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View Full Version : Hardwood floor refinishing and cats?


Shaynelle
April 13th 07, 07:41 PM
We have two 17 yr old cats and we are getting our hardwood floors
refinished next week. We humans have to move into a hotel for about
3-5 days but we don't know what to do with our cats. The hotel doesn't
take animals, and we can't stay in another hotel due to expense (its a
military hotel and 1/4 the price of other hotels). It breaks my
heart to stick them in a kennel where they will be stressed the whole
time in the unfamiliar environment.

I don't want to keep them in the home, although we have considered
(since only the main floor is being redone) keeping them in our room
with all the windows open and a damp towel outside the bedroom door to
keep out the fumes. Since they are older they tend to sleep all day
on our bed anyway, so I know they will be more comfortable and less
stressed here than in a kennel. But I still am worried about the
fumes. I can't think of what on earth to do.

We would be visiting them twice a day in the house to feed them as
they eat a RAW diet and so we could cuddle with them and keep an eye
on the fumes in case they are stronger than expected in the bedroom.

Any advice or other suggestions?

Shaynelle

cybercat
April 13th 07, 07:45 PM
"Shaynelle" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> We have two 17 yr old cats and we are getting our hardwood floors
> refinished next week. We humans have to move into a hotel for about
> 3-5 days but we don't know what to do with our cats. The hotel doesn't
> take animals, and we can't stay in another hotel due to expense (its a
> military hotel and 1/4 the price of other hotels). It breaks my
> heart to stick them in a kennel where they will be stressed the whole
> time in the unfamiliar environment.

Either find the money to stay in a place that will let you keep your cats
or board them. The fumes could kill them or make them very sick.
Extended Stay hotels charge $69 per night for stays less than a week,
and $49 for stays more than a week and they allow pets. They also
have a full kitchen where you can store and cook food, and every
one I have been to has been very clean.

If you can afford to have your floors refinished, you can come up with
a few hundred bucks for a hotel.

Annie Wxill
April 13th 07, 10:54 PM
"Shaynelle" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> We have two 17 yr old cats and we are getting our hardwood floors
> refinished next week. We humans have to move into a hotel for about
> 3-5 days but we don't know what to do with our cats. The hotel doesn't
> take animals, and we can't stay in another hotel due to expense (its a
> military hotel and 1/4 the price of other hotels). ...
> Shaynelle
>
I would not expose cats of any age to those fumes. If it is not safe for
you to stay in your house, it is not safe for them. It could even be worse
for them than for you.

If you are in the U.S., you can check around and find hotels in your area
that offer discounted rates to military and allow pets. Most of the Motel 6
chain motels take pets and cost less than the average price. I think it's
the Super 6 motels that have kitchenettes.

Otherwise, the cats would be better off being boarded for a few days. Some
places will let you pay half or a reduced price if your cats are close
enough friends to stay in the same cage.

If you don't think you can afford a motel that will take pets, maybe you can
board the cats and you stay with friends.

Annie

Shaynelle
April 13th 07, 11:44 PM
Wow, I have never received such a rude reply when asking for advice.
Why would you be so rude to someone asking for advice?

I am not in the US by the way, so hotels are not anywhere near what
you state, and you assume we are paying for the floors to be done then
verbally express anger about it. Not a very productive reply to
someone who was simply asking for advice. I hope others will not be
so rude in their replies :(



On Apr 13, 1:45 pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Shaynelle" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > We have two 17 yr old cats and we are getting our hardwood floors
> > refinished next week. We humans have to move into a hotel for about
> > 3-5 days but we don't know what to do with our cats. The hotel doesn't
> > take animals, and we can't stay in another hotel due to expense (its a
> > military hotel and 1/4 the price of other hotels). It breaks my
> > heart to stick them in a kennel where they will be stressed the whole
> > time in the unfamiliar environment.
>
> Either find the money to stay in a place that will let you keep your cats
> or board them. The fumes could kill them or make them very sick.
> Extended Stay hotels charge $69 per night for stays less than a week,
> and $49 for stays more than a week and they allow pets. They also
> have a full kitchen where you can store and cook food, and every
> one I have been to has been very clean.
>
> If you can afford to have your floors refinished, you can come up with
> a few hundred bucks for a hotel.

Shaynelle
April 13th 07, 11:47 PM
Thanks Annie,

It would work out a lot cheaper for us to board the cats and stay in
the military hotel, and I suppose that may be the best route to go. I
am just concerned about the stress involved in putting them in a
kennel. We are going to check a few kennels out this coming weekend
and hope to find one that either is cats only, or keeps the cats far
away from the dogs (my cats are really scared of larger dogs).

