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Dom
April 9th 07, 04:32 PM
I adopted a cat (my first) that is 33 lbs, and I need help finding a
good food for him. I got him a mate to get him moving but no success
there.

He gets a 3oz can of wet food, and so does his mate, but I think he
takes most of his mate's food. I also give him about a cup of dry
food, and another cup for his mate, because I'm gone most of the day.
Again, I think he eats his mate's food.

I always look at labels and try to find one that has high protein,
some fat, some fiber and little carbs. (I know how to compute the Dry
Matter Basis). Oddly, the brands that are called "weight control"
don't seem to be as high in protein as some of the other brands. The
best I found is Fancy Feast Medleys. Is this right?

Am I doing the right thing? Any suggestions on brands?

Thanks,
Dom

cybercat
April 9th 07, 04:44 PM
"Dom" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I adopted a cat (my first) that is 33 lbs, and I need help finding a
> good food for him. I got him a mate to get him moving but no success
> there.
>
> He gets a 3oz can of wet food, and so does his mate, but I think he
> takes most of his mate's food. I also give him about a cup of dry
> food, and another cup for his mate, because I'm gone most of the day.
> Again, I think he eats his mate's food.
>
> I always look at labels and try to find one that has high protein,
> some fat, some fiber and little carbs. (I know how to compute the Dry
> Matter Basis). Oddly, the brands that are called "weight control"
> don't seem to be as high in protein as some of the other brands. The
> best I found is Fancy Feast Medleys. Is this right?
>
> Am I doing the right thing? Any suggestions on brands?
>

Dom, our tiny female was up to 18 lbs when she came to us. (She is
very small boned, so this was dangerously obese.) I fed her diet Iams
dry because that is what her owner fed her. Like your cat, I free fed
her, just left the bowl on the floor all day. She just got fatter.

You have the right idea about protein, and FF is what I feed, too, but
any canned food that has meat, fish, poultry as a first ingredient and no
or very few grains is fine. The thing is, you have to feed canned only
and feed every twelve hours. If you want her to him to lose weight you
will have to supervise feedings, because you have two cats. I feed my
skinny cat on the third floor and my fat cat on the first floor, then try
to remember to pick up what is left of the skinny cat's food before
the fat cat can sneak up to get it! If I had a single floor, I would feed
them in separate rooms with closed doors. If the skinny cat is like
mine and does not wolf it all, you could put his up on a counter or
table where the fat cat cannot jump. (Unless your cat can jump, mine
couldn't when she was that fat.

My fat girl eats two 3-oz cans a day because that is how much it takes
to keep her at nine pounds. (She lost 9 pounds in a year once I cut
out the dry.) Your big boy might need a can and a half twice a day.
My vet told me to feed canned only, and reduce it by 1/4 until the
cat begins to lose weight, so you want to start out on the heavy side.

Another thing about feeding every 12 hours is, it is better for cats
to wait this long between feedings. Phil P. once posted about this
but I have not retained the particulars.

As you have guessed, dry food is not the best food for cats because
of all the grains. In addition to the extra protein in canned, there is
extra water, and cats need that to stay healthy too.

If your skinny cat will not eat all of his wet food in the morning before
you
leave, and you can't put it up where the other cat cannot get it, you might
have a dilemma on your hands, as I surely would not separate them all
day, they need each other's company! What I do when my fat cat steals
Gracie's food is, I give her less in the evening and Gracie more.

Good luck! You're right to worry about your cat's weight, it can be a
killer.




--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Rene S.
April 9th 07, 06:52 PM
On Apr 9, 10:32 am, "Dom" > wrote:
> I adopted a cat (my first) that is 33 lbs, and I need help finding a
> good food for him. I got him a mate to get him moving but no success
> there.
>
> He gets a 3oz can of wet food, and so does his mate, but I think he
> takes most of his mate's food. I also give him about a cup of dry
> food, and another cup for his mate, because I'm gone most of the day.
> Again, I think he eats his mate's food.

