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Adilah
May 13th 07, 03:37 PM
Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,

I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.

Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
"train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."

Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
"trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.

I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!

Cheers,

Adilah

Joe Canuck[_2_]
May 13th 07, 03:41 PM
Adilah wrote:
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah
>

Your partner is wrong.

Gail
May 13th 07, 03:55 PM
No, this will NOT work and will only make the cat afraid of your partner.
Vomiting is usually a symptom associated with a physical problem and cannot
be helped. You need to find the source of the problem.
Gail
"Adilah" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah
>

cindys
May 13th 07, 04:44 PM
"Adilah" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
--------
Rubbing an animal's nose in something (cat or dog of any age) is cruel and
useless. All it does is frighten the animal. You don't even do that when
you're housebreaking a puppy. And it's particularly cruel when it is being
perpetrated on an elderly animal (a 17-year-old cat is a senior citizen). If
your partner had an incontinent grandfather, would he rub grandpa's nose in
his underwear? If grandpa threw up in his bed, would your partner rub his
nose in it? Your cat is vomiting because he has a tummy ache or a furball or
is feeling ill. He is having litterbox accidents because he is OLD and can't
always make it to the bathroom (litterbox) in time. The situation is likely
to continue to deteriorate because Ozzie is getting older not younger, and
being cruel to him and scaring him is only going to make the situation
worse. Ozzie is going to continue to vomit on the couch and sometimes miss
the litter box. You should coddle and spoil Ozzie because he has been your
friend all these years and he is OLD and needs your understanding. Ask your
partner if he would like his nose rubbed in his vomit or urine when he gets
old and incontinent.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Noon Cat Nick
May 13th 07, 04:47 PM
Adilah wrote:

>Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
>I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
>have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
>Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
>Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
>just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
>"train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
>saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
>box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
>shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
>Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
>dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
>traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
>"trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
>nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
>and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
>I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
>this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
>

What your partner is doing is wholly ineffective, and also borders on
the abusive. Animals respond much better to positive reinforcement than
to negative. The only reazon Ozzie would ever stop vomiting on the sofa
is out of fear of your partner, which is bad. It might have worked for
him in the past, but not for the proper reasons.

You need to take Ozzie to the vet to find out the physical cause. And it
also sounds as if your partner could use some lessons in how to treat
companion animals...and perhaps some anger management therapy as well.

James
May 13th 07, 05:44 PM
Mine sometimes licks her vomit so it might not work.

Running Scissors
May 13th 07, 05:45 PM
Joe Canuck wrote:

> Adilah wrote:
>
>> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>>
>> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
>> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>>
>> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
>> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
>> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
>> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
>> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
>> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
>> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>>
>> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
>> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
>> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
>> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
>> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
>> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>>
>> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
>> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Adilah
>>
>
> Your partner is wrong.
Not to mention a little demented. Shoving a cat is abusive.

mlbriggs
May 13th 07, 06:35 PM
On Sun, 13 May 2007 07:37:01 -0700, Adilah wrote:

> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah


He sounds sadistic and rather stupid. Maybe you would get better results
if he rubbed his own nose in it. But he was probably treated that way
when he was a child. Does he ever read a book?

sheelagh
May 13th 07, 07:51 PM
On 13 May, 16:44, "cindys" > wrote:
> "Adilah" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
>
>
> > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> --------
> Rubbing an animal's nose in something (cat or dog of any age) is cruel and
> useless. All it does is frighten the animal. You don't even do that when
> you're housebreaking a puppy. And it's particularly cruel when it is being
> perpetrated on an elderly animal (a 17-year-old cat is a senior citizen). If
> your partner had an incontinent grandfather, would he rub grandpa's nose in
> his underwear? If grandpa threw up in his bed, would your partner rub his
> nose in it? Your cat is vomiting because he has a tummy ache or a furball or
> is feeling ill. He is having litterbox accidents because he is OLD and can't
> always make it to the bathroom (litterbox) in time. The situation is likely
> to continue to deteriorate because Ozzie is getting older not younger, and
> being cruel to him and scaring him is only going to make the situation
> worse. Ozzie is going to continue to vomit on the couch and sometimes miss
> the litter box. You should coddle and spoil Ozzie because he has been your
> friend all these years and he is OLD and needs your understanding. Ask your
> partner if he would like his nose rubbed in his vomit or urine when he gets
> old and incontinent.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I agree in full with this statement.
How sad.
Sheelagh

Patty
May 13th 07, 08:19 PM
On 13 May 2007 11:51:38 -0700, sheelagh wrote:

