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May 20th 07, 03:25 AM
I have a question for you cat experts out there. A young cat showed up
on my front porch; she was a sweet cat so I started feeding her my
indoor cat's leftovers and of course, she stayed. A couple of weeks
later she had a litter of 5 kittens in my yard in a truck tool box.
They are 8 weeks old now and costing me a bundle to feed. I need to
round them up to give them away, but I can't get near them. She hisses
when I try to come near her and has taught her kits to do the same.
They run whenever I open the front door. I have lined up a home for
them at my cousin Sally's but can't catch them. Any ideas on how to
trap them? I was wondering about putting the mom in a cat carrier and
seeing if the kittens will come to her to nurse, but they run away
when I open the door. thanks in advance,-Jitney

trobinson
May 20th 07, 04:54 AM
On May 20, 12:25 pm, wrote:
> I have a question for you cat experts out there. A young cat showed up
> on my front porch; she was a sweet cat so I started feeding her my
> indoor cat's leftovers and of course, she stayed. A couple of weeks
> later she had a litter of 5 kittens in my yard in a truck tool box.
> They are 8 weeks old now and costing me a bundle to feed. I need to
> round them up to give them away, but I can't get near them. She hisses
> when I try to come near her and has taught her kits to do the same.
> They run whenever I open the front door. I have lined up a home for
> them at my cousin Sally's but can't catch them. Any ideas on how to
> trap them? I was wondering about putting the mom in a cat carrier and
> seeing if the kittens will come to her to nurse, but they run away
> when I open the door. thanks in advance,-Jitney

have you tried putting little pieces of food oaround your door? this
might make them warm up to you. sorry if this doesn't help!

Noon Cat Nick
May 20th 07, 05:08 AM
wrote:

> I have a question for you cat experts out there. A young cat showed up
> on my front porch; she was a sweet cat so I started feeding her my
> indoor cat's leftovers and of course, she stayed. A couple of weeks
> later she had a litter of 5 kittens in my yard in a truck tool box.
> They are 8 weeks old now and costing me a bundle to feed. I need to
> round them up to give them away, but I can't get near them. She hisses
> when I try to come near her and has taught her kits to do the same.
> They run whenever I open the front door. I have lined up a home for
> them at my cousin Sally's but can't catch them. Any ideas on how to
> trap them? I was wondering about putting the mom in a cat carrier and
> seeing if the kittens will come to her to nurse, but they run away
> when I open the door. thanks in advance,-Jitney
>
A feral mother cat with kittens is probably something you should have
Animal Control or your local Humane Society handle, ISTM.

But if you'd rather do it yourself, here's how from
http://www.atlantaanimalalliance.com/aaa/howtotrap.htm:

"Some cats can be trapped immediately, but more wary cats will need to
be conditioned to the trap.

"To do this, feed the cats daily at the same time in the same location.
Place a trap in the area you feed. Open the door of the trap and secure
it open with a piece of string or wire. Put the food outside the trap,
but near the open door. Each time you feed, move the food closer, then
into the trap. The door should still be wired open. You can also use a
cage, medium or large pet carriers, or a cardboard box.

"Set the trap at the cats' normal feeding time. You may want to withhold
food for one day prior to trapping to ensure that the cat is hungry
enough to go into the trap. Line the bottom of the trap with a thin
sheet of newspaper and put some wet food, mackerel, anchovies, or tuna
in a paper or plastic dish set all the way in the back of the trap.
Trail a tiny bit of food inside the trap from the front to the back.

"To avoid accidentally trapping skunks or raccoons, try to trap before
dark or just after dawn.

"After the trap is set, hide out of sight - in your car, behind bushes
or trees, or anywhere the cat cannot see you. Once the cat is trapped,
approach quietly and cover the trap with a sheet or towel. This will
quickly calm the cat down....

<>[For trapping kittens] "It is best to use a kitten-sized trap. If you
cannot find one, tie a string to the door of a plastic pet carrier. Then
run the string through the inside of the carrier and out the holes at
the back. Set a brick or something heavy behind the carrier so it will
remain stationary when you pull the string. Hide out of sight holding
the string. When the kitten enters the carrier, pull the string and hold
tight so she cannot push the door open. Keep the string taut until you
latch the door.