Hi Dom,

My suggestion would be to feed your cats separately (in another room
works well), twice per day, about 12 hours apart. You need to monitor
the overweight cat's intake. Secondly, I would remove the dry food
from his diet and feed only canned. I personally had no luck with any
of the dry "weight loss" formulas, prescription or over the counter.
My cat actually gained weight on them! There's a good article about
feline nutrition here: http://www.catinfo.org/

My cat lost 6 lbs a couple of years ago on canned food. Here's his web
site. Feel free to email me if you have questions.

http://community-2.webtv.net/getcathelp/tucker/

Rene

Joe Canuck
April 9th 07, 07:07 PM
Dom wrote:
> I adopted a cat (my first) that is 33 lbs, and I need help finding a
> good food for him. I got him a mate to get him moving but no success
> there.
>
> He gets a 3oz can of wet food, and so does his mate, but I think he
> takes most of his mate's food. I also give him about a cup of dry
> food, and another cup for his mate, because I'm gone most of the day.
> Again, I think he eats his mate's food.
>
> I always look at labels and try to find one that has high protein,
> some fat, some fiber and little carbs. (I know how to compute the Dry
> Matter Basis). Oddly, the brands that are called "weight control"
> don't seem to be as high in protein as some of the other brands. The
> best I found is Fancy Feast Medleys. Is this right?
>
> Am I doing the right thing? Any suggestions on brands?
>
> Thanks,
> Dom
>

You will need to adopt a fixed feeding rather than free feeding schedule.

Suggest you and the cat visit the vet.

Dom
April 9th 07, 08:36 PM
Hi Rene:

Can you give me some advice on cat food. Reading labels, and making
conversions to DMB, makes me think that Fancy Feast Medley is a good
choice. But I'm concerned about that. FF seems like a commercial
brand that is not intended for obese cats. Yet, according to the
label, it is about the highest in protein, and lowest in carbs.

Thanks again
Dom


On Apr 9, 1:52 pm, "Rene S." > wrote:
> On Apr 9, 10:32 am, "Dom" > wrote:
>
> > I adopted a cat (my first) that is 33 lbs, and I need help finding a
> > good food for him. I got him a mate to get him moving but no success
> > there.
>
> > He gets a 3oz can of wet food, and so does his mate, but I think he
> > takes most of his mate's food. I also give him about a cup of dry
> > food, and another cup for his mate, because I'm gone most of the day.
> > Again, I think he eats his mate's food.
>
> Hi Dom,
>
> My suggestion would be to feed your cats separately (in another room
> works well), twice per day, about 12 hours apart. You need to monitor
> the overweight cat's intake. Secondly, I would remove the dry food
> from his diet and feed only canned. I personally had no luck with any
> of the dry "weight loss" formulas, prescription or over the counter.
> My cat actually gained weight on them! There's a good article about
> feline nutrition here:http://www.catinfo.org/
>
> My cat lost 6 lbs a couple of years ago on canned food. Here's his web
> site. Feel free to email me if you have questions.
>
> http://community-2.webtv.net/getcathelp/tucker/
>
> Rene

cybercat
April 9th 07, 09:02 PM
Dom" > wrote:>
> Am I doing the right thing? Any suggestions on brands?
>

Dom, our tiny female was up to 18 lbs when she came to us. (She is
very small boned, so this was dangerously obese.) I fed her diet Iams
dry because that is what her owner fed her. Like your cat, I free fed
her, just left the bowl on the floor all day. She just got fatter.

You have the right idea about protein, and FF is what I feed, too, but
any canned food that has meat, fish, poultry as a first ingredient and no
or very few grains is fine. The thing is, you have to feed canned only
and feed every twelve hours. If you want her to him to lose weight you
will have to supervise feedings, because you have two cats. I feed my
skinny cat on the third floor and my fat cat on the first floor, then try
to remember to pick up what is left of the skinny cat's food before
the fat cat can sneak up to get it! If I had a single floor, I would feed
them in separate rooms with closed doors. If the skinny cat is like
mine and does not wolf it all, you could put his up on a counter or
table where the fat cat cannot jump. (Unless your cat can jump, mine
couldn't when she was that fat.