> On 13 May, 16:44, "cindys" > wrote:
>> "Adilah" > wrote in message
>>
>> ups.com...
>>
>>
>>
>>> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>>
>>> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
>>> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>>
>>> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
>>> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
>>> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
>>> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
>>> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
>>> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
>>> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>>
>>> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
>>> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
>>> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
>>> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
>>> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
>>> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>>
>>> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
>>> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>>
>> --------
>> Rubbing an animal's nose in something (cat or dog of any age) is cruel and
>> useless. All it does is frighten the animal. You don't even do that when
>> you're housebreaking a puppy. And it's particularly cruel when it is being
>> perpetrated on an elderly animal (a 17-year-old cat is a senior citizen). If
>> your partner had an incontinent grandfather, would he rub grandpa's nose in
>> his underwear? If grandpa threw up in his bed, would your partner rub his
>> nose in it? Your cat is vomiting because he has a tummy ache or a furball or
>> is feeling ill. He is having litterbox accidents because he is OLD and can't
>> always make it to the bathroom (litterbox) in time. The situation is likely
>> to continue to deteriorate because Ozzie is getting older not younger, and
>> being cruel to him and scaring him is only going to make the situation
>> worse. Ozzie is going to continue to vomit on the couch and sometimes miss
>> the litter box. You should coddle and spoil Ozzie because he has been your
>> friend all these years and he is OLD and needs your understanding. Ask your
>> partner if he would like his nose rubbed in his vomit or urine when he gets
>> old and incontinent.
>> Best regards,
>> ---Cindy S.- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> I agree in full with this statement.
> How sad.
> Sheelagh

I agree too. When my Grady was sick and vomiting, I would never have
dreamed of pushing his nose in it. I knew it wasn't his fault. And, when
he began not quite making it to the litter box, I never said anything, I
just cleaned it up. He was sick and I knew his days were limited and I
just spent all the time I could loving him in the short time that he had
left.

Patty

Adilah
May 14th 07, 12:57 AM
On May 13, 10:37 am, Adilah > wrote:
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah

Thank you to everyone who took the time to answer this question --
especially since you all seem to agree with me! I will show these
replies to my partner, and hopefully he will take them to heart -- he
is a very kind person, and he adores Ozzie (though not as much as I
do!!), but he is somewhat misguided about certain aspects of feline
behavior.

BTW, even though Ozzie is an old kitty, he has only been with us for
about 3 years. He was with his first owner for about 8 years, but
that owner travelled for work and left him alone too often, so Ozzie
ended up going to an eldery neighbor who doted on him. Unfortunately
the elderly neighbor -- my partner's friend's aunt -- went into a
nursing home 3 years ago, and my partner took in the kitty. Ozzie is
the most wonderful kitty I have ever known (and I am a veteran kitty-
whore!): he is sweet, friendly, very vocal, and still in good physical
shape despite his age. In fact, he is sitting in my lap, purring
away, as I type this.

Again, thank you to everyone who contributed to this thread.
Hopefully I can use your input to disabuse my partner of the notion
that he can "train" our kitty not to vomit in certain places!

Cheers,

Adilah

Spot
May 14th 07, 01:52 AM
If the behavior from your partner continues find the cat another home
someplace where he will be treated with respect. I personally would kick
the SOB out if I lived with him.

Celeste

"Adilah" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On May 13, 10:37 am, Adilah > wrote:
>> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>>
>> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
>> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>>
>> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
>> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
>> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
>> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
>> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
>> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
>> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>>
>> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
>> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
>> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
>> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
>> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
>> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>>
>> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
>> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>>
>> Cheers,
>>
>> Adilah
>
> Thank you to everyone who took the time to answer this question --
> especially since you all seem to agree with me! I will show these
> replies to my partner, and hopefully he will take them to heart -- he
> is a very kind person, and he adores Ozzie (though not as much as I
> do!!), but he is somewhat misguided about certain aspects of feline
> behavior.
>
> BTW, even though Ozzie is an old kitty, he has only been with us for
> about 3 years. He was with his first owner for about 8 years, but
> that owner travelled for work and left him alone too often, so Ozzie
> ended up going to an eldery neighbor who doted on him. Unfortunately
> the elderly neighbor -- my partner's friend's aunt -- went into a
> nursing home 3 years ago, and my partner took in the kitty. Ozzie is
> the most wonderful kitty I have ever known (and I am a veteran kitty-
> whore!): he is sweet, friendly, very vocal, and still in good physical
> shape despite his age. In fact, he is sitting in my lap, purring
> away, as I type this.
>
> Again, thank you to everyone who contributed to this thread.
> Hopefully I can use your input to disabuse my partner of the notion
> that he can "train" our kitty not to vomit in certain places!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah
>

-L.
May 14th 07, 09:38 AM
Adilah wrote:
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."

He's an asshole. Never treat any animal this way, not a cat, not a
dog, not ANY animal. They don't understand and wuill resent you for
doing this. they can't control where they vomit.

Have your cat checked for renal failure. Frequent vomiiting is one of
the signs.

