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MaryL
April 7th 07, 04:05 PM
I was reading a message in another group from a member who has received the
distressing diagnosis that her cat has heartworms. I would like to take
this opportunity to remind everyone that heartworms can be prevented, but
there is no reliable treatment if our cats are infected. Heartworms are
much more common in dogs than in cats, but it is *much worse* if cats are
infected. Please read this document from the American Heartworm Society:
http://www.heartwormsociety.org/felineheartworminfo.htm#canine

I use Heartgard, and I use it all year around because I live in East Texas
(where the protocol calls for monthly use). If you live in a northern
state, your vet can tell you which months are the ones where you need
preventative treatment. Heartgard is a very large, flexible (pliable)
tablet. I pull/twist it into little pieces. My cats detect it in their
food and will not eat it, but they will eat it when I mix it with tuna.
Many people use Revolution, but I will *never* use that product again
following an adverse effect on my cats (as I described in a message that I
posted on April 5).

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

22brix
April 7th 07, 05:14 PM
MaryL,

Thanks for posting this reminder--it's a great service. As you may (or may
not!) remember, I've had two cats with heartworm and it can be hideous--one
of them had to be euthanized because fluids would build up around his lungs
and he would have difficulty breathing. Many cats die suddenly without any
symptoms. Prevention is so easy and well worth the money spent. I don't
remember now but I probably spent over $1000 on the kitty who was eventually
euthanized and several hundred on the other cat. I also live in a mild
enough climate that we use prevention (Heartgard) every month.

Thanks again for posting this.

Bonnie


"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
...
>I was reading a message in another group from a member who has received the
>distressing diagnosis that her cat has heartworms. I would like to take
>this opportunity to remind everyone that heartworms can be prevented, but
>there is no reliable treatment if our cats are infected. Heartworms are
>much more common in dogs than in cats, but it is *much worse* if cats are
>infected. Please read this document from the American Heartworm Society:
>http://www.heartwormsociety.org/felineheartworminfo.htm#canine
>
> I use Heartgard, and I use it all year around because I live in East Texas
> (where the protocol calls for monthly use). If you live in a northern
> state, your vet can tell you which months are the ones where you need
> preventative treatment. Heartgard is a very large, flexible (pliable)
> tablet. I pull/twist it into little pieces. My cats detect it in their
> food and will not eat it, but they will eat it when I mix it with tuna.
> Many people use Revolution, but I will *never* use that product again
> following an adverse effect on my cats (as I described in a message that I
> posted on April 5).
>
> MaryL
>
> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
> Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
> Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
>

MaryL
April 7th 07, 05:39 PM
Thanks, Bonnie. I had forgotten that you had two cats with heartworm. You
have given us all a haunting and tragic depiction. I wish we had more
publicity to remind us to take preventive action.

MaryL


"22brix" > wrote in message
...
> MaryL,
>
> Thanks for posting this reminder--it's a great service. As you may (or
> may not!) remember, I've had two cats with heartworm and it can be
> hideous--one of them had to be euthanized because fluids would build up
> around his lungs and he would have difficulty breathing. Many cats die
> suddenly without any symptoms. Prevention is so easy and well worth the
> money spent. I don't remember now but I probably spent over $1000 on the
> kitty who was eventually euthanized and several hundred on the other cat.
> I also live in a mild enough climate that we use prevention (Heartgard)
> every month.
>
> Thanks again for posting this.
>
> Bonnie
>
>
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
> ...
>>I was reading a message in another group from a member who has received
>>the distressing diagnosis that her cat has heartworms. I would like to
>>take this opportunity to remind everyone that heartworms can be prevented,
>>but there is no reliable treatment if our cats are infected. Heartworms
>>are much more common in dogs than in cats, but it is *much worse* if cats
>>are infected. Please read this document from the American Heartworm
>>Society: http://www.heartwormsociety.org/felineheartworminfo.htm#canine
>>
>> I use Heartgard, and I use it all year around because I live in East
>> Texas (where the protocol calls for monthly use). If you live in a
>> northern state, your vet can tell you which months are the ones where you
>> need preventative treatment. Heartgard is a very large, flexible
>> (pliable) tablet. I pull/twist it into little pieces. My cats detect it
>> in their food and will not eat it, but they will eat it when I mix it
>> with tuna. Many people use Revolution, but I will *never* use that
>> product again following an adverse effect on my cats (as I described in a
>> message that I posted on April 5).
>>
>> MaryL
>>
>> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
>> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
>> Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
>> Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e
>>
>
>

