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April 8th 07, 02:22 AM
Hello, My name is Gerri and I am the proud owner of a yellow male
tabby cat named Hotshot. Unfortuneately,he recently became ill showing
all of the signs of chronic renal failure due to melamine in cat food.
Thankfully,he did begin to recover with human foods only,and distilled
water. THIS is the KICKER!! As a nurse I knew the relationship between
phosphorous and calcium. I decided to give him milk and the results
were surprizeing. He appeared to almost immediately get better. I
cannot prove this other than by my own observations,but I thought I
should let people know. God Luck. Gerri

Lynne
April 8th 07, 02:34 AM
on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 01:22:13 GMT, "
> wrote:

> Hello, My name is Gerri and I am the proud owner of a yellow male
> tabby cat named Hotshot. Unfortuneately,he recently became ill showing
> all of the signs of chronic renal failure due to melamine in cat food.
> Thankfully,he did begin to recover with human foods only,and distilled
> water. THIS is the KICKER!! As a nurse I knew the relationship between
> phosphorous and calcium. I decided to give him milk and the results
> were surprizeing. He appeared to almost immediately get better. I
> cannot prove this other than by my own observations,but I thought I
> should let people know. God Luck. Gerri

Wow! I'm glad he's okay!!

Your vet can test Hotshot's urine for melamine, if you want to get
answers. It may be worth it just so that your vet can share his or her
findings in treating melamine poisoning with other vets, perhaps through
the FDA or through vet registries.

Personally, I'm skeptical that it's melamine that is causing problems for
the pets consuming the tainted food since they are finding it in such
small levels in the food. It's definitely something, though, and
melamine can at least serve as a marker for identifying whether or not
the sick animals have consumed tainted food. I wonder if it's not
formaldehyde, since milk binds with formaldehyde... hmmmm.

At any rate, talk to your vet about having your cat's urine tested for
melamine. It might not even cost you anything since if your vet is
anxious to help find a solution to this problem.

--
Lynne

Matthew
April 8th 07, 02:35 AM
Let me guess DID YOU GO TO THE VET or just home doctor the furball.

IF AND I SAY IF you cat had been exposed it will require more than what you
are doing.

> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello, My name is Gerri and I am the proud owner of a yellow male
> tabby cat named Hotshot. Unfortuneately,he recently became ill showing
> all of the signs of chronic renal failure due to melamine in cat food.
> Thankfully,he did begin to recover with human foods only,and distilled
> water. THIS is the KICKER!! As a nurse I knew the relationship between
> phosphorous and calcium. I decided to give him milk and the results
> were surprizeing. He appeared to almost immediately get better. I
> cannot prove this other than by my own observations,but I thought I
> should let people know. God Luck. Gerri
>

Matthew
April 8th 07, 02:41 AM
PS I am as glad he is doing better

> wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello, My name is Gerri and I am the proud owner of a yellow male
> tabby cat named Hotshot. Unfortuneately,he recently became ill showing
> all of the signs of chronic renal failure due to melamine in cat food.
> Thankfully,he did begin to recover with human foods only,and distilled
> water. THIS is the KICKER!! As a nurse I knew the relationship between
> phosphorous and calcium. I decided to give him milk and the results
> were surprizeing. He appeared to almost immediately get better. I
> cannot prove this other than by my own observations,but I thought I
> should let people know. God Luck. Gerri
>

Lynne
April 8th 07, 02:45 AM
on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 01:35:47 GMT, "Matthew"
> wrote:

> Let me guess DID YOU GO TO THE VET or just home doctor the furball.

Good point, and it didn't even occur to me that the OP might not have gone
to the vet.

> IF AND I SAY IF you cat had been exposed it will require more than
> what you are doing.

Another good point. Unless the OP had bloodwork done, the "obvious signs
of chronic kidney failure" is pure conjecture. Besides, wouldn't it be
acute kidney failure?? This whole post sounds fishy to me, now.

--
Lynne

sheelagh
April 8th 07, 02:20 PM
On 8 Apr, 02:34, Lynne > wrote:
> on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 01:22:13 GMT, "
>
> > wrote:
> > Hello, My name is Gerri and I am the proud owner of a yellow male
> > tabby cat named Hotshot. Unfortuneately,he recently became ill showing
> > all of the signs of chronic renal failure due to melamine in cat food.
> > Thankfully,he did begin to recover with human foods only,and distilled
> > water. THIS is the KICKER!! As a nurse I knew the relationship between
> > phosphorous and calcium. I decided to give him milk and the results
> > were surprizeing. He appeared to almost immediately get better. I
> > cannot prove this other than by my own observations,but I thought I
> > should let people know. God Luck. Gerri
>
> Wow! I'm glad he's okay!!
>
> Your vet can test Hotshot's urine for melamine, if you want to get
> answers. It may be worth it just so that your vet can share his or her
> findings in treating melamine poisoning with other vets, perhaps through
> the FDA or through vet registries.
>
> Personally, I'm skeptical that it's melamine that is causing problems for
> the pets consuming the tainted food since they are finding it in such
> small levels in the food. It's definitely something, though, and
> melamine can at least serve as a marker for identifying whether or not
> the sick animals have consumed tainted food. I wonder if it's not
> formaldehyde, since milk binds with formaldehyde... hmmmm.
>
> At any rate, talk to your vet about having your cat's urine tested for
> melamine. It might not even cost you anything since if your vet is
> anxious to help find a solution to this problem.
>
> --
> Lynne

