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CatNipped[_2_]
May 2nd 07, 02:02 PM
Contaminated Feed Could Affect Farms Nationwide

http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/05/01/recall.poultry/index.html

Exerpt:

"The protein products from China that are affected include: wheat gluten,
rice gluten, rice protein, rice protein concentrate, corn gluten, corn
gluten meal, corn byproducts, soy protein, soy gluten proteins, and mung
bean protein, the FDA import alert dated April 27 said."

Hugs,

CatNipped

sheelagh
May 2nd 07, 02:12 PM
On 2 May, 14:02, "CatNipped" > wrote:
> Contaminated Feed Could Affect Farms Nationwide
>
> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/05/01/recall.poultry/index.html
>
> Exerpt:
>
> "The protein products from China that are affected include: wheat gluten,
> rice gluten, rice protein, rice protein concentrate, corn gluten, corn
> gluten meal, corn byproducts, soy protein, soy gluten proteins, and mung
> bean protein, the FDA import alert dated April 27 said."
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped

Wow, I feel really sorry for you all over the pond. It must be really
worrying to have to think about every single thing that your pets
consume... Why are they so reluctant to tell you all what the state
of play is? Or, is it more of a question of what they didn't realise
themselves?
S;o)

cindys
May 2nd 07, 03:19 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On 2 May, 14:02, "CatNipped" > wrote:
>> Contaminated Feed Could Affect Farms Nationwide
>>
>> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/05/01/recall.poultry/index.html
>>
>> Exerpt:
>>
>> "The protein products from China that are affected include: wheat gluten,
>> rice gluten, rice protein, rice protein concentrate, corn gluten, corn
>> gluten meal, corn byproducts, soy protein, soy gluten proteins, and mung
>> bean protein, the FDA import alert dated April 27 said."
>>
>> Hugs,
>>
>> CatNipped
>
> Wow, I feel really sorry for you all over the pond. It must be really
> worrying to have to think about every single thing that your pets
> consume...
--------
It's not just about pets. It's about people too. Some farm animals have
apparently been eating tainted food, and the concern is that the
contaminants could enter the human food chain when these farm animals are
slaughtered and sold for meat.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.



>Why are they so reluctant to tell you all what the state
> of play is? Or, is it more of a question of what they didn't realise
> themselves?
> S;o)

Matthew
May 2nd 07, 03:23 PM
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
>
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> On 2 May, 14:02, "CatNipped" > wrote:
>>> Contaminated Feed Could Affect Farms Nationwide
>>>
>>> http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/05/01/recall.poultry/index.html
>>>
>>> Exerpt:
>>>
>>> "The protein products from China that are affected include: wheat
>>> gluten,
>>> rice gluten, rice protein, rice protein concentrate, corn gluten, corn
>>> gluten meal, corn byproducts, soy protein, soy gluten proteins, and mung
>>> bean protein, the FDA import alert dated April 27 said."
>>>
>>> Hugs,
>>>
>>> CatNipped
>>
>> Wow, I feel really sorry for you all over the pond. It must be really
>> worrying to have to think about every single thing that your pets
>> consume...
> --------
> It's not just about pets. It's about people too. Some farm animals have
> apparently been eating tainted food, and the concern is that the
> contaminants could enter the human food chain when these farm animals are
> slaughtered and sold for meat.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.
>
>
>
>>Why are they so reluctant to tell you all what the state
>> of play is? Or, is it more of a question of what they didn't realise
>> themselves?
>> S;o)
>
>
Again another reason I am going back to the farm if this keeps up

Lynne
May 2nd 07, 08:18 PM
on Wed, 02 May 2007 14:19:17 GMT, "cindys" >
wrote:

> It's not just about pets. It's about people too. Some farm animals
> have apparently been eating tainted food, and the concern is that the
> contaminants could enter the human food chain when these farm animals
> are slaughtered and sold for meat.

Not only that, I'm concerned about all foods with glutens; bread, crackers,
etc. I've taken to making my own bread again and am buying only organic
other food-stuffs. It's damn expensive, but I don't feel good about ANY
food right on the grocery store shelves now. I'm putting in a vegetable
garden this weekend. I may have to take up hunting!

--
Lynne


"We are strong enough to stand tall tearlessly
We are brave enough to bend to cry
And sad enough to know
We must laugh again"

~ Nikki Giovanni, 4/17/2007, Virginia Tech

chatnoir
May 2nd 07, 08:43 PM
On May 2, 8:19 am, "cindys" > wrote:
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> > On 2 May, 14:02, "CatNipped" > wrote:
> >> Contaminated Feed Could Affect Farms Nationwide
>
> >>http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/05/01/recall.poultry/index.html
>
> >> Exerpt:
>
> >> "The protein products from China that are affected include: wheat gluten,
> >> rice gluten, rice protein, rice protein concentrate, corn gluten, corn
> >> gluten meal, corn byproducts, soy protein, soy gluten proteins, and mung
> >> bean protein, the FDA import alert dated April 27 said."
>
> >> Hugs,
>
> >> CatNipped
>
> > Wow, I feel really sorry for you all over the pond. It must be really
> > worrying to have to think about every single thing that your pets
> > consume...
>
> --------
> It's not just about pets. It's about people too. Some farm animals have
> apparently been eating tainted food, and the concern is that the
> contaminants could enter the human food chain when these farm animals are
> slaughtered and sold for meat.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.

Well, interesting article here - sounds a lot like the stuff they put
in pet food also!:


http://tinyurl.com/2ztqyg


Beastly diets can be ghastly
Meat byproducts, additives common in feed at U.S. farms
11:01 PM CDT on Tuesday, May 1, 2007

>From Wire Reports
CHARLOTTE, N.C. - When officials announced last week that more than
6,000 hogs across the country may have inadvertently ingested an
industrial chemical through contaminated pet food, consumer advocates
weren't surprised.