22brix
April 7th 07, 06:45 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
...
> Thanks, Bonnie. I had forgotten that you had two cats with heartworm.
> You have given us all a haunting and tragic depiction. I wish we had
> more publicity to remind us to take preventive action.
>
> MaryL
>

You're doing a great service in posting these reminders. I really didn't
know much about heartworm in cats until my cats got sick with it. I knew it
was a problem in dogs and in fact have given heartworm preventatives to our
dogs, never realizing cats could get it. And you're right, there's no
treatment for it in cats. I've heard of surgery where the heartworms are
removed from the heart of the cat but it's extremely risky and I don't know
how many vet hospitals do it. Maybe more in the East and South but not too
many in California. From my understanding, they can only do that type of
surgery if the heartworms are visualized in the correct chamber of the heart
and for the life of me I don't remember which.

It's not very common but people can get heartworm, too and can be very
serious.

Thanks again for reminding all of us--it is such a preventable disease and I
would hate to see any cat go through what my cats went through.

Bonnie

sheelagh
April 7th 07, 06:56 PM
On 7 Apr, 17:39, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> Thanks, Bonnie. I had forgotten that you had two cats with heartworm. You
> have given us all a haunting and tragic depiction. I wish we had more
> publicity to remind us to take preventive action.
>
> MaryL
>
> "22brix" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > MaryL,
>
> > Thanks for posting this reminder--it's a great service. As you may (or
> > may not!) remember, I've had two cats with heartworm and it can be
> > hideous--one of them had to be euthanized because fluids would build up
> > around his lungs and he would have difficulty breathing. Many cats die
> > suddenly without any symptoms. Prevention is so easy and well worth the
> > money spent. I don't remember now but I probably spent over $1000 on the
> > kitty who was eventually euthanized and several hundred on the other cat.
> > I also live in a mild enough climate that we use prevention (Heartgard)
> > every month.
>
> > Thanks again for posting this.
>
> > Bonnie
>
> > "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
> ...
> >>I was reading a message in another group from a member who has received
> >>the distressing diagnosis that her cat has heartworms. I would like to
> >>take this opportunity to remind everyone that heartworms can be prevented,
> >>but there is no reliable treatment if our cats are infected. Heartworms
> >>are much more common in dogs than in cats, but it is *much worse* if cats
> >>are infected. Please read this document from the American Heartworm
> >>Society:http://www.heartwormsociety.org/felineheartworminfo.htm#canine
>
> >> I use Heartgard, and I use it all year around because I live in East
> >> Texas (where the protocol calls for monthly use). If you live in a
> >> northern state, your vet can tell you which months are the ones where you
> >> need preventative treatment. Heartgard is a very large, flexible
> >> (pliable) tablet. I pull/twist it into little pieces. My cats detect it
> >> in their food and will not eat it, but they will eat it when I mix it
> >> with tuna. Many people use Revolution, but I will *never* use that
> >> product again following an adverse effect on my cats (as I described in a
> >> message that I posted on April 5).
>
> >> MaryL
>
> >> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
> >> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
> >> Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
> >> Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thank you for the reminder.

Heartworm is something that I have never come across before, so the
information link that you provided was very useful indeed.

In recent years, we have experienced more and more plagues of
mosquitoes each year as the summers get hotter and the air becomes
ever more humid too.
I wonder if this is something that all of us in the UK should be
thinking about as well?
The reason I ask, is because if we have mosquitoes, then surely we run
the risk of heartworm too?

I also wonder if it is something that we should treaty for routinely
when we are giving treatment for worms and ticks as a precaution , or
have no reason to worry about it?

Advice would be most welcome. Thanks,
S;o)