My fat girl eats two 3-oz cans a day because that is how much it takes
to keep her at nine pounds. (She lost 9 pounds in a year once I cut
out the dry.) Your big boy might need a can and a half twice a day.
My vet told me to feed canned only, and reduce it by 1/4 until the
cat begins to lose weight, so you want to start out on the heavy side.

Another thing about feeding every 12 hours is, it is better for cats
to wait this long between feedings. Phil P. once posted about this
but I have not retained the particulars.

As you have guessed, dry food is not the best food for cats because
of all the grains. In addition to the extra protein in canned, there is
extra water, and cats need that to stay healthy too.

If your skinny cat will not eat all of his wet food in the morning before
you
leave, and you can't put it up where the other cat cannot get it, you might
have a dilemma on your hands, as I surely would not separate them all
day, they need each other's company! What I do when my fat cat steals
Gracie's food is, I give her less in the evening and Gracie more.

Good luck! You're right to worry about your cat's weight, it can be a
killer.

Dom
April 9th 07, 09:57 PM
This is great, cybercat. Just what I needed.

Dom

On Apr 9, 4:02 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> Dom" > wrote:>
> > Am I doing the right thing? Any suggestions on brands?
>
> Dom, our tiny female was up to 18 lbs when she came to us. (She is
> very small boned, so this was dangerously obese.) I fed her diet Iams
> dry because that is what her owner fed her. Like your cat, I free fed
> her, just left the bowl on the floor all day. She just got fatter.
>
> You have the right idea about protein, and FF is what I feed, too, but
> any canned food that has meat, fish, poultry as a first ingredient and no
> or very few grains is fine. The thing is, you have to feed canned only
> and feed every twelve hours. If you want her to him to lose weight you
> will have to supervise feedings, because you have two cats. I feed my
> skinny cat on the third floor and my fat cat on the first floor, then try
> to remember to pick up what is left of the skinny cat's food before
> the fat cat can sneak up to get it! If I had a single floor, I would feed
> them in separate rooms with closed doors. If the skinny cat is like
> mine and does not wolf it all, you could put his up on a counter or
> table where the fat cat cannot jump. (Unless your cat can jump, mine
> couldn't when she was that fat.
>
> My fat girl eats two 3-oz cans a day because that is how much it takes
> to keep her at nine pounds. (She lost 9 pounds in a year once I cut
> out the dry.) Your big boy might need a can and a half twice a day.
> My vet told me to feed canned only, and reduce it by 1/4 until the
> cat begins to lose weight, so you want to start out on the heavy side.
>
> Another thing about feeding every 12 hours is, it is better for cats
> to wait this long between feedings. Phil P. once posted about this
> but I have not retained the particulars.
>
> As you have guessed, dry food is not the best food for cats because
> of all the grains. In addition to the extra protein in canned, there is
> extra water, and cats need that to stay healthy too.
>
> If your skinny cat will not eat all of his wet food in the morning before
> you
> leave, and you can't put it up where the other cat cannot get it, you might
> have a dilemma on your hands, as I surely would not separate them all
> day, they need each other's company! What I do when my fat cat steals
> Gracie's food is, I give her less in the evening and Gracie more.
>
> Good luck! You're right to worry about your cat's weight, it can be a
> killer.

Rene S.
April 9th 07, 10:02 PM
On Apr 9, 2:36 pm, "Dom" > wrote:
> Hi Rene:
>
> Can you give me some advice on cat food. Reading labels, and making
> conversions to DMB, makes me think that Fancy Feast Medley is a good
> choice. But I'm concerned about that. FF seems like a commercial
> brand that is not intended for obese cats. Yet, according to the
> label, it is about the highest in protein, and lowest in carbs.
>
> Thanks again
> Dom

cybercat has already given you some advice. I'm not crazy about
feeding FF (just my opinion, I know others here use it). I prefer the
premium brands that have human-grade ingredients and no grains. Some
examples are Wellness, Innova, Royal Canin, Nature's Variety--and I'm
sure there are others. Most important is to read the ingredient list.
Things like "meal," "by-products," and of course, grains, are not high-
quality ingredients.