Has anyone else had to put their older cats in a kennel? How did the
cats react - were they really stressed out?

Thanks!

On Apr 13, 4:54 pm, "Annie Wxill" > wrote:
> "Shaynelle" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...> We have two 17 yr old cats and we are getting our hardwood floors
> > refinished next week. We humans have to move into a hotel for about
> > 3-5 days but we don't know what to do with our cats. The hotel doesn't
> > take animals, and we can't stay in another hotel due to expense (its a
> > military hotel and 1/4 the price of other hotels). ...
> >Shaynelle
>
> I would not expose cats of any age to those fumes. If it is not safe for
> you to stay in your house, it is not safe for them. It could even be worse
> for them than for you.
>
> If you are in the U.S., you can check around and find hotels in your area
> that offer discounted rates to military and allow pets. Most of the Motel 6
> chain motels take pets and cost less than the average price. I think it's
> the Super 6 motels that have kitchenettes.
>
> Otherwise, the cats would be better off being boarded for a few days. Some
> places will let you pay half or a reduced price if your cats are close
> enough friends to stay in the same cage.
>
> If you don't think you can afford a motel that will take pets, maybe you can
> board the cats and you stay with friends.
>
> Annie

cybercat
April 13th 07, 11:49 PM
"Shaynelle" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Wow, I have never received such a rude reply when asking for advice.
> Why would you be so rude to someone asking for advice?

There was nothing at all rude about my reply. I was simply direct.

>
> I am not in the US by the way, so hotels are not anywhere near what
> you state, and you assume we are paying for the floors to be done then
> verbally express anger about it. Not a very productive reply to
> someone who was simply asking for advice. I hope others will not be
> so rude in their replies :(
>

What can anyone tell you except to board them or relent and pay
for a hotel that will let you keep them with you?

Do you imagine anyone will tell you to leave them in the house
where the fumes may very well make them very sick? Their
noses are a lot more sensitive than ours.

I think you need to learn the difference between someone telling
you a simple truth you just don't want to hear, and someone
being rude.

If someone else is paying to refinish your floors, them you are
likely renting or the army is paying for it. If so, they should pay
for a place for you to stay that includes pets, or for the boarding.

If not, cough it up. Spend the money making sure your cats are
happy and safe, and for heaven's sake don't leave them in the
place with dangerous fumes and workers who may or may not
let them out.

cybercat
April 14th 07, 12:03 AM
"Shaynelle" > wrote in
>
> I am not in the US by the way, so hotels are not anywhere near what
> you state


Well, there are certainly plenty of hotels that allow pets where you live.

http://www.petfriendly.ca/rentals.php?id=4

mariib via CatKB.com
April 14th 07, 12:22 AM
Shaynelle wrote:
>We have two 17 yr old cats and we are getting our hardwood floors
>refinished next week. We humans have to move into a hotel for about
>3-5 days but we don't know what to do with our cats. The hotel doesn't
>take animals, and we can't stay in another hotel due to expense (its a
>military hotel and 1/4 the price of other hotels). It breaks my
>heart to stick them in a kennel where they will be stressed the whole
>time in the unfamiliar environment.
>
>I don't want to keep them in the home, although we have considered
>(since only the main floor is being redone) keeping them in our room
>with all the windows open and a damp towel outside the bedroom door to
>keep out the fumes. Since they are older they tend to sleep all day
>on our bed anyway, so I know they will be more comfortable and less
>stressed here than in a kennel. But I still am worried about the
>fumes. I can't think of what on earth to do.
>
>We would be visiting them twice a day in the house to feed them as
>they eat a RAW diet and so we could cuddle with them and keep an eye
>on the fumes in case they are stronger than expected in the bedroom.
>
>Any advice or other suggestions?
>
>Shaynelle

Where exactly are you - in a big city or not? I know you're Canadian but
perhaps you're now posted overseas? In any case, I've always had good luck
over the years boarding my cats (both young & old) in a vet clinic - the best
would be a cat-only practice because mixed boarding with barking dogs can be
very stressful to cats not used to dogs. I'd guess cats could still smell
dogs in a kennel even when separated by rooms or floors.

Good luck.
M.

--
Message posted via http://www.catkb.com

cybercat
April 14th 07, 12:37 AM
"mariib via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote
>
> Where exactly are you - in a big city or not?