MaryL
April 7th 07, 07:11 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On 7 Apr, 17:39, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> wrote:
>> Thanks, Bonnie. I had forgotten that you had two cats with heartworm.
>> You
>> have given us all a haunting and tragic depiction. I wish we had more
>> publicity to remind us to take preventive action.
>>
>> MaryL
>>
>> "22brix" > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>> > MaryL,
>>
>> > Thanks for posting this reminder--it's a great service. As you may (or
>> > may not!) remember, I've had two cats with heartworm and it can be
>> > hideous--one of them had to be euthanized because fluids would build up
>> > around his lungs and he would have difficulty breathing. Many cats die
>> > suddenly without any symptoms. Prevention is so easy and well worth
>> > the
>> > money spent. I don't remember now but I probably spent over $1000 on
>> > the
>> > kitty who was eventually euthanized and several hundred on the other
>> > cat.
>> > I also live in a mild enough climate that we use prevention (Heartgard)
>> > every month.
>>
>> > Thanks again for posting this.
>>
>> > Bonnie
>>
>> > "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
>> ...
>> >>I was reading a message in another group from a member who has received
>> >>the distressing diagnosis that her cat has heartworms. I would like to
>> >>take this opportunity to remind everyone that heartworms can be
>> >>prevented,
>> >>but there is no reliable treatment if our cats are infected.
>> >>Heartworms
>> >>are much more common in dogs than in cats, but it is *much worse* if
>> >>cats
>> >>are infected. Please read this document from the American Heartworm
>> >>Society:http://www.heartwormsociety.org/felineheartworminfo.htm#canine
>>
>> >> I use Heartgard, and I use it all year around because I live in East
>> >> Texas (where the protocol calls for monthly use). If you live in a
>> >> northern state, your vet can tell you which months are the ones where
>> >> you
>> >> need preventative treatment. Heartgard is a very large, flexible
>> >> (pliable) tablet. I pull/twist it into little pieces. My cats detect
>> >> it
>> >> in their food and will not eat it, but they will eat it when I mix it
>> >> with tuna. Many people use Revolution, but I will *never* use that
>> >> product again following an adverse effect on my cats (as I described
>> >> in a
>> >> message that I posted on April 5).
>>
>> >> MaryL
>>
>> >> Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
>> >> Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
>> >> Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
>> >> Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e- Hide quoted
>> >> text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> Thank you for the reminder.
>
> Heartworm is something that I have never come across before, so the
> information link that you provided was very useful indeed.
>
> In recent years, we have experienced more and more plagues of
> mosquitoes each year as the summers get hotter and the air becomes
> ever more humid too.
> I wonder if this is something that all of us in the UK should be
> thinking about as well?
> The reason I ask, is because if we have mosquitoes, then surely we run
> the risk of heartworm too?
>
> I also wonder if it is something that we should treaty for routinely
> when we are giving treatment for worms and ticks as a precaution , or
> have no reason to worry about it?
>
> Advice would be most welcome. Thanks,
> S;o)
>

Unfortunately, I can't answer your question. This is a question that would
be well worth asking your vet and then post for other UK readers. Or, do
some of our UK friends (and other regions of the world) already have some
information that you could share?

MaryL

22brix
April 7th 07, 07:19 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message >
> Heartworm is something that I have never come across before, so the
> information link that you provided was very useful indeed.
>
> In recent years, we have experienced more and more plagues of
> mosquitoes each year as the summers get hotter and the air becomes
> ever more humid too.
> I wonder if this is something that all of us in the UK should be
> thinking about as well?
> The reason I ask, is because if we have mosquitoes, then surely we run
> the risk of heartworm too?
>
> I also wonder if it is something that we should treaty for routinely
> when we are giving treatment for worms and ticks as a precaution , or
> have no reason to worry about it?
>
> Advice would be most welcome. Thanks,
> S;o)


Hi Sheelagh,

I don't think it's considered to be a problem in the UK YET but there are
several articles on line regarding heartworm in the UK. Most of them talk
about heartworm in dogs but just remember that where dogs can get it, cats
can, too. It sounds like the problem is mostly in pets that have been
abroad.

Bonnie

http://www.isabellevets.co.uk/health_advice/dog/info/roundwormsdog.htm

http://www.yorkcats.org.uk/felineasthma.htm

Lynne
April 8th 07, 12:24 AM
on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 16:14:53 GMT, "22brix" >
wrote:

> Thanks for posting this reminder--it's a great service.

Agree!

> As you may
> (or may not!) remember, I've had two cats with heartworm and it can be
> hideous--one of them had to be euthanized because fluids would build
> up around his lungs and he would have difficulty breathing. Many cats
> die suddenly without any symptoms. Prevention is so easy and well
> worth the money spent. I don't remember now but I probably spent over
> $1000 on the kitty who was eventually euthanized and several hundred
> on the other cat. I also live in a mild enough climate that we use
> prevention (Heartgard) every month.

Bonnie, how awful for you and your cats! I had no idea. I'm so sorry
you all went through that.

I treat my cats with Interceptor year round. I considered switching them
to an all-in-one flea/heartworm product, but I am going to stick with
what I know works (Interceptor and Frontline Plus, for all my animals)
and what doesn't cause any reactions or other problems for them.

> Thanks again for posting this.

Agree again. I don't think many people use heartworm preventatives on
their cats, but they really should. My vet was even surprised when I
asked for Interceptor for the cats when we first started going to him. I
like that it prevents intestinal worms, too.

--
Lynne

22brix
April 8th 07, 01:47 AM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> on Sat, 07 Apr 2007 16:14:53 GMT, "22brix" >
> wrote:
>
>> Thanks for posting this reminder--it's a great service.
>
> Agree!
>
>
> Bonnie, how awful for you and your cats! I had no idea. I'm so sorry
> you all went through that.

