PDA

View Full Version : Afraid to have my cats teeth cleaned


Tara Legale
May 23rd 07, 12:24 AM
I am so afraid to have my cats teeth cleaned. I'm petrified of losing her
during the sedation. She is going on nine, means the world to me, I'd be
devastated if I took her in and she died. I've already lost two pets in my
lifetime to anesthesia. I know her back teeth are very heavy with tartar
and plaque and I know when she gets older without the cleaning theres the
increased chance of heart disease. I'm besides myself here.

Noon Cat Nick
May 23rd 07, 12:34 AM
Tara Legale wrote:

>I am so afraid to have my cats teeth cleaned. I'm petrified of losing her
>during the sedation. She is going on nine, means the world to me, I'd be
>devastated if I took her in and she died. I've already lost two pets in my
>lifetime to anesthesia. I know her back teeth are very heavy with tartar
>and plaque and I know when she gets older without the cleaning theres the
>increased chance of heart disease. I'm besides myself here.
>
>

Explain this to your vet, and ask if he/she would be willing to use a
gas anesthesia rather than an injection. If that's not an option,
perhaps the vet would opt for a mild sedative that wears off quickly,
just long enough to clean one or two teeth at a time, so that the teeth
will be taken care of in successive visits rather than all at once.
(I've heard of this having been done for aging or infirm cats.)

cybercat
May 23rd 07, 12:43 AM
"Tara Legale" > wrote in message
...
>I am so afraid to have my cats teeth cleaned. I'm petrified of losing her
>during the sedation. She is going on nine, means the world to me, I'd be
>devastated if I took her in and she died. I've already lost two pets in my
>lifetime to anesthesia. I know her back teeth are very heavy with tartar
>and plaque and I know when she gets older without the cleaning theres the
>increased chance of heart disease. I'm besides myself here.

I had a cat that lived to be 20 and never had a cleaning.
I am also afraid of putting mine under. I probably never will unless dental
work is necessary.

cybercat
May 23rd 07, 12:44 AM
"Noon Cat Nick" > wrote
>
> Explain this to your vet, and ask if he/she would be willing to use a gas
> anesthesia rather than an injection.

Gas can kill them too.

Bluedove
May 23rd 07, 02:31 AM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Noon Cat Nick" > wrote
> >
> > Explain this to your vet, and ask if he/she would be willing to use a
gas
> > anesthesia rather than an injection.
>
> Gas can kill them too.



How so?

I have been always been assured that gas was much, much, safer than the old
and standard injection/ anesthesia.

ML

Noon Cat Nick
May 23rd 07, 02:53 AM
cybercat wrote:

>"Noon Cat Nick" > wrote
>
>
>>Explain this to your vet, and ask if he/she would be willing to use a gas
>>anesthesia rather than an injection.
>>
>>
>
>Gas can kill them too.
>
>

Aha, I wasn't aware of that. Thank you very much for setting me straight
on that.

Eddy Bentley
May 23rd 07, 10:29 AM
Out of interest, how many people actually brush their cats' teeth
regularly?

I'll open by saying I don't. I did when they were kittens, to get them
used to it. I was advised that brushing just the outsides of all the
teeth was sufficient as that's where the tartar can build up. But then
things got busy in my life and that's one weeky cat-chore I decided to
drop. I also figured that as cats only live till they are 20 what's the
point of polishing their pearlies as if they were going to live as long
us? But maybe I shouldn't be so lazy. How many other people are being
as lazy or, perhaps, as rational as me? The kittens certainly never
enjoyed having their teeth cleaned though they did sit there and let me
perform the rather difficult operation.

Can we have some candid discussion on this?

Eddy.

Running Scissors
May 23rd 07, 02:00 PM
Tara Legale wrote:

> I am so afraid to have my cats teeth cleaned. I'm petrified of losing her
> during the sedation. She is going on nine, means the world to me, I'd be
> devastated if I took her in and she died. I've already lost two pets in my
> lifetime to anesthesia. I know her back teeth are very heavy with tartar
> and plaque and I know when she gets older without the cleaning theres the
> increased chance of heart disease. I'm besides myself here.
>
>
Pay extra for the blood test they do beforehand to make sure the
sedative is given correctly. I felt the same way about my cat's teeth
cleaning but he had gum disease and had to have it done in order to
eliminate the threat of heart problems.

Best of luck - be strong.

Running Scissors
May 23rd 07, 02:02 PM
Eddy Bentley wrote:

> Out of interest, how many people actually brush their cats' teeth
> regularly?
>
> I'll open by saying I don't.

I don't either but it's because they won't let me near their mouths
with the toothbrush. Instead, I feel them Science Diet Oral Care and
add an anti-plaque treatment to their water once a month.