-L.

bookie
May 14th 07, 02:44 PM
On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah

your partner is a ****ing cretin, if i were you i would leave him and
find someone with some intelligence. How on earth does rubbing a cats
nose in it prevent said cat fro throing up when he feels ill? when you
need to puke you need to puke and have little or no control over when
or where it surfaces. the cat is not being malicious or nasty by
puking, it just has to sometimes if it is not feelign well or there is
an obstruction or something, and rubbing the cats nose in it's puke is
cruel, vicious nasty and evil, and will have no effect on the cats
behaviour except to make it more frightened and nervous and probably
avoid your partner (not such a bad thing if your partner is such a
vicious ****, i woudl keep my distance too).

where did he get his ideas from? woudl he liek it if someone rubbed
his nose in his puke when he ill/ woudl that make him better? what
about when he is old and incontinent? will rubbing his nose in his
soiled bedsheets suddenly make his bladder control better so he won't
do ti anymore? your cat is very old and she/he will tend to have more
'accidents' now, not cos they want to, buut because in human years
they are about 70+years old now and probably have less control over
their functions they they did before and so leaks and things will
occur more often now. Could you imagine him doing similar to your
grandma or mother when they are in their old age? NO! because you know
that they are not doing it deliberately, but because they can't ehpl
themselevs, so how distressin for them would it be to have their noses
rubbed in it?

not only that but you say your cat is 17, has this ****** not heard
the term "can't teach and old dog new tricks?"

the man is not just stupid but downright nasty too, what are you doing
letting him anywhere near your cat in the first place with deranged
ideas like this? the man is a cretin and if you love your cat at all
you MUST stop this ****** from continuing this nasty and spiteful
behaviour NOW

shaking my head in utter disbelief,
bookie

bookie
May 14th 07, 02:47 PM
On 14 May, 01:52, "Spot" > wrote:
> If the behavior from your partner continues find the cat another home
> someplace where he will be treated with respect. I personally would kick
> the SOB out if I lived with him.
>
> Celeste
>
> "Adilah" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
>
>
> > On May 13, 10:37 am, Adilah > wrote:
> >> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> >> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> >> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> >> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> >> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> >> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> >> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> >> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> >> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> >> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> >> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> >> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> >> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> >> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> >> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> >> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> >> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> >> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> >> Cheers,
>
> >> Adilah
>
> > Thank you to everyone who took the time to answer this question --
> > especially since you all seem to agree with me! I will show these
> > replies to my partner, and hopefully he will take them to heart -- he
> > is a very kind person, and he adores Ozzie (though not as much as I
> > do!!), but he is somewhat misguided about certain aspects of feline
> > behavior.
>
> > BTW, even though Ozzie is an old kitty, he has only been with us for
> > about 3 years. He was with his first owner for about 8 years, but
> > that owner travelled for work and left him alone too often, so Ozzie
> > ended up going to an eldery neighbor who doted on him. Unfortunately
> > the elderly neighbor -- my partner's friend's aunt -- went into a
> > nursing home 3 years ago, and my partner took in the kitty. Ozzie is
> > the most wonderful kitty I have ever known (and I am a veteran kitty-
> > whore!): he is sweet, friendly, very vocal, and still in good physical
> > shape despite his age. In fact, he is sitting in my lap, purring
> > away, as I type this.
>
> > Again, thank you to everyone who contributed to this thread.
> > Hopefully I can use your input to disabuse my partner of the notion
> > that he can "train" our kitty not to vomit in certain places!
>
> > Cheers,
>
> > Adilah- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

i agree too, it woudl be better for poor ozzie to live with someone
who treated him with respect and understood that he is gettig old and
needs to have care not punishment for all those things which happen
when you get old

i feel so sorry for ozzie, please think about finding him another home
if your retarded partner can;t stop being so cruel and abusive

bookie
May 14th 07, 02:50 PM
On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah

also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now

well, ok,. not just that, i am also thinking about what it might be
like to shove a certain person's nose in a big pile of their own poo
and vomit to see who he likes it actually, ooooooh I would really like
to do that now