"If you are trying to catch a mother cat and her kittens, first catch
the kittens and place them in a plastic pet carrier. Then set a humane
trap and place the carrier with the kittens behind the trap. (The door
of the carrier should be facing the back of the trap.) Cover the end of
the trap and the whole carrier with a sheet or towel. The food and the
sound of the kittens crying will lure the mom cat into the trap."

HTH.

bookie
May 20th 07, 03:21 PM
On 20 May, 05:08, Noon Cat Nick >
wrote:
> wrote:
> > I have a question for you cat experts out there. A young cat showed up
> > on my front porch; she was a sweet cat so I started feeding her my
> > indoor cat's leftovers and of course, she stayed. A couple of weeks
> > later she had a litter of 5 kittens in my yard in a truck tool box.
> > They are 8 weeks old now and costing me a bundle to feed. I need to
> > round them up to give them away, but I can't get near them. She hisses
> > when I try to come near her and has taught her kits to do the same.
> > They run whenever I open the front door. I have lined up a home for
> > them at my cousin Sally's but can't catch them. Any ideas on how to
> > trap them? I was wondering about putting the mom in a cat carrier and
> > seeing if the kittens will come to her to nurse, but they run away
> > when I open the door. thanks in advance,-Jitney
>
> A feral mother cat with kittens is probably something you should have
> Animal Control or your local Humane Society handle, ISTM.
>
> But if you'd rather do it yourself, here's how fromhttp://www.atlantaanimalalliance.com/aaa/howtotrap.htm:
>
> "Some cats can be trapped immediately, but more wary cats will need to
> be conditioned to the trap.
>
> "To do this, feed the cats daily at the same time in the same location.
> Place a trap in the area you feed. Open the door of the trap and secure
> it open with a piece of string or wire. Put the food outside the trap,
> but near the open door. Each time you feed, move the food closer, then
> into the trap. The door should still be wired open. You can also use a
> cage, medium or large pet carriers, or a cardboard box.
>
> "Set the trap at the cats' normal feeding time. You may want to withhold
> food for one day prior to trapping to ensure that the cat is hungry
> enough to go into the trap. Line the bottom of the trap with a thin
> sheet of newspaper and put some wet food, mackerel, anchovies, or tuna
> in a paper or plastic dish set all the way in the back of the trap.
> Trail a tiny bit of food inside the trap from the front to the back.
>
> "To avoid accidentally trapping skunks or raccoons, try to trap before
> dark or just after dawn.
>
> "After the trap is set, hide out of sight - in your car, behind bushes
> or trees, or anywhere the cat cannot see you. Once the cat is trapped,
> approach quietly and cover the trap with a sheet or towel. This will
> quickly calm the cat down....
>
> <>[For trapping kittens] "It is best to use a kitten-sized trap. If you
> cannot find one, tie a string to the door of a plastic pet carrier. Then
> run the string through the inside of the carrier and out the holes at
> the back. Set a brick or something heavy behind the carrier so it will
> remain stationary when you pull the string. Hide out of sight holding
> the string. When the kitten enters the carrier, pull the string and hold
> tight so she cannot push the door open. Keep the string taut until you
> latch the door.
>
> "If you are trying to catch a mother cat and her kittens, first catch
> the kittens and place them in a plastic pet carrier. Then set a humane
> trap and place the carrier with the kittens behind the trap. (The door
> of the carrier should be facing the back of the trap.) Cover the end of
> the trap and the whole carrier with a sheet or towel. The food and the
> sound of the kittens crying will lure the mom cat into the trap."
>
> HTH.

but don't groups like 'animal control' and 'humane society' kill feral
and stray pusscats like this? why cant' the guy just keep feeding
them, and when they are big enough and weaned trap them and get them
neutered/spayed?

i am sure that feeding them for a bit longer is not really going to
bankrupt you is it? please don't turf them out too soon, and don't
call anyone in who is going to hurt them, they have done nothing bad
to you have they? give them the chance of life.