> I did when they were kittens, to get them
> used to it. I was advised that brushing just the outsides of all the
> teeth was sufficient as that's where the tartar can build up. But then
> things got busy in my life and that's one weeky cat-chore I decided to
> drop. I also figured that as cats only live till they are 20 what's the
> point of polishing their pearlies as if they were going to live as long
> us? But maybe I shouldn't be so lazy. How many other people are being
> as lazy or, perhaps, as rational as me? The kittens certainly never
> enjoyed having their teeth cleaned though they did sit there and let me
> perform the rather difficult operation.
>
> Can we have some candid discussion on this?
>
> Eddy.
>

Rene S.
May 23rd 07, 02:41 PM
On May 22, 6:24 pm, "Tara Legale" > wrote:
> I am so afraid to have my cats teeth cleaned. I'm petrified of losing her
> during the sedation. She is going on nine, means the world to me, I'd be
> devastated if I took her in and she died. I've already lost two pets in my
> lifetime to anesthesia. I know her back teeth are very heavy with tartar
> and plaque and I know when she gets older without the cleaning theres the
> increased chance of heart disease. I'm besides myself here.

I'm so sorry you've lost two pets to anesthesia! I can understand your
fears. Each time a cat (or person) goes in for surgery, it is a risk,
but you have to weigh the pros and cons of doing the surgery. In this
case, she might a) stop eating because of tooth pain b) get an
infection/abcess from the bad tooth/teeth c) increase risk of heart
disease d)bad breath/drooling/etc.

As another poster get, get bloodwork done to make sure she's fit for
the procedure. Unfortunately, the longer you put this off, the worse
her teeth will get. If you have her teeth cleaned, it could prevent
future problems too (like extractions).

To Eddy about teeth cleaning: I brush my cat's teeth 1-2x per week.
They are quite good about it, though one sometimes acts like he's
being gagged (he's not).

barb
May 23rd 07, 02:58 PM
A lot of years ago my vet came up with some treats that supposedly cleaned
teeth. The cats went crazy for it and with three it was very expensive.
But, one of the cats kept throwing it up and I couldn't see giving it to the
other 2 cats and not her. Then recently they came out with these
"Greenies". We all know that several dogs died of blockages and Greenies
were found clogging up their insides. Now my vet offered something new and
I quickly said "no". My Sapphire needed 2 teeth pulled 2 years before she
died and it was an ordeal. I brought her home very woozy from the
anesthetic although by the next day she was fine.

--
Barb
Of course I don't look busy,
I did it right the first time.

Lis
May 23rd 07, 04:42 PM
On May 22, 7:34 pm, Noon Cat Nick >
wrote:
> Tara Legale wrote:
> >I am so afraid to have my cats teeth cleaned. I'm petrified of losing her
> >during the sedation. She is going on nine, means the world to me, I'd be
> >devastated if I took her in and she died. I've already lost two pets in my
> >lifetime to anesthesia. I know her back teeth are very heavy with tartar
> >and plaque and I know when she gets older without the cleaning theres the
> >increased chance of heart disease. I'm besides myself here.
>
> Explain this to your vet, and ask if he/she would be willing to use a
> gas anesthesia rather than an injection. If that's not an option,
> perhaps the vet would opt for a mild sedative that wears off quickly,
> just long enough to clean one or two teeth at a time, so that the teeth
> will be taken care of in successive visits rather than all at once.
> (I've heard of this having been done for aging or infirm cats.)

Gas induction of anesthesia is NOT safer, ESPECIALLY for older and
medically vulnerable animals. From the Pet Connection blog:
http://www.petconnection.com/blog/2007/05/15/the-anesthesia-myth-that-can-kill-your-pet/

Please read it. But also read this, about the importance of proper
dental care for your cat:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2007/05/15/petscol.DTL

Lis

Lis
May 23rd 07, 04:57 PM
On May 22, 9:31 pm, "Bluedove" <[email protected] home.com> wrote:
> "cybercat" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > "Noon Cat Nick" > wrote
>
> > > Explain this to your vet, and ask if he/she would be willing to use a
> gas
> > > anesthesia rather than an injection.
>
> > Gas can kill them too.
>
> How so?
>
> I have been always been assured that gas was much, much, safer than the old
> and standard injection/ anesthesia.
>
> ML

The safest method is injection induction of anesthesia, and then gas
maintenance. This actually uses less drug, and causes less stress on
the animal.