cybercat
April 9th 07, 11:09 PM
"Dom" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> This is great, cybercat. Just what I needed.
>
> Dom
>

Good luck! Choose varieties of Fancy Feast that have beef, chicken,
liver, etc. as a first ingredient. Some have "meat byproducts" as a first
ingredient, and even though I know I am being silly given what cats
eat when they eat prey, I like giving mine regular meat as a first
ingredient. Fancy Feast has improved in nutrition a great deal since
Purina bought the company a few years ago. As for "human grade"
ingredients, as Rene prefers, I guess that is what is meant by non
-by-product meats. Wellness etc., at twice the price as FF, includes
items such as blueberries which cats do NOT need. In addition, there
are some varieties of Wellness that contain garlic which has proven
to cause anemia in cats. FF is about the best you can do for 50
a can, IME.

Joe Canuck
April 9th 07, 11:24 PM
cybercat wrote:
> "Dom" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> This is great, cybercat. Just what I needed.
>>
>> Dom
>>
>
> Good luck! Choose varieties of Fancy Feast that have beef, chicken,
> liver, etc. as a first ingredient. Some have "meat byproducts" as a first
> ingredient,

The problem with the "first ingredient" approach is that often
ingredients lower in the list can be combined to be greater in overall
volume than the first ingredient listed.

As example: The first ingredient is listed as chicken meat. The 2nd and
3rd ingredients are listed as "meat byproducts", but when those 2nd and
3rd ingredients are combined they overtake the first ingredient in terms
of volume.


> and even though I know I am being silly given what cats
> eat when they eat prey, I like giving mine regular meat as a first
> ingredient. Fancy Feast has improved in nutrition a great deal since
> Purina bought the company a few years ago. As for "human grade"
> ingredients, as Rene prefers, I guess that is what is meant by non
> -by-product meats. Wellness etc., at twice the price as FF, includes
> items such as blueberries which cats do NOT need. In addition, there
> are some varieties of Wellness that contain garlic which has proven
> to cause anemia in cats. FF is about the best you can do for 50
> a can, IME.
>
>

cybercat
April 10th 07, 12:05 AM
"Joe Canuck" > wrote
>> Good luck! Choose varieties of Fancy Feast that have beef, chicken,
>> liver, etc. as a first ingredient. Some have "meat byproducts" as a first
>> ingredient,
>
> The problem with the "first ingredient" approach is that often ingredients
> lower in the list can be combined to be greater in overall volume than the
> first ingredient listed.
>
> As example: The first ingredient is listed as chicken meat. The 2nd and
> 3rd ingredients are listed as "meat byproducts", but when those 2nd and
> 3rd ingredients are combined they overtake the first ingredient in terms
> of volume.

I can see this. I am not at all convinced that meat byproducts are bad for
cats, though.

Rene S.
April 10th 07, 03:22 PM
> > I always look at labels and try to find one that has high protein,
> > some fat, some fiber and little carbs. (I know how to compute the Dry
>> You have the right idea about protein, and FF is what I feed, too, but
> any canned food that has meat, fish, poultry as a first ingredient and no
> or very few grains is fine. The thing is, you have to feed canned only
> and feed every twelve hours. If you want her to him to lose weight you
> will have to supervise feedings, because you have two cats. I feed my
> skinny cat on the third floor and my fat cat on the first floor, then try
> to remember to pick up what is left of the skinny cat's food before
> the fat cat can sneak up to get it! If I had a single floor, I would feed
> them in separate rooms with closed doors. If the skinny cat is like
> mine and does not wolf it all, you could put his up on a counter or
> table where the fat cat cannot jump. (Unless your cat can jump, mine
> couldn't when she was that fat.

I feed my cats in two different rooms. One is shut in an office (with
a litterbox) and the other is fed in the kitchen while I get ready for
work (about 20-30 minutes). In the evening, I feed them both in the
kitchen, but I am there making supper so I supervise. This works out
great for me.