May 14th 07, 05:51 PM
On 14 May, 14:44, bookie > wrote:
> On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > Cheers,
>
> > Adilah
>
> your partner is a ****ing cretin, if i were you i would leave him and
> find someone with some intelligence. How on earth does rubbing a cats
> nose in it prevent said cat fro throing up when he feels ill? when you
> need to puke you need to puke and have little or no control over when
> or where it surfaces. the cat is not being malicious or nasty by
> puking, it just has to sometimes if it is not feelign well or there is
> an obstruction or something, and rubbing the cats nose in it's puke is
> cruel, vicious nasty and evil, and will have no effect on the cats
> behaviour except to make it more frightened and nervous and probably
> avoid your partner (not such a bad thing if your partner is such a
> vicious ****, i woudl keep my distance too).
>
> where did he get his ideas from? woudl he liek it if someone rubbed
> his nose in his puke when he ill/ woudl that make him better? what
> about when he is old and incontinent? will rubbing his nose in his
> soiled bedsheets suddenly make his bladder control better so he won't
> do ti anymore? your cat is very old and she/he will tend to have more
> 'accidents' now, not cos they want to, buut because in human years
> they are about 70+years old now and probably have less control over
> their functions they they did before and so leaks and things will
> occur more often now. Could you imagine him doing similar to your
> grandma or mother when they are in their old age? NO! because you know
> that they are not doing it deliberately, but because they can't ehpl
> themselevs, so how distressin for them would it be to have their noses
> rubbed in it?
>
> not only that but you say your cat is 17, has this ****** not heard
> the term "can't teach and old dog new tricks?"
>
> the man is not just stupid but downright nasty too, what are you doing
> letting him anywhere near your cat in the first place with deranged
> ideas like this? the man is a cretin and if you love your cat at all
> you MUST stop this ****** from continuing this nasty and spiteful
> behaviour NOW
>
> shaking my head in utter disbelief,
> bookie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I couldn't agree more with you if I tried. It is not border line
abuse, it is Abuse, full stop!
If the authorities had any idea that this was transpiring, they would
remove custodial ownership to somewhere that the cat would no longer
be abused in this manner, & would be free from the bullying that the
poor cat has no chance to escape from.

In fact, I would go further. By not reporting what has happened to
your cat, makes you just as liable for his actions as he is. You have
had every opportunity to ensure that your cat was not subjected to
this abuse, & if you lived in the UK, you would be prosecuted too & be
banned from animal ownership for life, which is about the right thing
that you would deserve for allowing it to continue.

Do not look for sympathy or support for what you have told us, because
you do not deserve it. It makes me angry to think that you might look
or find support with a group who's first interest is to the cat, not
the owner, or the abuser. In our country, if you stand by and watch
this abuse happen, you are as guilty as the offender.

I am disgusted that you thought you would find it here,& even more
disillusioned that you felt people were supporting you rather than
your partner.

The best thing that you could do for this cat is to take it to a no
kill policy shelter & allow a family who will care for him in a
respectable loving manner where he will be appreciated & enjoy his
twilight years in safety & peace. You are doing him no favours at all,
merely looking for sympathy here, & support to throw at your
boyfriend...Not to help the cat in anyway at all. If you did care
about this cat, you would be posting about the terrible boyfriend that
you saved your cat from!

I very much hope that you take these words to heart and do the right
thing regarding the cat in your care
K.

Matthew
May 14th 07, 06:39 PM
"Adilah" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah
>

The rubbing nose is not only a stupid way but a ignorant way all you do is
make the animal fear you and tell the animal that this is a good spot to use

Use common sense you know your partner is a idiot. When your "partner" does
this grab them by the back of the neck shove their face into it and say
don't do it again. What would happen?

If I saw your mate doing this in my presence not only would I call the law
for animal abuse but my 12 inch boot would go where the sun don't shine

IMO take you mate by the back of the neck and drop kick it out the door
telling them don't let the door knob hit you where the good lord split ya'

May 14th 07, 07:09 PM
On 14 May, 18:39, "Matthew" > wrote:
> "Adilah" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > Cheers,
>
> > Adilah
>
> The rubbing nose is not only a stupid way but a ignorant way all you do is
> make the animal fear you and tell the animal that this is a good spot to use
>
> Use common sense you know your partner is a idiot. When your "partner" does
> this grab them by the back of the neck shove their face into it and say
> don't do it again. What would happen?
>
> If I saw your mate doing this in my presence not only would I call the law
> for animal abuse but my 12 inch boot would go where the sun don't shine
>
> IMO take you mate by the back of the neck and drop kick it out the door
> telling them don't let the door knob hit you where the good lord split ya'- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I can't believe that any one would do any other than as you suggest.
This is repulsive & as far as I am concerned Must be a troll posting,
surely?
K.

Adilah
May 14th 07, 10:33 PM
On May 14, 9:50 am, bookie > wrote:
> On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>

> > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > Cheers,
>
> > Adilah
>
> also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
> to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
> distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now

(snip)

No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
elsewhere.

However, I do appreciate the few of you who gave thoughtful replies to
my original post, instead of attacking my partner and me. Many thanks
to those mature adults who replied to my post with logic instead of
viciousness -- I now feel much more confident in confronting my
partner about his obviously misguided "training methods" for Ozzie.

To the rest of you, I hope your real-life interpersonal skills are
better than what you demonstrate on Usenet (where, unfortunately,
every asshole has a soapbox). I'm glad you have your kitties, because
I suspect that many of you have few or no human friends.

Thank you again to the "grownups" on this group. Ozzie is sitting on
my lap (with his neck stretched across my arm as I type on my laptop)
and he sends you his fondest purrs.

