PDA

View Full Version : UC Davis wants suspect pet food and cat urine


buglady
April 11th 07, 11:07 AM
A UC David toxicology lab (that found melamine in unrecalled Nutro food
recently) is asking vets to contact them about testing possibly contaminated
food. They also want cat urine to test.....yesterday.

http://www.sacbee.com/101/story/153049.html
Pet food recall expands again
UCD toxicology lab detects tainted varieties not on FDA list, triggering a
wider alarm.
By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg - Bee Staff Writer
Published 12:00 am PDT Wednesday, April 11, 2007
----------
[,,]In light of the new findings, toxicologists at UC Davis' California
Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System are stepping up their offer
to test other, unrecalled foods to ensure all problems are found.

"There aren't that many labs that are doing this kind of testing right now.
It's our obligation to follow up," said Bob Poppenga, a UC Davis professor
of veterinary clinical toxicology.

The lab is encouraging veterinarians to contact it through its Web site,
http://cahfs.ucdavis.edu/, to arrange testing of food eaten by pets hit with
acute kidney failure.

At first, said Poppenga, lab toxicologists had offered to test unrecalled
foods in an effort to reassure owners that something else may have caused
the kidney failures.

Now that the lab has had a direct role in expanding the recall, its experts
are hoping to help get to the bottom of what's safe and what isn't.

"We're committed to helping each vet and owner," said toxicology professor
Birgit Puschner. She added that she doesn't expect the lab to be overwhelmed
by the workload as long as pet owners seeking tests make arrangements
through their vets.[,,]
They think they're close to developing the test, but would like vets to
provide some urine samples from ailing cats to help refine the new tests.

"I'd love some yesterday," said analytical chemist Mike Filigenzi.
------------------------------------
From the reporter who broke the story on melamine:
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/rss/s_502101.html
Researchers, however, are making strides toward uncovering what has sickened
cats and dogs nationwide. A lead scientist said yesterday he is convinced a
second contaminant was in the wheat gluten, which FDA and independent
researchers said was laced with high amounts of melamine, a chemical used in
plastics.
Dr. Richard Goldstein, associate professor of medicine at Cornell University
’s College of Veterinary Medicine and a kidney specialist who is researching
the outbreak’s health impact on pets, said he and other researchers saw what
they believe is a second contaminant in the gluten and the urine of infected
animals, but have yet to identify it. Cornell is among labs working with the
FDA.

“The concerted effort now is to identify what else is in there, and what’s
in the crystals” of infected animals’ urine and tissue, Goldstein said.

She also reports the numbers:
http://pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/rss/s_501983.html

buglady
take out the dog before replying

mariib via CatKB.com
April 11th 07, 04:06 PM
thanks for all your very timely warnings & updates about the mess re pet food
industry. I'm seeing very relevant information coming from both you & whoever
is posting as Anonyma. And I always remember the warnings from my late ex-Vet
husband - never never feed only one brand or one manufacturer's (pet) food,
feed a wide variety because ........ & this was coming from someone who had
worked at times as a federal food inspector - BUT that was then - then being
the late '70's & '80s & he wouldn't have known today's situation where a
significant proportion of the pet food is being manufactured under so many
brand names by one manufacturer.
M

buglady wrote:
>A UC David toxicology lab (that found melamine in unrecalled Nutro food
>recently) is asking vets to contact them about testing possibly contaminated
>food. They also want cat urine to test.....yesterday.
>
>http://www.sacbee.com/101/story/153049.html
>Pet food recall expands again
>UCD toxicology lab detects tainted varieties not on FDA list, triggering a
>wider alarm.
>By Carrie Peyton Dahlberg - Bee Staff Writer
>Published 12:00 am PDT Wednesday, April 11, 2007
>----------
>[,,]In light of the new findings, toxicologists at UC Davis' California
>Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory System are stepping up their offer
>to test other, unrecalled foods to ensure all problems are found.
>
>"There aren't that many labs that are doing this kind of testing right now.
>It's our obligation to follow up," said Bob Poppenga, a UC Davis professor
>of veterinary clinical toxicology.
>
>The lab is encouraging veterinarians to contact it through its Web site,
>http://cahfs.ucdavis.edu/, to arrange testing of food eaten by pets hit with
>acute kidney failure.
>
>At first, said Poppenga, lab toxicologists had offered to test unrecalled
>foods in an effort to reassure owners that something else may have caused
>the kidney failures.
>
>Now that the lab has had a direct role in expanding the recall, its experts
>are hoping to help get to the bottom of what's safe and what isn't.
>
>"We're committed to helping each vet and owner," said toxicology professor
>Birgit Puschner. She added that she doesn't expect the lab to be overwhelmed
>by the workload as long as pet owners seeking tests make arrangements
>through their vets.[,,]
>They think they're close to developing the test, but would like vets to
>provide some urine samples from ailing cats to help refine the new tests.
>
>"I'd love some yesterday," said analytical chemist Mike Filigenzi.
>------------------------------------
>From the reporter who broke the story on melamine:
>http://pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/rss/s_502101.html
>Researchers, however, are making strides toward uncovering what has sickened
>cats and dogs nationwide. A lead scientist said yesterday he is convinced a
>second contaminant was in the wheat gluten, which FDA and independent
>researchers said was laced with high amounts of melamine, a chemical used in
>plastics.
>Dr. Richard Goldstein, associate professor of medicine at Cornell University
>’s College of Veterinary Medicine and a kidney specialist who is researching
>the outbreak’s health impact on pets, said he and other researchers saw what
>they believe is a second contaminant in the gluten and the urine of infected
>animals, but have yet to identify it. Cornell is among labs working with the
>FDA.
>
>“The concerted effort now is to identify what else is in there, and what’s
>in the crystals” of infected animals’ urine and tissue, Goldstein said.
>
>She also reports the numbers:
>http://pittsburghlive.com/x/pittsburghtrib/news/rss/s_501983.html
>
>buglady
>take out the dog before replying

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200704/1