> Another thing about feeding every 12 hours is, it is better for cats
> to wait this long between feedings. Phil P. once posted about this
> but I have not retained the particulars.

My understanding is that this schedule is more like what cats would
eat in the wild. They don't have 24 access to food in the wild; they
catch prey when they find it. If you are a couple of hours late with a
meal, it's not a big deal. Cats in the wild don't eat on a schedule.

cybercat
April 10th 07, 05:50 PM
"Rene S." > wrote
>. If you are a couple of hours late with a
> meal, it's not a big deal.

Tell that to my formerly fat little Tuxedo Terrorist!

She comes to whereever I am long before it is feeding
time, and stares holes into me. When I look up at her
she wheels on her heel in a decidedly disgusted way and
stomps off to the kitchen, stands there and waits until
I appear, then turns on her heel again, cussing me in
cat. Then she slaps at my feet while I open the can,
slaps at my hand when I pick up her water dish to
refill it, cussing all the time. I feel like I'm going to look
up and see her with a little pistol in her paw one of these
times.

But Rene, she is so much healthier, shiny, and fiesty than
she was on the dry food.

Rene S.
April 10th 07, 07:49 PM
> She comes to whereever I am long before it is feeding
> time, and stares holes into me. When I look up at her
> she wheels on her heel in a decidedly disgusted way and
> stomps off to the kitchen, stands there and waits until
> I appear, then turns on her heel again, cussing me in
> cat. Then she slaps at my feet while I open the can,
> slaps at my hand when I pick up her water dish to
> refill it, cussing all the time. I feel like I'm going to look
> up and see her with a little pistol in her paw one of these
> times.
>
> But Rene, she is so much healthier, shiny, and fiesty than
> she was on the dry food.

Heh, heh, I have a cat (the one who lost the weight) who is an
"opportunist," and I can't leave any food out b/c he'll try and eat
it. I weigh him regularly and he's stable, so he *thinks* he's
starving when he's not. (He was a stray, so perhaps that's just stuck
with him.)

I agree that he is also healthier than ever on wet food.

Cheryl
April 11th 07, 03:13 AM
On Mon 09 Apr 2007 07:05:39p, cybercat wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:

>> As example: The first ingredient is listed as chicken meat. The
>> 2nd and 3rd ingredients are listed as "meat byproducts", but
>> when those 2nd and 3rd ingredients are combined they overtake
>> the first ingredient in terms of volume.
>
> I can see this. I am not at all convinced that meat byproducts
> are bad for cats, though.

My opinion after reading about the subject is that by-products are
not bad. The trouble is in identifying what species the by-product
came from. Meat by-product could be from any animal that isn't
fowl or fish. That leaves quite a few animals. Chicken by-products
will be from chicken, beef by-products will be from cows, fish
byproduct will be from fish. Etc. There are horror stories that
"meat byproducts" may come from euthanized pets. Don't know the
credibility behind that claim, but if you see "poultry byproducts"
or better yet "chicken byproducts" the ingredient comes from
poultry/chicken.

Ingredient listing of "meal" just means the liquid content was
removed before it was made into pet food. Concentrated. But it
could include fat, bone, and other pieces that add to phosphorus
content. Meal can be either meat or veggie. Read the nutrient
value in addition to what the food is made of.

--
Cheryl

Joe Canuck
April 11th 07, 03:25 AM
Cheryl wrote:
> On Mon 09 Apr 2007 07:05:39p, cybercat wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:
>
>>> As example: The first ingredient is listed as chicken meat. The
>>> 2nd and 3rd ingredients are listed as "meat byproducts", but
>>> when those 2nd and 3rd ingredients are combined they overtake
>>> the first ingredient in terms of volume.
>> I can see this. I am not at all convinced that meat byproducts
>> are bad for cats, though.
>
> My opinion after reading about the subject is that by-products are
> not bad. The trouble is in identifying what species the by-product
> came from. Meat by-product could be from any animal that isn't
> fowl or fish. That leaves quite a few animals. Chicken by-products
> will be from chicken, beef by-products will be from cows, fish
> byproduct will be from fish. Etc. There are horror stories that
> "meat byproducts" may come from euthanized pets. Don't know the
> credibility behind that claim, but if you see "poultry byproducts"
> or better yet "chicken byproducts" the ingredient comes from
> poultry/chicken.
>
> Ingredient listing of "meal" just means the liquid content was
> removed before it was made into pet food. Concentrated. But it
> could include fat, bone, and other pieces that add to phosphorus
> content. Meal can be either meat or veggie. Read the nutrient
> value in addition to what the food is made of.
>