She's in Winnipeg. And she had lots of good suggestions
last November.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

cybercat
April 14th 07, 12:39 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
.. .
>
> "mariib via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote
>>
>> Where exactly are you - in a big city or not?
>
> She's in Winnipeg. And she had lots of good suggestions
> last November.

Correction. Three days ago, I read the date wrong.

Three days ago others in Winnipeg made recommendations to her.

cybercat
April 14th 07, 12:39 AM
"mariib via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote
> Where exactly are you - in a big city or not?

Winnipeg. See below:

http://www.newwinnipeg.com/community/discussion/1167/cat-boardingkennel-in-winnipeg/

honeybunch
April 14th 07, 03:08 AM
If you wanted to, you could shave the cats and dress them as babies.
You say the cats sleep all the time so who would know? I suppose the
housemaids come into the room at certain times so just be sure you and
"the babies" are out of the room at those times. You could drive
around with them in the car several hours each day while the
housemaids clean the rooms. The trick will be getting them past the
concierge while dressed as babies. Perhaps you could bring a friend
to carry one and you could carry the other while your husband engaged
the concierge in a distracting conversation.

On Apr 13, 2:41 pm, "Shaynelle" > wrote:
> We have two 17 yr old cats and we are getting our hardwood floors
> refinished next week. We humans have to move into a hotel for about
> 3-5 days but we don't know what to do with our cats. The hotel doesn't
> take animals, and we can't stay in another hotel due to expense (its a
> military hotel and 1/4 the price of other hotels). It breaks my
> heart to stick them in a kennel where they will be stressed the whole
> time in the unfamiliar environment.
>
> I don't want to keep them in the home, although we have considered
> (since only the main floor is being redone) keeping them in our room
> with all the windows open and a damp towel outside the bedroom door to
> keep out the fumes. Since they are older they tend to sleep all day
> on our bed anyway, so I know they will be more comfortable and less
> stressed here than in a kennel. But I still am worried about the
> fumes. I can't think of what on earth to do.
>
> We would be visiting them twice a day in the house to feed them as
> they eat a RAW diet and so we could cuddle with them and keep an eye
> on the fumes in case they are stronger than expected in the bedroom.
>
> Any advice or other suggestions?
>
> Shaynelle

bookie
April 14th 07, 02:00 PM
On 13 Apr, 23:49, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "Shaynelle" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > Wow, I have never received such a rude reply when asking for advice.
> > Why would you be so rude to someone asking for advice?
>
> There was nothing at all rude about my reply. I was simply direct.
>
>
>
> > I am not in the US by the way, so hotels are not anywhere near what
> > you state, and you assume we are paying for the floors to be done then
> > verbally express anger about it. Not a very productive reply to
> > someone who was simply asking for advice. I hope others will not be
> > so rude in their replies :(
>
> What can anyone tell you except to board them or relent and pay
> for a hotel that will let you keep them with you?
>
> Do you imagine anyone will tell you to leave them in the house
> where the fumes may very well make them very sick? Their
> noses are a lot more sensitive than ours.
>
> I think you need to learn the difference between someone telling
> you a simple truth you just don't want to hear, and someone
> being rude.
>
> If someone else is paying to refinish your floors, them you are
> likely renting or the army is paying for it. If so, they should pay
> for a place for you to stay that includes pets, or for the boarding.
>
> If not, cough it up. Spend the money making sure your cats are
> happy and safe, and for heaven's sake don't leave them in the
> place with dangerous fumes and workers who may or may not
> let them out.

i agree, either board the cats or pay for a hotel who will let you
take them with you, you cannot leave them inthe house that is too
toxic for you to stay in, that would be killing them and if you were
in this country i would get the RSPCA out ontyour ass immediately

and if you are going to ask for advice form the group you have to
learn to be a little less sensitive to reponses, believe me when I say
cybercat's answer was nothing compared to what some others may have
posted (me included)

bookie

April 14th 07, 02:57 PM
"cybercat" > wrote:

>Do you imagine anyone will tell you to leave them in the house
>where the fumes may very well make them very sick? Their
>noses are a lot more sensitive than ours.

Also I would like to add you usually refinish hardwood floors with a
sander if they are damaged causing some very stressful noises for the
cats The cats will not be snoozing through this.

Annie Wxill
April 14th 07, 08:09 PM
"Shaynelle" > wrote in message
ups.com...
....
> Has anyone else had to put their older cats in a kennel? How did the
> cats react - were they really stressed out?