One of the cats did great--the only (and very scary!) symptom was an episode
of syncope where he lost control of his bladder, his gums were pasty white
and he was staggering around, almost unable to walk. He was yowling the most
heartbreaking meow--he seemed to be in pain and I think was also totally
freaked out. My vet said he almost died, most likely an adult worm blocking
a blood vessel--ten minutes later he was asking for his breakfast. He never
had any other symptoms other than an occasional cough. He finally tested
negative 3-4 years later--both my vet and myself were doing happy dances
around the room!!

With the other cat, we initially noticed he was breathing with a little more
effort than usual--like he was having to force the last bit of breath out.
He had chylothorax--the vets would remove 80 to 90 cc of this thick milky
fluid from around his lungs, he would feel better for a while (three or four
weeks at first) and then they would have to take out more fluid. He started
needing fluids removed more and more often, finally only after a day or two.
The pleural tissues started to adhere to each other, making it impossible
for them to draw off any more fluid. We finally had him put to sleep when
it became obvious that he was no longer responding to treatment and began
coughing up blood. It was a horrible thing to watch, so helpless because
you really couldn't do anything. He was a young, sweet boy and deserved to
live many more years. I felt (and feel) so guilty for not using
preventatives before that and I certainly learned that lesson painfully. I
hope by reading this somebody out there will decide to start treating their
cats--an awful disease and totally preventable.


>
> I treat my cats with Interceptor year round. I considered switching them
> to an all-in-one flea/heartworm product, but I am going to stick with
> what I know works (Interceptor and Frontline Plus, for all my animals)
> and what doesn't cause any reactions or other problems for them.
>

That's great. Most of my cats love the Heartgard chewables it's a big treat
for them. We are lucky to be in an almost flea free environment (dog gets
flea prevention, cats are indoors and treating just the dog and one of two
of the cats seems to have kept it that way). I grind up an Interceptor
tablet and add it to a little canned food for one of my more finicky cats.
She had a weird reaction to Revolution several years ago and I've been
afraid to use it since.

Bonnie

sheelagh
April 8th 07, 02:02 AM
On 7 Apr, 19:19, "22brix" > wrote:
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message >
> > Heartworm is something that I have never come across before, so the
> > information link that you provided was very useful indeed.
>
> > In recent years, we have experienced more and more plagues of
> > mosquitoes each year as the summers get hotter and the air becomes
> > ever more humid too.
> > I wonder if this is something that all of us in the UK should be
> > thinking about as well?
> > The reason I ask, is because if we have mosquitoes, then surely we run
> > the risk of heartworm too?
>
> > I also wonder if it is something that we should treaty for routinely
> > when we are giving treatment for worms and ticks as a precaution , or
> > have no reason to worry about it?
>
> > Advice would be most welcome. Thanks,
> > S;o)
>
> Hi Sheelagh,
>
> I don't think it's considered to be a problem in the UK YET but there are
> several articles on line regarding heartworm in the UK. Most of them talk
> about heartworm in dogs but just remember that where dogs can get it, cats
> can, too. It sounds like the problem is mostly in pets that have been
> abroad.
>
> Bonnie
>
> http://www.isabellevets.co.uk/health_advice/dog/info/roundwormsdog.htm
>
> http://www.yorkcats.org.uk/felineasthma.htm- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Oh dear Bonnie, You certainly seem to be going through a bad patch
recently with all of the problems that you have had recently with
tortle,.& now this on top of it. I had no idea that some of your
feline family had cases like this. I most certainly feel for you- You
have enough to worry about without your latest distress to cope with.
You have our support & are in our thoughts too.

Thank you so much for the links too. I found them very informative, as
I did Mary's posting as well.

I did a tiny bit of research on the subject, & it seems that there was
a good reason to start thinking about protecting our cats, rather than
waiting for the problem to come to us, then having no chance to treat
it, through simple precautionary medication.
I will post a link to what I managed to dredge up from Googling &
Ask.com too.
It seems that there is a problem over here, even though it is not as
wide spread as the USA Heartworm infestations that you seem to have to
cope with.

It would seem that we have a similar type of worm that has been spread
via foxes, but brought into our country via dogs and cats visiting
Europe on our new pet passports that were introduced recently (in
their great wisdom!!)

I am going to post a link here in case there are other Uk'ers that are
not familiar with the problem, as I am sure that they are not informed
of it, any more than I was...