Lis

cybercat
May 23rd 07, 07:28 PM
"Eddy Bentley" > wrote in message
...
> Out of interest, how many people actually brush their cats' teeth
> regularly?
>
> I'll open by saying I don't. I did when they were kittens, to get them
> used to it. I was advised that brushing just the outsides of all the
> teeth was sufficient as that's where the tartar can build up. But then
> things got busy in my life and that's one weeky cat-chore I decided to
> drop. I also figured that as cats only live till they are 20 what's the
> point of polishing their pearlies as if they were going to live as long
> us? But maybe I shouldn't be so lazy. How many other people are being
> as lazy or, perhaps, as rational as me? The kittens certainly never
> enjoyed having their teeth cleaned though they did sit there and let me
> perform the rather difficult operation.
>
> Can we have some candid discussion on this?
>

The enzymatic, chicken-flavored toothpaste I bought
for my cats is supposed to work if you just smear it on.
*shrug*

I have done it a couple of times, but the cats hate it.

cybercat
May 23rd 07, 07:29 PM
"Running Scissors" > wrote
> and add an anti-plaque treatment to their water once a month.
>

What is this stuff and where do you get it?

cybercat
May 23rd 07, 07:30 PM
"Lis" > wrote
>
> Gas induction of anesthesia is NOT safer, ESPECIALLY for older and
> medically vulnerable animals. From the Pet Connection blog:
> http://www.petconnection.com/blog/2007/05/15/the-anesthesia-myth-that-can-kill-your-pet/
>
> Please read it. But also read this, about the importance of proper
> dental care for your cat:
> http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2007/05/15/petscol.DTL

Thanks, Lis. All I knew was that PEOPLE sometimes die under gas anesthesia,
so I know cats can too.

Running Scissors
May 23rd 07, 07:39 PM
cybercat wrote:

> "Running Scissors" > wrote
>
>>and add an anti-plaque treatment to their water once a month.
>>
>
>
> What is this stuff and where do you get it?
>
>
I get it at Petsmart. Can't remember its name and I'm at work right
now. It's usually the only bottle of this type of treatment on the shelf.

mariib via CatKB.com
May 23rd 07, 09:47 PM
Running Scissors wrote:
>>>and add an anti-plaque treatment to their water once a month.
>>
>> What is this stuff and where do you get it?
>
>I get it at Petsmart. Can't remember its name and I'm at work right
>now. It's usually the only bottle of this type of treatment on the shelf.

I'm using/trying Wysong DentaTreat, a powder to be sprinkled on wet food & is
kindof expensive. Last summer when Little Devil was just 2, the vet told me
he had quite a lot of tartar buildup - very strange because I never before
was aware any of my other cats had a tartar problem - all of the past cats
were fed mainly dry food getting just a small amount of wet as a treat.
Little Devil & Coco who's almost 5, both have only been fed wet food. The vet
last summer said she'd probably have to sedate or anaethesize the little
monster so I've been trying this product & we'll see in a month or so if it's
made any difference. It's sprinkled over the food & is self-described on the
label as a "tasty, effective, natural dentrifice treat for dogs & cats" My
cats love it - of course they eat ANYTHING & EVERYTHING including all kinds
of stuff they shouldn't.
M.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200705/1

Cheryl
May 24th 07, 01:45 AM
On Wed 23 May 2007 02:29:41p, cybercat wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:

> What is this stuff and where do you get it?

Shamrock (my little plagued one with all the problems, though I
think they're related) was prescribed a C.E.T. brand oral hygiene
rinse. It contains

"Ingredients
0.12% Chlorhexidine gluconate, 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride, and
zinc in a soothing alcohol-free vehicle. Chlorhexidine is present
in free and encapsulated form."

You're supposed to spray it in their mouth after each meal, but he
had other ideas. Tried another one that you put in water, but he
doesn't drink a whole lot of water since he eats only canned food
with just a few crunchies for snacks, so that wasn't helpful. I
can't remember where I bought it but this is it:
http://oxyfresh.com/pet/petoralhygiene.asp


--
Cheryl

Luna's Mom[_2_]
May 26th 07, 11:40 PM
Here's my 2 cents.
When I "inherited" Dudley (RIP) he came in some rough shape, including
having terrible teeth and horrid breath that could bend steel bars. Over
the 2 years I had him, he had several bouts of pancreatitis and was ill.
After his first bout with the pancreas, it was suggested that he have
a dental (once he was healed and blood work was back to normal) because
who knew what kind of other infections the bad teeth could be causing.
He was about 12 years old at the time and did quite well with the
anesthesia, etc. I hated to have to do it, but I do think it helped him
for the remaining year and a half of his life.

Then there is Luna, my bratty babe. After a check up, it was mentioned
to me that she had some tartar build up and a dental was recommended.
Still scared of the whole idea, I waited a while, putting it off. After
Dudley died, I decided to go ahead with it anyway because I did not want
her mouth to become the cesspool that Dudley's had. She also did very
well with the procedure and the vet was very happy with her teeth in
general. He said the plaque came right off and that her teeth looked to
be in great shape otherwise. No extractions were necessary and no sign
of disease. What a relief! I've never been able to successfully switch
Luna to a wet diet, so I am hoping that perhaps at the very least, the
dry food she eats has been helping her dental health. Maybe, maybe not. :)

At any rate, I can most certainly understand any fears you may have. As
others have suggested, talk it over with your vet and see what options
you have. Dental care, in MY opinion, is of utmost importance, since the
gums can be a gateway to the rest of the animal's body. (humans, too!)

Good luck!
Pam