bookie

sheelagh
May 20th 07, 07:00 PM
On 20 May, 03:25, wrote:
> I have a question for you cat experts out there. A young cat showed up
> on my front porch; she was a sweet cat so I started feeding her my
> indoor cat's leftovers and of course, she stayed. A couple of weeks
> later she had a litter of 5 kittens in my yard in a truck tool box.
> They are 8 weeks old now and costing me a bundle to feed. I need to
> round them up to give them away, but I can't get near them. She hisses
> when I try to come near her and has taught her kits to do the same.
> They run whenever I open the front door. I have lined up a home for
> them at my cousin Sally's but can't catch them. Any ideas on how to
> trap them? I was wondering about putting the mom in a cat carrier and
> seeing if the kittens will come to her to nurse, but they run away
> when I open the door. thanks in advance,-Jitney

Oh Dear. It seems that you have a problem on your hands here. You have
fed them, but never interacted with them? The trap is one idea. If you
don't feel able to do the trapping bit yourself, are there no agencies
that you can call in to trap them for you.(human society), so that you
can @least have the chance to get them to interact with you over a few
weeks or so , then you will have the confidence of the kittens, if not
the mother -which will enable you to handle them enough to trust you
and other humans that come into contact with them.

Earning thier trust Will not happen overnight, but you can achieve a
basic trust you need to allow them to be placed with your cousin ?
Then perhaps she can spend the time that they need to become sociable?
Just a thought?!
S;o)

Charlie Wilkes
May 20th 07, 11:05 PM
On Sun, 20 May 2007 07:21:54 -0700, bookie wrote:
>
> but don't groups like 'animal control' and 'humane society' kill feral
> and stray pusscats like this? why cant' the guy just keep feeding them,
> and when they are big enough and weaned trap them and get them
> neutered/spayed?
>
> i am sure that feeding them for a bit longer is not really going to
> bankrupt you is it? please don't turf them out too soon, and don't call
> anyone in who is going to hurt them, they have done nothing bad to you
> have they? give them the chance of life.
>
> bookie

Well, if the guy is finding it expensive to feed this litter, he surely
isn't going to pay to get them all spayed/neutered. This is an
unfortunate situation, because the kittens might be too far along to be
domesticated. I tend to think a call to animal control is the best
answer... it's better than allowing the litter to mature and produce even
more feral cats.

Charlie

sheelagh
May 21st 07, 12:26 AM
On 20 May, 23:05, Charlie Wilkes >
wrote:
> On Sun, 20 May 2007 07:21:54 -0700, bookie wrote:
>
> > but don't groups like 'animal control' and 'humane society' kill feral
> > and stray pusscats like this? why cant' the guy just keep feeding them,
> > and when they are big enough and weaned trap them and get them
> > neutered/spayed?
>
> > i am sure that feeding them for a bit longer is not really going to
> > bankrupt you is it? please don't turf them out too soon, and don't call
> > anyone in who is going to hurt them, they have done nothing bad to you
> > have they? give them the chance of life.
>
> > bookie
>
> Well, if the guy is finding it expensive to feed this litter, he surely
> isn't going to pay to get them all spayed/neutered. This is an
> unfortunate situation, because the kittens might be too far along to be
> domesticated. I tend to think a call to animal control is the best
> answer... it's better than allowing the litter to mature and produce even
> more feral cats.
>
> Charlie




> > > but don't groups like 'animal control' and 'humane society' kill feral
> > and stray pusscats like this? why cant' the guy just keep feeding them,
> > and when they are big enough and weaned trap them and get them
> > neutered/spayed?

In this country we *ALL WOULD* do that, & If we couldn't, we just pick
up the phone and call in the experts to deal with the *ISSUE*, In USA,
they can't, & the ones that are willing to help are the same one that
set the clocks ticking down 28 days, ?& what is not adopted in that
time, gets a good dose of chloroform
;o(
<shudder sadly>

The "only Hope " would be someone like us, or a no kill shelter that
had the resources to come out, trap them, then Socialize them, if that
is still possible @ this age.

( Personally, I think there is a very good chance that they will
become domesticated, because I have managed to do this before now. I
wont tell you that it was easy, because that would be lying!! It took
lots of time, attention & reading up about how they communicate too
(ie: when we smile and expose our gums, a cat See's that as a lethal
threat to their kittens. so you need to know those little bits before
you can think of doing it...!!!)