In fact I am quite shocked that we are not informed about this by our
vets either.
I do have a question though. Is there a difference between lung worm &
heart worm?
The reason I question this, is because it didn't make it clear. I
read a couple of articles about it & the general consensus is that
Revolution was the best all round product to cover most of them. But
having read Lynn's post I see that I might be misinformed here?

If any one could suggest a better product, I would be most grateful if
you would post about it. I am new to this problem so I have no idea
what is best for them & would appreciate your opinions on the products
& why you would choose that particular product. I have a sneaking
suspicion that the reason Revolution & Stronghold were mentioned was
because the sites were built by their manufacturers.
Thanks again to all of you,
S;o)

http://www.parkvets.com/clientinformation-angiostrongylus.html

Lynne
April 8th 07, 02:10 AM
on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 00:47:55 GMT, "22brix" >
wrote:

> One of the cats did great--the only (and very scary!) symptom was an
> episode of syncope where he lost control of his bladder, his gums were
> pasty white and he was staggering around, almost unable to walk. He
> was yowling the most heartbreaking meow--he seemed to be in pain and I
> think was also totally freaked out. My vet said he almost died, most
> likely an adult worm blocking a blood vessel--ten minutes later he was
> asking for his breakfast. He never had any other symptoms other than
> an occasional cough. He finally tested negative 3-4 years later--both
> my vet and myself were doing happy dances around the room!!

That's fantastic! I suspect he was one of the rare, lucky ones.

> With the other cat, we initially noticed he was breathing with a
> little more effort than usual--like he was having to force the last
> bit of breath out. He had chylothorax--the vets would remove 80 to 90
> cc of this thick milky fluid from around his lungs, he would feel
> better for a while (three or four weeks at first) and then they would
> have to take out more fluid. He started needing fluids removed more
> and more often, finally only after a day or two. The pleural tissues
> started to adhere to each other, making it impossible for them to draw
> off any more fluid. We finally had him put to sleep when it became
> obvious that he was no longer responding to treatment and began
> coughing up blood. It was a horrible thing to watch, so helpless
> because you really couldn't do anything.

Oh, Bonnie, I honestly cannot imagine how awful that must have been. I
don't want to imagine it!

> He was a young, sweet boy and
> deserved to live many more years. I felt (and feel) so guilty for not
> using preventatives before that and I certainly learned that lesson
> painfully. I hope by reading this somebody out there will decide to
> start treating their cats--an awful disease and totally preventable.

You shouldn't feel guilty. How may vets encourage their clients to put
their cats on heartworm preventatives? I know that none of mine have. I
made the decision completely on my own, and as I said, it shocked one of
my vets that I have them on it. I'm glad this is being discussed on this
ng now, at the beginning of mosquito season.

> That's great. Most of my cats love the Heartgard chewables it's a big
> treat for them. We are lucky to be in an almost flea free environment
> (dog gets flea prevention, cats are indoors and treating just the dog
> and one of two of the cats seems to have kept it that way). I grind
> up an Interceptor tablet and add it to a little canned food for one of
> my more finicky cats. She had a weird reaction to Revolution several
> years ago and I've been afraid to use it since.

I guess I am a mean mom. I just shove the Interceptor tablets down my
cats' throats. It's easier with Rudy, my 3 year old, because he's used
to it. I show him the tablet so he knows what is coming, and he'll just
lay wherever he's laying and let me do it. He knows he will get a treat
right after and it's not a big deal to him. Now if I try to give him
liquid meds, that's another story altogether! He lets me do it, but he
always foams at the mouth and coughs and it's just awful. We try to
avoid liquids. Levi, the little one, isn't fond of being pilled, but I'm
quick and he doesn't mind the treat after. I'm sure he'll get used to it
just like Rudy did.

I probably don't need to give them the flea treatment every month since
they are indoor only, but I don't want to risk fleas. Rudy got tapeworm
one summer when I slacked off on flea treatment because we didn't seem to
have any. Clearly we had at least one and he ate it. Worms gross me out
so badly that now I just treat everyone--dog and cats--on the same day
once a month. I give the Interceptor year round (to keep intestinal
worms at bay), and I give the Frontline ~9 months out of the year. That
is probably overkill, but since it's not absorbed into their blood stream
like some of the topicals, I am okay with that.

I considered trying the topical that also kills mosquitos, too, but after
reading about some of the adverse reactions here, I am not keen on
changing anything.

--
Lynne

Lynne
April 8th 07, 02:26 AM
on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 01:02:30 GMT, "sheelagh"
> wrote:

> I do have a question though. Is there a difference between lung worm &
> heart worm?

That's a good question! I don't know, though, but I'm sure a Google
search would clear that up.