Adilah

Joe Canuck[_2_]
May 14th 07, 11:08 PM
Adilah wrote:
> On May 14, 9:50 am, bookie > wrote:
>> On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>>
>
>>> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>>> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
>>> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>>> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
>>> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
>>> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
>>> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
>>> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
>>> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
>>> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>>> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
>>> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
>>> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
>>> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
>>> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
>>> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>>> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
>>> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>>> Cheers,
>>> Adilah
>> also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
>> to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
>> distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now
>
> (snip)
>
> No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
> too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
> this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
> elsewhere.
>
> However, I do appreciate the few of you who gave thoughtful replies to
> my original post, instead of attacking my partner and me. Many thanks
> to those mature adults who replied to my post with logic instead of
> viciousness -- I now feel much more confident in confronting my
> partner about his obviously misguided "training methods" for Ozzie.
>
> To the rest of you, I hope your real-life interpersonal skills are
> better than what you demonstrate on Usenet (where, unfortunately,
> every asshole has a soapbox). I'm glad you have your kitties, because
> I suspect that many of you have few or no human friends.
>
> Thank you again to the "grownups" on this group. Ozzie is sitting on
> my lap (with his neck stretched across my arm as I type on my laptop)
> and he sends you his fondest purrs.
>
> Adilah
>

Ignore those who attack.

Your heart is certainly in the right place with respect to your cat.

The group is not bad if you can get past the idiots.

Matthew
May 15th 07, 12:42 AM
"Adilah" >


Welcome to the internet when you post what you post be ready for the good
and the bad. And when you post about bad be ready for people to react. You
talk about abuse being done to your cat and you are basically standing by
be ready for people to show you their teeth.

Don't let the door knob hit you where the good lord split ya' if you don't
like what people have to say.

MaryL
May 15th 07, 01:21 AM
"Adilah" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> Cheers,
>
> Adilah
>

This is abusive and *will not work* (for either cats or dogs) and this
includes both vomiting and litterbox habits. Your cat will not have any
idea why this is being done to him. It will simply teach him to fear and
dislike people.

You need to do two things: (1) Get rid of that roommate!!! (2) Take Ozzie
to a vet for a checkup ASAP unless you are simply talking about the
occasional hairball. If these are normal hairball episodes, you *cannot*
train a cat to seek an "appropriate" location. That won't make any sense to
the cat, and poor Ozzie is being traumatized.

MaryL

bookie
May 15th 07, 01:46 AM
On 14 May, 22:33, Adilah > wrote:
> On May 14, 9:50 am, bookie > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>
> > > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > > Cheers,
>
> > > Adilah
>
> > also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
> > to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
> > distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now
>
> (snip)
>
> No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
> too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
> this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
> elsewhere.
>
> However, I do appreciate the few of you who gave thoughtful replies to
> my original post, instead of attacking my partner and me. Many thanks
> to those mature adults who replied to my post with logic instead of
> viciousness -- I now feel much more confident in confronting my
> partner about his obviously misguided "training methods" for Ozzie.
>
> To the rest of you, I hope your real-life interpersonal skills are
> better than what you demonstrate on Usenet (where, unfortunately,
> every asshole has a soapbox). I'm glad you have your kitties, because
> I suspect that many of you have few or no human friends.
>
> Thank you again to the "grownups" on this group. Ozzie is sitting on
> my lap (with his neck stretched across my arm as I type on my laptop)
> and he sends you his fondest purrs.
>
> Adilah- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

what the hell did you expect? some of us are quite understandably
shocked by your partner's behaviour and are rightly expressing so,
what else do you expect us to do? if you were msall child then
perhaps you woudl have got a different response (ie a bit calmer) but
the thing i sthat we all assume that you are an intelligent adult and
it shocks us and amaze us that you have allowed this to happen to your
cat in the first place, and for some of us it makes us downright angry
I am not going to apologise for my feelings on the matter or for
expressing those feelings either, I really can't believe you thought
you woudl get sympathy from anyone for allowing this abuse to
continue, i am astounded that you you might.
what next? "my husband keeping trying to rape our teenage daughters,
do you think this is right? i am not sure whether his behaviour is
acceptable, please advise"!!!!!!! to me yuor question was on a similar
level, and if you were presented with the above question you would
also respond in a similar way to how some of us have done to your
post, ie with disbelief, indignation and outrage.