Hi Shaynelle,
Whatever you do, they will have to make some sort of adjustment. How
stressful this is would depend on the individual cat. You'll probably find
they can be more resilient than you expect.

I think that boarding them would be less stressful and less likely to affect
their health than leaving them shut up at home where they will be exposed to
harmful fumes and the sounds of strangers working with loud equipment on the
other side of the door.

The best thing, of course, would be to keep them with you, but you say that
you are not able to do this.

I wish you well on finding a boarding place where they will feel the most
comfortable.

Annie

honeybunch
April 15th 07, 11:45 PM
I know you are concerned with hiding the kittys from the management of
the hotel in cose you decide to keep them in the hotel room with you
which you would like to do. I wonder if there is a Craig's List for
Winipeg? If there is perhaps you could find a mother who might like
you to care for her babies for a few days. Then you could make a
false bottom in their baby carriage to keep your kittys in so you
could conceal their presense from the hotel management.


On Apr 14, 3:09 pm, "Annie Wxill" > wrote:
> "Shaynelle" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
> ...
>
> > Has anyone else had to put their older cats in a kennel? How did the
> > cats react - were they really stressed out?
>
> Hi Shaynelle,
> Whatever you do, they will have to make some sort of adjustment. How
> stressful this is would depend on the individual cat. You'll probably find
> they can be more resilient than you expect.
>
> I think that boarding them would be less stressful and less likely to affect
> their health than leaving them shut up at home where they will be exposed to
> harmful fumes and the sounds of strangers working with loud equipment on the
> other side of the door.
>
> The best thing, of course, would be to keep them with you, but you say that
> you are not able to do this.
>
> I wish you well on finding a boarding place where they will feel the most
> comfortable.
>
> Annie

Lynne
April 16th 07, 12:13 AM
on Sun, 15 Apr 2007 22:45:18 GMT, "honeybunch" > wrote:

> I know you are concerned with hiding the kittys from the management of
> the hotel in cose you decide to keep them in the hotel room with you
> which you would like to do. I wonder if there is a Craig's List for
> Winipeg? If there is perhaps you could find a mother who might like
> you to care for her babies for a few days. Then you could make a
> false bottom in their baby carriage to keep your kittys in so you
> could conceal their presense from the hotel management.

And what happens when a person who is highly allergic to cats stays in that
room afterward? What if that person has life threatening asthmatic
reactions to cat dander? Such a person would not stay in a hotel where
animals are allowed and shouldn't have to worry about people who break
rules in a hotel that does not.

Sheese, that advice is irresponsible, and not just because of the above
possible scenario.

--
Lynne

honeybunch
April 16th 07, 01:26 AM
I did suggest that she shave the kittys first and that would prevent
the dander from accumulating in the hotel room. She does seem
desparate to have her elderly cats with her for the five days it takes
for her hardwood floors to be refinished in Winnipeg and she's afraid
they would die without her if she left them in a cat resort because
they are so elderly. That's why she wrote in the first place.

On Apr 15, 7:13 pm, Lynne > wrote:
> on Sun, 15 Apr 2007 22:45:18 GMT, "honeybunch" > wrote:
>
> > I know you are concerned with hiding the kittys from the management of
> > the hotel in cose you decide to keep them in the hotel room with you
> > which you would like to do. I wonder if there is a Craig's List for
> > Winipeg? If there is perhaps you could find a mother who might like
> > you to care for her babies for a few days. Then you could make a
> > false bottom in their baby carriage to keep your kittys in so you
> > could conceal their presense from the hotel management.
>
> And what happens when a person who is highly allergic to cats stays in that
> room afterward? What if that person has life threatening asthmatic
> reactions to cat dander? Such a person would not stay in a hotel where
> animals are allowed and shouldn't have to worry about people who break
> rules in a hotel that does not.
>
> Sheese, that advice is irresponsible, and not just because of the above
> possible scenario.
>
> --
> Lynne

cybercat
April 16th 07, 01:38 AM
"honeybunch" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I did suggest that she shave the kittys first

What a steaming pile of horse ****. Cats have really thin, delicate skin,
and their skin,
like our skin, gets even thinner when they are older. This is not something
you do
lightly.

So "Shaynelle" has NO friends who she could trust to keep her cats, no
relatives, no other army wives? And she really cannot afford to stay in
a pet-friendly hotel? BULL****. She's being a cheap asshole.