> The reason I question this, is because it didn't make it clear. I
> read a couple of articles about it & the general consensus is that
> Revolution was the best all round product to cover most of them. But
> having read Lynn's post I see that I might be misinformed here?

I use Interceptor for heartworm and intestinal worms, and Frontline Plus
for fleas and ticks, on both my cats and my dogs. I use the 'Plus'
variety because it also kills ticks, which we sometimes accidentally
bring home on our clothing from the woods.

I started using Interceptor years and years ago because I had Shetland
Sheepdogs who can be very sensitive to Ivermectin, which is the medicine
in most if not all other heartworm preventatives. I wonder if cats
aren't sensitive to Ivermectin, too? Several people have posted about
cats having adverse reactions to Revolution, IIRC.

Interestingly, a past vet used the same combination on her dogs and cats,
even though her practice didn't carry Interceptor (so she was more than
happy to write prescriptions for me to be filled elsewhere!). She told
me it was the best way to go in her opinion. My current vet also uses
this combination. The only downside is the expense, but if you can buy
on-line, you'll save a lot of money over what most vets charge. Just be
very, very sure to buy only from reputable on-line retailers. There are
a lot of phoney products being sold on-line. I buy Interceptor and
Frontline Plus at www.xfleas.com, which has the best pricing for
authentic products that I have found, as well as free shipping to the US.
Shipping to the UK may be cost prohibitive, though.

--
Lynne

MaryL
April 8th 07, 02:27 AM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>
> If any one could suggest a better product, I would be most grateful if
> you would post about it. I am new to this problem so I have no idea
> what is best for them & would appreciate your opinions on the products
> & why you would choose that particular product. I have a sneaking
> suspicion that the reason Revolution & Stronghold were mentioned was
> because the sites were built by their manufacturers.
> Thanks again to all of you,
> S;o)
>
> http://www.parkvets.com/clientinformation-angiostrongylus.html
>

I use HeartGard. I break the large tablet (soft, pliable tablet) into small
pieces and mix them with tuna. It is administered once a month.

MaryL

22brix
April 8th 07, 06:29 AM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On 7 Apr, 19:19, "22brix" > wrote:
>> "sheelagh" > wrote in message >

> Oh dear Bonnie, You certainly seem to be going through a bad patch
> recently with all of the problems that you have had recently with
> tortle,.& now this on top of it. I had no idea that some of your
> feline family had cases like this. I most certainly feel for you- You
> have enough to worry about without your latest distress to cope with.
> You have our support & are in our thoughts too.
>

> Thank you so much for the links too. I found them very informative, as
> I did Mary's posting as well.
>
> I did a tiny bit of research on the subject, & it seems that there was
> a good reason to start thinking about protecting our cats, rather than
> waiting for the problem to come to us, then having no chance to treat
> it, through simple precautionary medication.
> I will post a link to what I managed to dredge up from Googling &
> Ask.com too.
> It seems that there is a problem over here, even though it is not as
> wide spread as the USA Heartworm infestations that you seem to have to
> cope with.
>
> It would seem that we have a similar type of worm that has been spread
> via foxes, but brought into our country via dogs and cats visiting
> Europe on our new pet passports that were introduced recently (in
> their great wisdom!!)
>
> I am going to post a link here in case there are other Uk'ers that are
> not familiar with the problem, as I am sure that they are not informed
> of it, any more than I was...
>
> In fact I am quite shocked that we are not informed about this by our
> vets either.
> I do have a question though. Is there a difference between lung worm &
> heart worm?
> The reason I question this, is because it didn't make it clear. I
> read a couple of articles about it & the general consensus is that
> Revolution was the best all round product to cover most of them. But
> having read Lynn's post I see that I might be misinformed here?
>
> If any one could suggest a better product, I would be most grateful if
> you would post about it. I am new to this problem so I have no idea
> what is best for them & would appreciate your opinions on the products
> & why you would choose that particular product. I have a sneaking
> suspicion that the reason Revolution & Stronghold were mentioned was
> because the sites were built by their manufacturers.
> Thanks again to all of you,
> S;o)
>
> http://www.parkvets.com/clientinformation-angiostrongylus.html
>

Hi Sheelagh,

My experience with heartworm kitties was several years ago so I'm NOT having
to deal with that right now, thank goodness!

I looked at the site you posted--very interesting. I do some parasitology
as part of my job but I'm not that familiar with animal parasites. Both
"traditional" heartworm and this other bug are loosely categorized as
roundworms but their modes of transmission are different--one by mosquitoes
and I guess the other by snails. It looks like Interceptor would be an
appropriate preventive--the active ingredient is milbemycin oxime which is
one of the drugs listed. I don't know if cats get this, too. I just can't
imagine most self-respecting cats being too interested in snails!

