see any improvement. If there were no improvement, her
plan was to look into Molly's throat under anesthesia. At the time, Molly
was still purring fine. Molly did get her voice back as result of the
injection, and she didn't have any blood work done (at that time), so there
is no way to know if she was anemic or not. The vet told me that during the
course of her career (around 25 years), she had only come across cats with
laryngitis three times before. In one situation, it had been a tumor. In
another situation, it was polyps on the vocal cords. In the third situation,
the cat died of another ailment before the cause of the laryngitis was
diagnosed. Molly never lost her purr until nearly a year later (shortly
before she died).

> I wonder, since we still aren't one
> hundred percent clear on the mechanism of purring, whether the anemia
> makes it difficult to generate turbulence in the blood flow around the
> vocal cords. Turbulence in the blood flow was proposed as one
> possible mechanism for purring. Perhaps you need to have a minimum
> hemoglobin level for good purring. Don't think that would apply to
> meow-ing though.

But now you're saying that the anemia might be connected to inability to
purr, not inability to meow, whereas above you stated that everyone who
mentioned loss of voice (i.e. inability to meow) also mentioned that his/her
cat was anemic. So, I'm not sure what you're trying to say, but in the case
of my cat, inability to meow did not seem to be related to anemia (because
she got her voice back after the corticosteroid injection, which would not
have improved anemia, if she had it).. Inability to purr may have been
related to anemia, but it's hard to say in Molly's case because by the time
she stopped purring, she was already at the endstage of CRF and quite weak,
and we had her euthanized several weeks later. I do find it an interesting
theory, however, that inability to purr may be related to anemia. I wonder
if there has ever been any research done in this area.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Meghan Noecker
April 5th 07, 07:35 AM
On 4 Apr 2007 20:50:32 -0700, "tension_on_the_wire"
> wrote:

>On Apr 4, 5:47 pm, "cindys" > wrote:
> She stopped purring several weeks before she died/we had her
>> euthanized. It does take energy for cats to purr, so when a cat stops
>> purring, it could be because the cat is weak/lacks the energy.
>
>Everyone who has mentioned the loss of voice has also mentioned their
>cat was found to be anemic.

I mentioned anemia as those symptoms matched Kira. But she was never
unable to purr. Even during her worst times, she snuggled with me and
purred.

Her voice loss was only for a couple weeks, not total, and not during
the worst of her anemia. Just at the beginning when I didn't yet know
what was going on.