FILE/The Associated Press
Cattle in Dodge City, Kan., eat a flaked corn mixture. The FDA limits
the proteins and additives that can be given to cattle, but some of
those still allowed include poultry manure, blood products, and pork
and horse meat byproducts.
For years, advocates have been trying to get the U.S. Food and Drug
Administration to ban the use of leftover pet food in hog and chicken
feed for fear it could spread mad cow disease because it contains
cattle parts.

Now some chickens and hogs are contaminated with a chemical blamed for
killing dogs and cats. That's prompted some consumers to wonder: What
exactly do hogs, cattle and chicken eat?

The answers aren't for the squeamish. The animals, which provide the
bulk of the meat eaten by Americans, consume a diet primarily
consisting of corn and grain supplemented with vitamins and minerals.

But additives like blood, manure and even unborn calf carcasses are
allowed under state or federal rules. Meat byproducts are also common;
those are the parts left over after pigs, cattle or other animals are
slaughtered and the meat is removed for human consumption. The
byproducts include the lungs, brain, spleen and internal organs along
with bone.

The typical livestock and poultry diet also includes antibiotics to
keep them healthy and hormones to speed up growth.

Opponents of feeding those drugs to animals say the supplements
wouldn't be needed if the animals weren't kept in cramped and filthy
environments. Concerns over the feeding and living conditions of
livestock and poultry have helped fuel the growth of organic farming,
which does not use meat byproducts and hormones in feed.

Still, most animals headed for slaughter are raised on nonorganic
farms. Below are examples of common livestock diets.

The information is from interviews with Lon Whitlow, professor of
dairy nutrition and animal science at North Carolina State University;
Ronnie Cummins, national director of the Organic Consumers
Association; and documents from the FDA and the Association of
American Feed Control Officials.

Hogs
The main diet is corn and soybean meal. Soybean meal is what's left
over after soybeans are processed for their oil. The animals' diet
also includes grains such as wheat, oats, barley or their byproducts.

Hogs also receive additives like blood and ground-up bone and meat
byproducts from a variety of animals for the protein and calcium
content. Feed can include the carcasses of unborn cattle, which are
taken from slaughtered cows. The product is produced by grinding whole
carcasses, exclusive of calf hides.

Misshapen and leftover pet food is frequently added. Animal manure and
leftover food and grease from restaurants are also sometimes included.

Cattle
The main diet for beef cattle is grass and hay. The diet also includes
some wheat, oat rye and proteins such as soybean meal and citrus pulp,
which is the material left over from making orange juice. Cattle also
are frequently fed corn gluten meal - a powder that's left over from
the making of corn meal - and dry brewer grains, which is left over
from the making of beer.

After a mad-cow disease scare in Europe a few years ago, the FDA
limited the types of proteins and additives that can be fed to cattle.
Pet food, for example, is not allowed because much of it contains beef
byproducts. Still allowable are poultry manure, blood and blood
products, grease, and pork and horse meat byproducts.

Food safety advocates generally object to feeding any meat products to
cattle, which normally eat only plants. Advocates have especially
railed against the use of poultry manure because much of what chickens
eat ends up on the floor, and those droppings are cooked and tossed
into cattle feed.

Because chickens are allowed to eat pet food that includes beef
byproducts, advocates worry about the potential of spreading mad cow
disease.

Chicken
The main diet is similar to that of hogs: mostly grains and grain
byproducts, seeds and canola and soybean meal.

They are also fed a variety of protein sources such as meat and bone
meal, which is essentially a flour made from animal fat and ground-up
animals. Chickens can also be fed pet food.

Nichole Monroe Bell, McClatchy Newspapers







>
> >Why are they so reluctant to tell you all what the state
> > of play is? Or, is it more of a question of what they didn't realise
> > themselves?
> > S;o)

Lilah Morgan
May 2nd 07, 09:01 PM
<<Not only that, I'm concerned about all foods with glutens; bread,
crackers, etc. I've taken to making my own bread again and am buying only
organic other food-stuffs. It's damn expensive, but I don't feel good about
ANY food right on the grocery store shelves now. I'm putting in a vegetable
garden this weekend. I may have to take up hunting!>>

I like making my own bread myself, just because I like punching dough :-)
Haven't as of yet though, because the house has to be in the 70s at least
for the dough to rise, and the house is usually around 60/65, and the
weather's been decent enough lately('cept for the past 2 days), to keep the
house warm, but not warm enough for dough. Which sucks because I have a
recipe for sourdough starter and I love sourdough. I've already started the
fruit/veggie garden(I always start it indoors in like March, so the stuff is
mature enough to withstand transplanting outdoors). As for hunting, well we
have quite a few chickens and bunnies if we wanted meat, 'cept mom...in her
own words "I can't eat anything I've seen alive!". Me, the way the roosters
start their noise at 3am sometimes, and the hens just start clucking up a
storm for no reason I can see, I'd have no problem :-) For like big game
hunting and crap, well my 'inner circle' seems to have an abject fear of me
and guns. I'd prefer a bow anyway(guns make too much noise and crap, and
they can go off accidentally and kill someone and crap). Bows don't have
that problem. You can accidentally shoot someone with them of course, but
you'd have to have an arrow ready to fire for that to happen. Plus guns make
too much noise(unless you buy a silencer), and arrows you can reuse if they
don't get too damaged. Can't reuse bullets once they've been fired. So
bow/arrows are more cost effective in the long run to boot :-)