Bonnie

22brix
April 8th 07, 06:48 AM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 00:47:55 GMT, "22brix" >
> wrote:
>
>> One of the cats did great--the only (and very scary!) symptom was an
>> episode of syncope where he lost control of his bladder, his gums were
>> pasty white and he was staggering around, almost unable to walk. He
>> was yowling the most heartbreaking meow--he seemed to be in pain and I
>> think was also totally freaked out. My vet said he almost died, most
>> likely an adult worm blocking a blood vessel--ten minutes later he was
>> asking for his breakfast. He never had any other symptoms other than
>> an occasional cough. He finally tested negative 3-4 years later--both
>> my vet and myself were doing happy dances around the room!!
>
> That's fantastic! I suspect he was one of the rare, lucky ones.
>
>> With the other cat, we initially noticed he was breathing with a
>> little more effort than usual--like he was having to force the last
>> bit of breath out. He had chylothorax--the vets would remove 80 to 90
>> cc of this thick milky fluid from around his lungs, he would feel
>> better for a while (three or four weeks at first) and then they would
>> have to take out more fluid. He started needing fluids removed more
>> and more often, finally only after a day or two. The pleural tissues
>> started to adhere to each other, making it impossible for them to draw
>> off any more fluid. We finally had him put to sleep when it became
>> obvious that he was no longer responding to treatment and began
>> coughing up blood. It was a horrible thing to watch, so helpless
>> because you really couldn't do anything.
>
> Oh, Bonnie, I honestly cannot imagine how awful that must have been. I
> don't want to imagine it!
>
>> He was a young, sweet boy and
>> deserved to live many more years. I felt (and feel) so guilty for not
>> using preventatives before that and I certainly learned that lesson
>> painfully. I hope by reading this somebody out there will decide to
>> start treating their cats--an awful disease and totally preventable.
>
> You shouldn't feel guilty. How may vets encourage their clients to put
> their cats on heartworm preventatives? I know that none of mine have. I
> made the decision completely on my own, and as I said, it shocked one of
> my vets that I have them on it. I'm glad this is being discussed on this
> ng now, at the beginning of mosquito season.
>
>> That's great. Most of my cats love the Heartgard chewables it's a big
>> treat for them. We are lucky to be in an almost flea free environment
>> (dog gets flea prevention, cats are indoors and treating just the dog
>> and one of two of the cats seems to have kept it that way). I grind
>> up an Interceptor tablet and add it to a little canned food for one of
>> my more finicky cats. She had a weird reaction to Revolution several
>> years ago and I've been afraid to use it since.
>
> I guess I am a mean mom. I just shove the Interceptor tablets down my
> cats' throats. It's easier with Rudy, my 3 year old, because he's used
> to it. I show him the tablet so he knows what is coming, and he'll just
> lay wherever he's laying and let me do it. He knows he will get a treat
> right after and it's not a big deal to him. Now if I try to give him
> liquid meds, that's another story altogether! He lets me do it, but he
> always foams at the mouth and coughs and it's just awful. We try to
> avoid liquids. Levi, the little one, isn't fond of being pilled, but I'm
> quick and he doesn't mind the treat after. I'm sure he'll get used to it
> just like Rudy did.
>
> I probably don't need to give them the flea treatment every month since
> they are indoor only, but I don't want to risk fleas. Rudy got tapeworm
> one summer when I slacked off on flea treatment because we didn't seem to
> have any. Clearly we had at least one and he ate it. Worms gross me out
> so badly that now I just treat everyone--dog and cats--on the same day
> once a month. I give the Interceptor year round (to keep intestinal
> worms at bay), and I give the Frontline ~9 months out of the year. That
> is probably overkill, but since it's not absorbed into their blood stream
> like some of the topicals, I am okay with that.
>
> I considered trying the topical that also kills mosquitos, too, but after
> reading about some of the adverse reactions here, I am not keen on
> changing anything.
>
> --
> Lynne

I don't remember my own vet saying much about heartworm in cats until after
my two were diagnosed. I think it kind of shook them up--I remember more
than one vet saying the second cat couldn't have heartworm because it was so
unusual. It just wasn't that common in this part of California. It has
become much more common but still is endemic only in small areas around
Northern California, I just happen to be unlucky enough to live in one!

Bonnie

Annie Wxill
April 8th 07, 05:21 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
...
....
> I use Interceptor for heartworm and intestinal worms, and Frontline Plus
> for fleas and ticks, on both my cats and my dogs. ...
> Lynne

Is Interceptor taken internally or applied externally? If it is taken
internally, is it available as pill or a liquid?