My money is on "Shaynelle" coming up with a few hundred dollars
for anything but the cats. She doesn't want to board them mostly
because it will cost money. Otherwise, why the **** would she want
to leave the cats ALONE in the house where the fumes will make
them sick and the noises of the sanders and strangers will terrify
them?

You both need to **** off. Assholes.

Lynne
April 16th 07, 02:00 AM
on Mon, 16 Apr 2007 00:26:02 GMT, "honeybunch" > wrote:

> I did suggest that she shave the kittys first and that would prevent
> the dander from accumulating in the hotel room.

I somehow missed that.

Do you know anything about cats? If so, you would know what an
outrageously foolish suggestion that is.

Are you trolling or are you serious? Either way, please stop.

--
Lynne

J&T
April 16th 07, 03:25 AM
Not rude ? OMG what planet are you living on..

I cant believe how many anal and self righteous knobs are in this group...

She simply asks for advice as she obviously wasnt sure about the fumes being
dangerous to the cats, so she does the right think and asks ! And all you
anal ****wits jump all over her for her trouble.

You would prefer she didnt ask ?

Bunch of ******s here..

UNSUBSCRIBED and thankful for it.



"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Shaynelle" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> Wow, I have never received such a rude reply when asking for advice.
>> Why would you be so rude to someone asking for advice?
>
> There was nothing at all rude about my reply. I was simply direct.
>
>>
>> I am not in the US by the way, so hotels are not anywhere near what
>> you state, and you assume we are paying for the floors to be done then
>> verbally express anger about it. Not a very productive reply to
>> someone who was simply asking for advice. I hope others will not be
>> so rude in their replies :(
>>
>
> What can anyone tell you except to board them or relent and pay
> for a hotel that will let you keep them with you?
>
> Do you imagine anyone will tell you to leave them in the house
> where the fumes may very well make them very sick? Their
> noses are a lot more sensitive than ours.
>
> I think you need to learn the difference between someone telling
> you a simple truth you just don't want to hear, and someone
> being rude.
>
> If someone else is paying to refinish your floors, them you are
> likely renting or the army is paying for it. If so, they should pay
> for a place for you to stay that includes pets, or for the boarding.
>
> If not, cough it up. Spend the money making sure your cats are
> happy and safe, and for heaven's sake don't leave them in the
> place with dangerous fumes and workers who may or may not
> let them out.
>
>
>

Matthew
April 16th 07, 03:38 AM
"J&T" >

Don't let the doorknob hit you where the good lord split ya'

Barry
April 16th 07, 04:50 AM
On Apr 15, 10:38 pm, "Matthew" > wrote:
> "J&T" >
>
> Don't let the doorknob hit you where the good lord split ya'

a little southern hospitality

April 16th 07, 02:55 PM
How immature, she was simply asking for advice. I agree with the
previous reply that said they would rather have someone ask rather
than simply do something when they are not sure.

If I were having my floors redone I would board the cats, even if you
are concerned it would be more stressful for them. I understand your
concern over stressing the cats too much by having them board in a
strange place, but that is better than the stress they would get from
the fumes of the strong products used to refinish flooring.

My father has a flooring business and I worked for him for a number of
summers while in university. I know of a few people who have kept
their cats at home while the floors were being redone, but both times
it was in a well ventilated sunroom (or similar room) with exterior
doors in between the room and the main house. In that case I believe
it was fine, but keeping the cats in the main house I would not advise
as the fumes are quite strong, most likely stronger than you think
they will be.

Good luck and feel free to email me if you have any more questions.

Rick

Barry
April 16th 07, 03:58 PM
On Apr 16, 9:55 am, wrote:
> How immature, she was simply asking for advice. I agree with the
> previous reply that said they would rather have someone ask rather
> than simply do something when they are not sure.
>
> If I were having my floors redone I would board the cats, even if you
> are concerned it would be more stressful for them. I understand your
> concern over stressing the cats too much by having them board in a
> strange place, but that is better than the stress they would get from
> the fumes of the strong products used to refinish flooring.
>
> My father has a flooring business and I worked for him for a number of
> summers while in university. I know of a few people who have kept
> their cats at home while the floors were being redone, but both times
> it was in a well ventilated sunroom (or similar room) with exterior
> doors in between the room and the main house. In that case I believe
> it was fine, but keeping the cats in the main house I would not advise
> as the fumes are quite strong, most likely stronger than you think
> they will be.
>
> Good luck and feel free to email me if you have any more questions.
>
> Rick

you're the type of person who would shoot the messenger

LOL