Given the current pet food disaster... I'm less willing to give the pet
food companies the benefit of the doubt when it comes to ingredients.

cybercat
April 11th 07, 05:27 PM
"Rene S." > wrote
>
> Heh, heh, I have a cat (the one who lost the weight) who is an
> "opportunist," and I can't leave any food out b/c he'll try and eat
> it. I weigh him regularly and he's stable, so he *thinks* he's
> starving when he's not. (He was a stray, so perhaps that's just stuck
> with him.)

The reason my tuxedo girl is like this is that her first owner
expressed his love with "goodies" and left her alone with
the dry food a bit too much. (He began traveling a lot, and
this is why he gave her to us.) It did not help that she was
undiagnosed hyper thyroid for years--a symptom is ravenous
hunger. (But she was an odd case, because instead of being
thin like most hyperT cats she was fat. Only her high heartrate
(over 300 bpm, so fast you can barely count it) and a thyroid
blood test gave it away.

But it seems to be rather common, that one cat is obsessed with
food and another is rather indifferent.

This cat has always been assertive, it is just her nature. She
is a lap cat, but with an attitude. She will get comfortable,
and if you move, she complains. If you don't stop, she hisses
and stomps off. :) It's hilarious. Ditto to touching her tail. She
adores my husband and loves to sit next to him on he couch
while he watches tv, but if he touches her tail, she bitches him
out, hisses, and stomps off. She also, when a kitten, went so
bonkers if a cat came to the big window, she once had a case
of redirected aggression and went for my husband's ankles. I
was appalled but my husband and his father thought it was
funny.

Another thing she did, was every time she passed a particular
glazed ceramic planter, her reflection caught her eye and she
slapped at it. She's just funny. :)

>
> I agree that he is also healthier than ever on wet food.
>

Lynne
April 11th 07, 05:35 PM
on Wed, 11 Apr 2007 16:27:11 GMT, "cybercat" >
wrote:

> Only her high heartrate
> (over 300 bpm, so fast you can barely count it) and a thyroid
> blood test gave it away.

At what age can hyperthyroid be diagnosed? Levi has bouts of fast
heartrate and the vet said he was too young to have hyperthyroidism.
Does that sound right??

> But it seems to be rather common, that one cat is obsessed with
> food and another is rather indifferent.
>
> This cat has always been assertive, it is just her nature. She
> is a lap cat, but with an attitude. She will get comfortable,
> and if you move, she complains. If you don't stop, she hisses
> and stomps off. :) It's hilarious. Ditto to touching her tail. She
> adores my husband and loves to sit next to him on he couch
> while he watches tv, but if he touches her tail, she bitches him
> out, hisses, and stomps off. She also, when a kitten, went so
> bonkers if a cat came to the big window, she once had a case
> of redirected aggression and went for my husband's ankles. I
> was appalled but my husband and his father thought it was
> funny.
>
> Another thing she did, was every time she passed a particular
> glazed ceramic planter, her reflection caught her eye and she
> slapped at it. She's just funny. :)

She sounds like a very fun cat.

--
Lynne

cybercat
April 11th 07, 06:39 PM
"Lynne" > wrote in message
m...
> on Wed, 11 Apr 2007 16:27:11 GMT, "cybercat" >
> wrote:
>
>> Only her high heartrate
>> (over 300 bpm, so fast you can barely count it) and a thyroid
>> blood test gave it away.
>
> At what age can hyperthyroid be diagnosed? Levi has bouts of fast
> heartrate and the vet said he was too young to have hyperthyroidism.
> Does that sound right??
>

Boo was finally diagnosed at age 8, but the vet thinks she had the disorder
for a while. It is much more common in cats over age 7 or so.