Personally, I'm skeptical that it's melamine that is causing problems
for
> the pets consuming the tainted food since they are finding it in such
> small levels in the food. It's definitely something, though, and
> melamine can at least serve as a marker for identifying whether or not
> the sick animals have consumed tainted food. I wonder if it's not
> formaldehyde, since milk binds with formaldehyde... hmmmm.

Lynne, forgive my ignorance. What exactly is Formaldehyde & could you
possibly explain exactly what this latest incident regarding melamine
is exactly please?
I keep reading bits and pieces about it, but I don't understand the
cause or effect either?

Many Thanks,

S;o)

Lynne
April 8th 07, 02:48 PM
on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 13:20:15 GMT, "sheelagh"
> wrote:

> Lynne, forgive my ignorance. What exactly is Formaldehyde & could you
> possibly explain exactly what this latest incident regarding melamine
> is exactly please?
> I keep reading bits and pieces about it, but I don't understand the
> cause or effect either?
>
> Many Thanks,

Sheelagh, a good source of information about the recall here in the US is
collected here:
http://www.petconnection.com/recall_basics.php

This site also links to a list of the brands and formulations of recalled
foods, in which wheat gluten containing melamine was used for
manufacturing. I suspect the brand names are different in the UK.
Avoiding anything with wheat gluten can't hurt.

Formaldehyde (a chemical...) was a wild guess on my part as a possible
source of poisoning, based on the orginal post in this thread that
suggested milk helped--a post that I now find questionable.

--
Lynne

sheelagh
April 8th 07, 03:24 PM
On 8 Apr, 14:48, Lynne > wrote:
> on Sun, 08 Apr 2007 13:20:15 GMT, "sheelagh"
>
> > wrote:
> > Lynne, forgive my ignorance. What exactly is Formaldehyde & could you
> > possibly explain exactly what this latest incident regarding melamine
> > is exactly please?
> > I keep reading bits and pieces about it, but I don't understand the
> > cause or effect either?
>
> > Many Thanks,
>
> Sheelagh, a good source of information about the recall here in the US is
> collected here:http://www.petconnection.com/recall_basics.php
>
> This site also links to a list of the brands and formulations of recalled
> foods, in which wheat gluten containing melamine was used for
> manufacturing. I suspect the brand names are different in the UK.
> Avoiding anything with wheat gluten can't hurt.
>
> Formaldehyde (a chemical...) was a wild guess on my part as a possible
> source of poisoning, based on the orginal post in this thread that
> suggested milk helped--a post that I now find questionable.
>
> --
> Lynne

..
As ever, you are informative, precise and to the point too. A much
valued quality.

Thank you very much..
S;o)

William Hamblen
April 8th 07, 06:40 PM
On 8 Apr 2007 06:20:15 -0700, "sheelagh"
> wrote:

>What exactly is Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde is a chemical with one carbon atom, two hydrogen atoms
and one oxygen atom in the molecule. It has a sharp smell and is
highly soluble in water. It is used in the plastics industry and as a
preservative. Formaldehyde is extremely common. You find it in the
smoke from a wood fire, for example.

Melamine is a chemical with three carbon atoms, six nitrogen atoms and
six hydrogen atoms in the molecule. It is used in the plastics
industry. Melamine is mildly toxic. I looked it up in my old copy of
Dangerous Properties of Industrial Chemicals, which said that the LD50
for rats was 3161 mg per kg by mouth. "LD50" is the dose sufficient
to kill half of the experimental animals. It took a smidgen more than
3 grams of melamine per kilogram of rat to do them in.

You do crude protein analysis of food by measuring the amount of
ammonia that is given off by the product when it is chemically treated
to release the nitrogen in the protein molecules. Someone elsewhere
speculated that the wheat gluten supplier might have been tricking up
the analysis by adding melamine. Otherwise the contamination could
have occured by carelessness: using containers that once held
melamine to ship wheat gluten without giving the containers a good
cleaning.

Bud
--
The night is just the shadow of the Earth.