Annie

Lynne
April 8th 07, 05:36 PM
on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 16:21:49 GMT, "Annie Wxill" >
wrote:

> Is Interceptor taken internally or applied externally? If it is taken
> internally, is it available as pill or a liquid?

It's a pill that you give once a month. It's flavored and chewable, but my
cats won't eat it. It's small, though, and easy to administer. Placed far
enough back on the cat's tongue, it goes right down (I hold their chins up
and rub their throats, of course). It could also be ground up and
sprinkled on food, but I prefer not to do that in case they don't eat it
all.

--
Lynne

sheelagh
April 8th 07, 05:47 PM
On 8 Apr, 06:29, "22brix" > wrote:
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 7 Apr, 19:19, "22brix" > wrote:
> >> "sheelagh" > wrote in message >
> > Oh dear Bonnie, You certainly seem to be going through a bad patch
> > recently with all of the problems that you have had recently with
> > tortle,.& now this on top of it. I had no idea that some of your
> > feline family had cases like this. I most certainly feel for you- You
> > have enough to worry about without your latest distress to cope with.
> > You have our support & are in our thoughts too.
>
> > Thank you so much for the links too. I found them very informative, as
> > I did Mary's posting as well.
>
> > I did a tiny bit of research on the subject, & it seems that there was
> > a good reason to start thinking about protecting our cats, rather than
> > waiting for the problem to come to us, then having no chance to treat
> > it, through simple precautionary medication.
> > I will post a link to what I managed to dredge up from Googling &
> > Ask.com too.
> > It seems that there is a problem over here, even though it is not as
> > wide spread as the USA Heartworm infestations that you seem to have to
> > cope with.
>
> > It would seem that we have a similar type of worm that has been spread
> > via foxes, but brought into our country via dogs and cats visiting
> > Europe on our new pet passports that were introduced recently (in
> > their great wisdom!!)
>
> > I am going to post a link here in case there are other Uk'ers that are
> > not familiar with the problem, as I am sure that they are not informed
> > of it, any more than I was...
>
> > In fact I am quite shocked that we are not informed about this by our
> > vets either.
> > I do have a question though. Is there a difference between lung worm &
> > heart worm?
> > The reason I question this, is because it didn't make it clear. I
> > read a couple of articles about it & the general consensus is that
> > Revolution was the best all round product to cover most of them. But
> > having read Lynn's post I see that I might be misinformed here?
>
> > If any one could suggest a better product, I would be most grateful if
> > you would post about it. I am new to this problem so I have no idea
> > what is best for them & would appreciate your opinions on the products
> > & why you would choose that particular product. I have a sneaking
> > suspicion that the reason Revolution & Stronghold were mentioned was
> > because the sites were built by their manufacturers.
> > Thanks again to all of you,
> > S;o)
>
> >http://www.parkvets.com/clientinformation-angiostrongylus.html
>
> Hi Sheelagh,
>
> My experience with heartworm kitties was several years ago so I'm NOT having
> to deal with that right now, thank goodness!
>
> I looked at the site you posted--very interesting. I do some parasitology
> as part of my job but I'm not that familiar with animal parasites. Both
> "traditional" heartworm and this other bug are loosely categorized as
> roundworms but their modes of transmission are different--one by mosquitoes
> and I guess the other by snails. It looks like Interceptor would be an
> appropriate preventive--the active ingredient is milbemycin oxime which is
> one of the drugs listed. I don't know if cats get this, too. I just can't
> imagine most self-respecting cats being too interested in snails!
>
> Bonnie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thank you very much indeed Bonnie. I appreciate the trouble that you
went to & the advice that you were able to give me too. I can't find
Interceptor readily available in the UK, so it looks like I am going
to have to send away for it, or find out if any other manufacturer
sells it under a different brand name..?

( although, even doing that is less than desirable having read on here
somewhere recently, that it is better to avoid medicines from sources
that could possibly be suspect??)


the active ingredient is milbemycin oxime which is
> one of the drugs listed. I don't know if cats get this, too. I just can't
> imagine most self-respecting cats being too interested in snails!

This quote gave me a quick giggle to myself...MEET Biffy...

If it moves, Biffy is game for trying it, ROFLOL..It doesn't even need
to be legged; either in 2 legged or 4 legged or even a million
legged....
Biffy's other pet name is The mobile Dust Bin, because it it doesn't
grow, he will eat it.
I have never had a cat quite like him..He certainly is Unique, lol;o)
S;o)