Levi's heart rate would be fast all the time, not just in episodes, if my
understanding of the disease is correct. A normal heart rate for an adult
cat might be 150-180. When I asked my vet if Boo's 300 bpm rate
might be due to the fact that being at the vet's upset her, he said, "a
really high heart rate due to anxiety might be 200. 300 is off the charts."

Other symptoms are abnormal vocalizing--you're in the kitchen and you
hear Levi howling upstair, or in the middle of the night when you are
sleeping--and he has food, water, there's no explanation you can find--and
what my vet called "hypervigilance." Boo was always hyperalert. None
of that sleepy-slitty-eyed cat stuff for her, she was always wide-eyed,
expectant, irritable. If you picked her up and she wanted down, she
would not avert her eyes and meow and squirm, she would stiffarm
you like she was trying to push her feet through your chest and eyeball
you, with the nastiest expression on her face. :) Yes, she is a funny
girl. Another symptom is an unkempt looking coat, with dandruff.
And of course ravenous hunger.

I bet your vet would do a blood panel for you just to make sure. It's
a simple enough test.

Lynne
April 11th 07, 06:53 PM
on Wed, 11 Apr 2007 17:39:04 GMT, "cybercat" >
wrote:

> Boo was finally diagnosed at age 8, but the vet thinks she had the
> disorder for a while. It is much more common in cats over age 7 or so.
>
> Levi's heart rate would be fast all the time, not just in episodes, if
> my understanding of the disease is correct. A normal heart rate for an
> adult cat might be 150-180. When I asked my vet if Boo's 300 bpm rate
> might be due to the fact that being at the vet's upset her, he said,
> "a really high heart rate due to anxiety might be 200. 300 is off the
> charts."
>
> Other symptoms are abnormal vocalizing--you're in the kitchen and you
> hear Levi howling upstair, or in the middle of the night when you are
> sleeping--and he has food, water, there's no explanation you can
> find--and what my vet called "hypervigilance." Boo was always
> hyperalert. None of that sleepy-slitty-eyed cat stuff for her, she was
> always wide-eyed, expectant, irritable. If you picked her up and she
> wanted down, she would not avert her eyes and meow and squirm, she
> would stiffarm you like she was trying to push her feet through your
> chest and eyeball you, with the nastiest expression on her face. :)
> Yes, she is a funny girl. Another symptom is an unkempt looking coat,
> with dandruff. And of course ravenous hunger.
>
> I bet your vet would do a blood panel for you just to make sure. It's
> a simple enough test.

Hell, that all sounds more like Rudy! He has started vocalizing for no
apparent reason recently, every night around the same time. He's also
got dandruff, no matter how much I brush him, and ravenous hunger. He's
no more irritable than he's always been, when I don't do things *just*
right, hehe. He's only 3 and he's FAT, but I'm going to have him
checked.

Levi doesn't fit the profile at all, but does have episodes of fast heart
rate (and respiration!) at rest and the vet didn't think it was anything
to worry about. He discounted it as a recurring URI from FHV (which, of
course, it could very well be). Both boys are going to get some
bloodwork done just to be safe.

--
Lynne

cybercat
April 11th 07, 07:53 PM
"Lynne" > wrote
> Both boys are going to get some
> bloodwork done just to be safe.
>


Good, Lynne. The biggest danger is that a hyperT cat will
"throw a clot" as my vet said, which I guess means have
a stroke, but could mean a pulmonary embolism, I guess.

Boo's went undiagnosed for long enough that she
developed arythmia--perhaps from having such a
fast heart rate for so long. This resulted in little
seizure-like fainting spells, where she was unresponsive,
kind of feeling around in a circle, listing to one side.

The vet put her on a beta blocker to stabilize her
heart rate three years ago and as long as I keep her
on them, she is fine.