deal with it
bookie

bookie
May 15th 07, 01:48 AM
On 14 May, 19:09, wrote:
> On 14 May, 18:39, "Matthew" > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > "Adilah" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
> > > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > > Cheers,
>
> > > Adilah
>
> > The rubbing nose is not only a stupid way but a ignorant way all you do is
> > make the animal fear you and tell the animal that this is a good spot to use
>
> > Use common sense you know your partner is a idiot. When your "partner" does
> > this grab them by the back of the neck shove their face into it and say
> > don't do it again. What would happen?
>
> > If I saw your mate doing this in my presence not only would I call the law
> > for animal abuse but my 12 inch boot would go where the sun don't shine
>
> > IMO take you mate by the back of the neck and drop kick it out the door
> > telling them don't let the door knob hit you where the good lord split ya'- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> I can't believe that any one would do any other than as you suggest.
> This is repulsive & as far as I am concerned Must be a troll posting,
> surely?
> K.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

i bloody well hope so, this really disgusts and i don't want to
believe this goes on

sheelagh
May 15th 07, 02:36 PM
On 14 May, 22:33, Adilah > wrote:
> On May 14, 9:50 am, bookie > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>
> > > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > > Cheers,
>
> > > Adilah
>
> > also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
> > to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
> > distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now
>
> (snip)
>
> No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
> too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
> this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
> elsewhere.
>
> However, I do appreciate the few of you who gave thoughtful replies to
> my original post, instead of attacking my partner and me. Many thanks
> to those mature adults who replied to my post with logic instead of
> viciousness -- I now feel much more confident in confronting my
> partner about his obviously misguided "training methods" for Ozzie.
>
> To the rest of you, I hope your real-life interpersonal skills are
> better than what you demonstrate on Usenet (where, unfortunately,
> every asshole has a soapbox). I'm glad you have your kitties, because
> I suspect that many of you have few or no human friends.
>
> Thank you again to the "grownups" on this group. Ozzie is sitting on
> my lap (with his neck stretched across my arm as I type on my laptop)
> and he sends you his fondest purrs.
>
> Adilah- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Pity, it would have good to know that you had in fact taken this
advice to heart. . I don't think that one single person here feels
that they are trying to make you feel bad, they are merely thinking
aloud. I can't believe that you were looking for comments to simply
through @ your partner in a point scoring exercise to make him see
that he is a bad boy.
This poor cat is a pensioner in age, & all that he wants is somewhere
to finish the rest of his years in peace & company. If you feel that
your partner is going too far, then take appropriate action & take
Ozzie to the vet first to make sure that there is nothing medically
wrong that is causing him to vomit, then come back & let us know what
the vet had to say. I can assure you that there would be a lot of
people here that would eat their words if you felt that you could do
this for your cat. Secondly, either the partner goes, or you go with
your cat, If you love him the way you say that you do.

I know that you feel that everyone is blaming you for what your
partner is inflicting upon your cat, but it is your job to ensure that
he is not allowed to do this because it is cruel, inappropriate &
Frightening for Ozzy too. He has no idea why his face is being stuffed
into his vomit, only that he is frightened by it, & can't defend
himself.

I for one, hope that you DO all of the things I mention >"o"<
Think how good it would be to come back and prove every single one of
us wrong?!
S;o)

bookie
May 15th 07, 11:23 PM
On 15 May, 14:36, sheelagh > wrote:
> On 14 May, 22:33, Adilah > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On May 14, 9:50 am, bookie > wrote:
>
> > > On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>
> > > > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > > > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > > > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > > > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > > > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > > > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > > > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > > > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > > > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > > > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > > > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > > > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > > > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > > > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > > > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > > > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > > > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > > > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > > > Cheers,
>
> > > > Adilah
>
> > > also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
> > > to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
> > > distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now
>
> > (snip)
>
> > No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
> > too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
> > this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
> > elsewhere.
>
> > However, I do appreciate the few of you who gave thoughtful replies to
> > my original post, instead of attacking my partner and me. Many thanks
> > to those mature adults who replied to my post with logic instead of
> > viciousness -- I now feel much more confident in confronting my
> > partner about his obviously misguided "training methods" for Ozzie.
>
> > To the rest of you, I hope your real-life interpersonal skills are
> > better than what you demonstrate on Usenet (where, unfortunately,
> > every asshole has a soapbox). I'm glad you have your kitties, because
> > I suspect that many of you have few or no human friends.
>
> > Thank you again to the "grownups" on this group. Ozzie is sitting on
> > my lap (with his neck stretched across my arm as I type on my laptop)
> > and he sends you his fondest purrs.
>
> > Adilah- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> Pity, it would have good to know that you had in fact taken this
> advice to heart. . I don't think that one single person here feels
> that they are trying to make you feel bad, they are merely thinking
> aloud. I can't believe that you were looking for comments to simply
> through @ your partner in a point scoring exercise to make him see
> that he is a bad boy.
> This poor cat is a pensioner in age, & all that he wants is somewhere
> to finish the rest of his years in peace & company. If you feel that
> your partner is going too far, then take appropriate action & take
> Ozzie to the vet first to make sure that there is nothing medically
> wrong that is causing him to vomit, then come back & let us know what
> the vet had to say. I can assure you that there would be a lot of
> people here that would eat their words if you felt that you could do
> this for your cat. Secondly, either the partner goes, or you go with
> your cat, If you love him the way you say that you do.
>
> I know that you feel that everyone is blaming you for what your
> partner is inflicting upon your cat, but it is your job to ensure that
> he is not allowed to do this because it is cruel, inappropriate &
> Frightening for Ozzy too. He has no idea why his face is being stuffed
> into his vomit, only that he is frightened by it, & can't defend
> himself.
>
> I for one, hope that you DO all of the things I mention >"o"<
> Think how good it would be to come back and prove every single one of
> us wrong?!
> S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