The cat Protection League, RSPCA, Blue X hospitals ect..But I don't
think their (USA) Country has the sort of charities that we do over
here. Don't forget we get quite a few things that we take for granted
( only because it what we are used to, has always been this way,. so
we have nothing to compare to.)

For instance the NHS, our dentists, we take it for granted that if
there is a problem with an animal, that others would do as we do &
ring the RSPCA, who "Will" respond to you, day or night, & they take
care of our situations...They have to pay for these things, unlike us
luckily.. but I bet you my last hap'penny that the next government, be
it one or the other, will introduce the same way of running the
NHS..<Getting way toooo off point here, snip n soz>

> Well, if the guy is finding it expensive to feed this litter, he surely
> isn't going to pay to get them all spayed/neutered. This is an
> unfortunate situation, because the kittens might be too far along to be
> domesticated. I tend to think a call to animal control is the best
> answer... it's better than allowing the litter to mature and produce even
> more feral cats.


It's difficult call, isn't it? I quite understand the feeding is very
expensive, especially when you don't have enough to play about with it
either....

I also feel that having invested all this time so far, If it was at
all financially viable, it would be great to @ least trap them, then
pass them on to the cousin who is willing to invest more time with
them to socialize them enough to adopt them.( perhaps the OP is
working & doesn't have the time to invest, required for the task @
hand, or simply not around to do it.)

If this really is not an option open to the POP, then I do think that
the next step would be to approach a no kill shelter, to see if they
would be prepared to invest in the kittens...Or am I being far too
overly optimistic thinking this is possible?

If this is the case, then I see no other alternative, however
repulsive the thought.
I think it is a terrible situation to be faced with;o(

If it helps @ all, I have had a litter of [email protected] 10 Weeks old, that
would rather claw your eyes out, than allow you to touch them, but
within 3 weeks, we had them trusting us enough to take food out of our
hands, & even sit with you & puring too.. they are all worth a chance,
if you can offer it......

The other thing is that, Not all vets are willing to spay, neuter them
until 6ish months, because of the risk with the anaesthetic, that they
take whilst fixing them, so not always easy to find a vet willing to
take the task on. This would mean the OP hanging on to them until, 6
months old. If it is a task now, imagine it in 5 months?!!

Such a damned Pity though. If I lived anywhere near you, I would
certainly take them for you;It is such a pity you are not in the UK
You have had a mixed bunch of thoughts here. but the most important
thought is that of your own, because you have to deal with
it.....However, it would be good to hear how you fared in the end
please....?

If you can trap them, great because your cousin can have them. If you
need assistance, I am certain someone from the human society would try
to help you trap them( I hope!!?), or call the Animal Control if you
have no other alternative.
If you have the time, then it is a different case altogether though.
You just move the food each day towards the house until one day it is
in the kitchen...
BINGO.. you have them trust you, stage one!!
Most of all
GOOD LUCK & FARE WELL. Thank you for taking the time to ask.
S;o)

bookie
May 21st 07, 02:13 AM
On 20 May, 23:05, Charlie Wilkes >
wrote:
> On Sun, 20 May 2007 07:21:54 -0700, bookie wrote:
>
> > but don't groups like 'animal control' and 'humane society' kill feral
> > and stray pusscats like this? why cant' the guy just keep feeding them,
> > and when they are big enough and weaned trap them and get them
> > neutered/spayed?
>
> > i am sure that feeding them for a bit longer is not really going to
> > bankrupt you is it? please don't turf them out too soon, and don't call
> > anyone in who is going to hurt them, they have done nothing bad to you
> > have they? give them the chance of life.
>
> > bookie
>
> Well, if the guy is finding it expensive to feed this litter, he surely
> isn't going to pay to get them all spayed/neutered. This is an
> unfortunate situation, because the kittens might be too far along to be
> domesticated. I tend to think a call to animal control is the best
> answer... it's better than allowing the litter to mature and produce even
> more feral cats.
>
> Charlie

don't they have to be interacted with between ages of 3 weeks and 8
weeks so they can be successfully domesticated? not sure, never had
this 'problem' to worry about