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View Full Version : Cats Are Very Shy Toileters


April 16th 07, 12:25 PM
Cats in general are very shy toileters and will often only pee or poop
in their litter box if it is placed in a quiet, secluded area, away
from family members and other animals. The importance of your cat
toileting regularly cannot be over-emphasized. Too often owners do not
provide their cats with private & clean litter boxes, an unlimited
supply of water or access to the outdoors. Such a lifestyle quickly
leads to urinary tract disease which is very common in cats and often
very debilitating. In this disease, large crystals form in your cat's
bladder, which can then flow through your cat's urethra (the tube
linking the bladder to the outside world) and they often become lodged
and stuck! This obstruction of pee then causes a cat to become very
ill and very sore, at which time veterinary intervention is the only
option.
The key to preventing this problem is to encourage your cat to drink
more and to pee more! This helps prevent the formation of the crystals
in the bladder in the first place! Ensure that you have a couple of
full water bowls for your cat around the house as well as outside.
Your cat should have an unlimited supply of water. As for toileting,
you will need to encourage your cat to pee by ensuring privacy and
security when he does so. In general, there should be more than one
litter box in your household. In fact, the generally accepted formula
for the best number of litter boxes for your household is, one per cat
you own, plus one. So, if you have 2 cats, you should have 3 litter
boxes around the house, while if you only have one cat, have 2 litter
boxes - and so on. Just as important is that you use a good absorbable
litter that your cat likes and that you regularly replace this litter
once every 2 - 3 days (rather than once a week!). The cleaner the
litter, the more your cat will want to toilet on it. Then when placing
the litter boxes around the house, it is important to ensure that they
are in a secluded area away from a busy area of the house - however
make sure you don't leave a litter tray in a corner, or anywhere where
your cat may feel trapped while he is trying to toilet.
The key to avoiding your cat developing urinary tract problems and
toileting in inappropriate places, is to make the toileting experience
as stress free for your cat as possible. By providing unlimited water,
allowing some outdoors access and maintaining clean litter boxes in
private areas of your house you will be providing your cat with this
stress-free environment.
http://catsdby.blogspot.com/#

Noon Cat Nick
April 16th 07, 08:22 PM
So are people. That's why bathrooms have doors. (Well, mine does, anyway.)

this is all ab0ut y0ur pEts_n_
April 18th 07, 05:20 AM
Tell that to my cats. Got one cat litter box in my bedroom 2 in the
bathroom & one in the living room. They don't show no shyness at all

Bob
January 25th 08, 06:42 PM
My cat is the opposite. When I begin to clean her litter box she hops in and
does her business.

> wrote in message
ps.com...
> Cats in general are very shy toileters and will often only pee or poop
> in their litter box if it is placed in a quiet, secluded area, away
> from family members and other animals. The importance of your cat
> toileting regularly cannot be over-emphasized. Too often owners do not
> provide their cats with private & clean litter boxes, an unlimited
> supply of water or access to the outdoors. Such a lifestyle quickly
> leads to urinary tract disease which is very common in cats and often
> very debilitating. In this disease, large crystals form in your cat's
> bladder, which can then flow through your cat's urethra (the tube
> linking the bladder to the outside world) and they often become lodged
> and stuck! This obstruction of pee then causes a cat to become very
> ill and very sore, at which time veterinary intervention is the only
> option.
> The key to preventing this problem is to encourage your cat to drink
> more and to pee more! This helps prevent the formation of the crystals
> in the bladder in the first place! Ensure that you have a couple of
> full water bowls for your cat around the house as well as outside.
> Your cat should have an unlimited supply of water. As for toileting,
> you will need to encourage your cat to pee by ensuring privacy and
> security when he does so. In general, there should be more than one
> litter box in your household. In fact, the generally accepted formula
> for the best number of litter boxes for your household is, one per cat
> you own, plus one. So, if you have 2 cats, you should have 3 litter
> boxes around the house, while if you only have one cat, have 2 litter
> boxes - and so on. Just as important is that you use a good absorbable
> litter that your cat likes and that you regularly replace this litter
> once every 2 - 3 days (rather than once a week!). The cleaner the
> litter, the more your cat will want to toilet on it. Then when placing
> the litter boxes around the house, it is important to ensure that they
> are in a secluded area away from a busy area of the house - however
> make sure you don't leave a litter tray in a corner, or anywhere where
> your cat may feel trapped while he is trying to toilet.
> The key to avoiding your cat developing urinary tract problems and
> toileting in inappropriate places, is to make the toileting experience
> as stress free for your cat as possible. By providing unlimited water,
> allowing some outdoors access and maintaining clean litter boxes in
> private areas of your house you will be providing your cat with this
> stress-free environment.
> http://catsdby.blogspot.com/#
>