er sheelagh honey, none of us are saying that the OP is wrong or that
she will nto do the right thing now and take ozzie to the vet, we are
just outraged that she has let this happen at all in the first place

sorry just had to go over to jessie who is sat on a pile of dark
fleeces, sheddign load sof white fur all over them to make them look
better, and had to hug her lots, just felt so thankful that she is
here with me and not with some cretin who abuses her inthe way that
the OP's partner would do. i hate to think how distressed she would be
if someone treated her like that
bookie

K
May 16th 07, 11:06 AM
On 15 May, 23:23, bookie > wrote:
> On 15 May, 14:36, sheelagh > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 14 May, 22:33, Adilah > wrote:
>
> > > On May 14, 9:50 am, bookie > wrote:
>
> > > > On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>
> > > > > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > > > > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > > > > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > > > > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > > > > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > > > > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > > > > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > > > > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > > > > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > > > > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > > > > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > > > > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > > > > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > > > > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > > > > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > > > > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > > > > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > > > > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > > > > Cheers,
>
> > > > > Adilah
>
> > > > also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
> > > > to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
> > > > distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now
>
> > > (snip)
>
> > > No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
> > > too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
> > > this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
> > > elsewhere.
>
> > > However, I do appreciate the few of you who gave thoughtful replies to
> > > my original post, instead of attacking my partner and me. Many thanks
> > > to those mature adults who replied to my post with logic instead of
> > > viciousness -- I now feel much more confident in confronting my
> > > partner about his obviously misguided "training methods" for Ozzie.
>
> > > To the rest of you, I hope your real-life interpersonal skills are
> > > better than what you demonstrate on Usenet (where, unfortunately,
> > > every asshole has a soapbox). I'm glad you have your kitties, because
> > > I suspect that many of you have few or no human friends.
>
> > > Thank you again to the "grownups" on this group. Ozzie is sitting on
> > > my lap (with his neck stretched across my arm as I type on my laptop)
> > > and he sends you his fondest purrs.
>
> > > Adilah- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > - Show quoted text -
>
> > Pity, it would have good to know that you had in fact taken this
> > advice to heart. . I don't think that one single person here feels
> > that they are trying to make you feel bad, they are merely thinking
> > aloud. I can't believe that you were looking for comments to simply
> > through @ your partner in a point scoring exercise to make him see
> > that he is a bad boy.
> > This poor cat is a pensioner in age, & all that he wants is somewhere
> > to finish the rest of his years in peace & company. If you feel that
> > your partner is going too far, then take appropriate action & take
> > Ozzie to the vet first to make sure that there is nothing medically
> > wrong that is causing him to vomit, then come back & let us know what
> > the vet had to say. I can assure you that there would be a lot of
> > people here that would eat their words if you felt that you could do
> > this for your cat. Secondly, either the partner goes, or you go with
> > your cat, If you love him the way you say that you do.
>
> > I know that you feel that everyone is blaming you for what your
> > partner is inflicting upon your cat, but it is your job to ensure that
> > he is not allowed to do this because it is cruel, inappropriate &
> > Frightening for Ozzy too. He has no idea why his face is being stuffed
> > into his vomit, only that he is frightened by it, & can't defend
> > himself.
>
> > I for one, hope that you DO all of the things I mention >"o"<
> > Think how good it would be to come back and prove every single one of
> > us wrong?!
> > S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> er sheelagh honey, none of us are saying that the OP is wrong or that
> she will nto do the right thing now and take ozzie to the vet, we are
> just outraged that she has let this happen at all in the first place
>
> sorry just had to go over to jessie who is sat on a pile of dark
> fleeces, sheddign load sof white fur all over them to make them look
> better, and had to hug her lots, just felt so thankful that she is
> here with me and not with some cretin who abuses her inthe way that
> the OP's partner would do. i hate to think how distressed she would be
> if someone treated her like that
> bookie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -
I'm always wrong-no worries

sheelagh
May 16th 07, 07:55 PM
On 15 May, 23:23, bookie > wrote:
> On 15 May, 14:36, sheelagh > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 14 May, 22:33, Adilah > wrote:
>
> > > On May 14, 9:50 am, bookie > wrote:
>
> > > > On 13 May, 15:37, Adilah > wrote:
>
> > > > > Hello members of r.p.c.h+v,
>
> > > > > I am hoping you will help settle an argument that my partner and I
> > > > > have been having about our 17-year old Burmese.
>
> > > > > Ozzie, like just about every cat I have ever known, vomits sometimes.
> > > > > Usually on the floor, but occasionally on the new sofa. I usually
> > > > > just sigh and clean up the puke, but my partner seems to think he can
> > > > > "train" Ozzie not to vomit on the sofa by rubbing his nose in it and
> > > > > saying "NO" very loudly. He has also dealt with the occasional litter
> > > > > box accident by rubbing his nose in it, screaming "NO," and then
> > > > > shoving the cat into his litter box where he is "supposed to go."
>
> > > > > Now, I am aware that the "rubbing the nose in it" method is useful for
> > > > > dogs, but I feel that this is not only useless for cats, but is even
> > > > > traumatizing. My partner, however, claims that he has previously
> > > > > "trained" cats not to vomit on beds/sofas by doing the rubbing-the-
> > > > > nose-in-it thing. I get very angry at him when he does this to Ozzie,
> > > > > and he then accuses me of coddling and spoiling the cat.
>
> > > > > I would be very interested to hear the opinions of any cat lovers on
> > > > > this newsgroup. Thank you in advance for your replies!
>
> > > > > Cheers,
>
> > > > > Adilah
>
> > > > also, can you please write back and reassure us that this is not going
> > > > to happen again, i am worried now and can only think of the awful
> > > > distress and suffering poor ozzie is going through right now
>
> > > (snip)
>
> > > No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
> > > too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
> > > this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
> > > elsewhere.
>
> > > However, I do appreciate the few of you who gave thoughtful replies to
> > > my original post, instead of attacking my partner and me. Many thanks
> > > to those mature adults who replied to my post with logic instead of
> > > viciousness -- I now feel much more confident in confronting my
> > > partner about his obviously misguided "training methods" for Ozzie.
>
> > > To the rest of you, I hope your real-life interpersonal skills are
> > > better than what you demonstrate on Usenet (where, unfortunately,
> > > every asshole has a soapbox). I'm glad you have your kitties, because
> > > I suspect that many of you have few or no human friends.
>
> > > Thank you again to the "grownups" on this group. Ozzie is sitting on
> > > my lap (with his neck stretched across my arm as I type on my laptop)
> > > and he sends you his fondest purrs.
>
> > > Adilah- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > - Show quoted text -
>
> > Pity, it would have good to know that you had in fact taken this
> > advice to heart. . I don't think that one single person here feels
> > that they are trying to make you feel bad, they are merely thinking
> > aloud. I can't believe that you were looking for comments to simply
> > through @ your partner in a point scoring exercise to make him see
> > that he is a bad boy.
>
> > > No, I won't be writing back to "reassure" you. There seem to be way
> > > too many judgmental, overdramatic, and gratuitously nasty people on
> > > this newsgroup, and in the future I will be seeking cat-related advice
> > > elsewhere. first to make sure that there is nothing medically
> > wrong that is causing him to vomit, then come back & let us know what
> > the vet had to say. I can assure you that there would be a lot of
> > people here that would eat their words if you felt that you could do
> > this for your cat. Secondly, either the partner goes, or you go with
> > your cat, If you love him the way you say that you do.
>
> > I know that you feel that everyone is blaming you for what your
> > partner is inflicting upon your cat, but it is your job to ensure that
> > he is not allowed to do this because it is cruel, inappropriate &
> > Frightening for Ozzy too. He has no idea why his face is being stuffed
> > into his vomit, only that he is frightened by it, & can't defend
> > himself.
>
> > I for one, hope that you DO all of the things I mention >"o"<
> > Think how good it would be to come back and prove every single one of
> > us wrong?!
> > S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> er sheelagh honey, none of us are saying that the OP is wrong or that
> she will nto do the right thing now and take ozzie to the vet, we are
> just outraged that she has let this happen at all in the first place
>
> sorry just had to go over to jessie who is sat on a pile of dark
> fleeces, sheddign load sof white fur all over them to make them look
> better, and had to hug her lots, just felt so thankful that she is
> here with me and not with some cretin who abuses her inthe way that
> the OP's partner would do. i hate to think how distressed she would be
> if someone treated her like that
> bookie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

> er sheelagh honey, none of us are saying that the OP is wrong or that
> she will nto do the right thing now and take ozzie to the vet, we are
> just outraged that she has let this happen at all in the first place

I realised that Bookie. I was trying to get her to see that what she
has allowed to continue was wrong & that this would be the golden
opportunity to come back to us and let us know that she has done
something to address the issue... & show us that she was up to the
mark, & has changed either the partner or renamed the cat because the
partner was obviously more important to her.

Perhaps I am wrong....

I wanted her to "know" that what she has allowed to continue unabated
Is Wrong, & I wanted her to do something about it.....

So my point is: "I think she is wrong" here.....However, It is only
MHO.

However, I have been known to be wrong Occasionally, LOL!!

S;o)

PS: I hope that poor little Jessie did a brilliant job of making the
fleeces look "Much Better"?