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shmamzilla
May 24th 07, 10:01 PM
My youngest kitten isn't cleaning herself well. I've read a couple of the
other threads talking about it being a learned behavior, and while I realize
that is true, the older cat has yet to be a problem and both were born and
raised in a home where they were constantly around older cats. My oldest is a
short-hair and is super flexible. She never has a problem cleaning those
"hard to reach" places. Phoebe, the little one, is a long hair and has gotten
increasingly larger over the past months. She's never been much of a jumper
or climber and as her hair gets longer and she gets bigger, she's not
cleaning herself very well. I've tried trimming the hair under her tail and
I've even resorted to trying to help clean her (which she absolutely hates
and lets me know that by hissing and bitting and growling). The vasoline idea
seemed like a good one, but would make an even bigger mess of her fur if she
isn't already cleaning it. What should I do???

Joe Canuck[_2_]
May 24th 07, 10:54 PM
shmamzilla wrote:
> My youngest kitten isn't cleaning herself well. I've read a couple of the
> other threads talking about it being a learned behavior, and while I realize
> that is true, the older cat has yet to be a problem and both were born and
> raised in a home where they were constantly around older cats. My oldest is a
> short-hair and is super flexible. She never has a problem cleaning those
> "hard to reach" places. Phoebe, the little one, is a long hair and has gotten
> increasingly larger over the past months. She's never been much of a jumper
> or climber and as her hair gets longer and she gets bigger, she's not
> cleaning herself very well. I've tried trimming the hair under her tail and
> I've even resorted to trying to help clean her (which she absolutely hates
> and lets me know that by hissing and bitting and growling). The vasoline idea
> seemed like a good one, but would make an even bigger mess of her fur if she
> isn't already cleaning it. What should I do???
>
Longhaired cats have a harder time with cleaning themselves up,
because of the long hair.

You should be patient and assist as you can and are allowed. Go slow and
very easy as you will hurt the cat if you get rough.

Joe Canuck[_2_]
May 25th 07, 12:25 PM
Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer wrote:
>> cleaning herself very well. I've tried trimming the hair under her tail and I've even resorted to trying to help clean her (which she absolutely
>> hates and lets me know that by hissing and bitting and growling). The
>
> We have had a couple of really shaggy cats and this is not normal for a
> even a very long hair. It can be caused by excessive tenderness acruing
> from one of many possible maladies. If she continues to inadequately keep
> herself clean, I strongly recommend a trip to the vet.
>

It depends on the temperament of the cat and how much hurt is inflicted.

My Ragdoll doesn't want me messing too much with her hind quarters when
brushing or cleaning, but the most she does is meow a bit and squirm
around such that I can no longer reach said areas. But, her temperament
is laid back to begin with. With a cat that is high strung there may be
different reactions exhibited.

I find the best is an occasional bath to get her all cleaned up. There
is only so much brushing and snipping of fur matted with dirt can do.
The water and soap loosen up the dirt.

Of course, the bath is another event she doesn't like much... but does
tolerate.

sheelagh
May 25th 07, 04:05 PM
On 25 May, 12:25, Joe Canuck > wrote:
> Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer wrote:
> >> cleaning herself very well. I've tried trimming the hair under her tail and I've even resorted to trying to help clean her (which she absolutely
> >> hates and lets me know that by hissing and bitting and growling). The
>
> > We have had a couple of really shaggy cats and this is not normal for a
> > even a very long hair. It can be caused by excessive tenderness acruing
> > from one of many possible maladies. If she continues to inadequately keep
> > herself clean, I strongly recommend a trip to the vet.
>
> It depends on the temperament of the cat and how much hurt is inflicted.
>
> My Ragdoll doesn't want me messing too much with her hind quarters when
> brushing or cleaning, but the most she does is meow a bit and squirm
> around such that I can no longer reach said areas. But, her temperament
> is laid back to begin with. With a cat that is high strung there may be
> different reactions exhibited.
>
> I find the best is an occasional bath to get her all cleaned up. There
> is only so much brushing and snipping of fur matted with dirt can do.
> The water and soap loosen up the dirt.
>
> Of course, the bath is another event she doesn't like much... but does
> tolerate.

LOL, tell me about it???

We have Ragdolls too. We have 2 of our own, & one who is staying with
us for the meantime because her mumy is in Hospital. I find that they
are not too bad when you consider thier coat's. I have never really
bathed mine, but when we used to breed, I used to bath the kittens
because it is something that I regret not doing. They have such placid
characters, but I feel it is a little late to start trying now.
If I had that time over again, I would bath them, so my advice is the
same, try bathing her. Just try to be as gentle as you can & make it a
stress free as possible.. you never know, Phoebe might even enjoy it!
Good Luck,
S;o)

Lis
May 25th 07, 11:00 PM
On May 25, 11:05 am, sheelagh > wrote:
> On 25 May, 12:25, Joe Canuck > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer wrote:
> > >> cleaning herself very well. I've tried trimming the hair under her tail and I've even resorted to trying to help clean her (which she absolutely
> > >> hates and lets me know that by hissing and bitting and growling). The
>
> > > We have had a couple of really shaggy cats and this is not normal for a
> > > even a very long hair. It can be caused by excessive tenderness acruing
> > > from one of many possible maladies. If she continues to inadequately keep
> > > herself clean, I strongly recommend a trip to the vet.
>
> > It depends on the temperament of the cat and how much hurt is inflicted.
>
> > My Ragdoll doesn't want me messing too much with her hind quarters when
> > brushing or cleaning, but the most she does is meow a bit and squirm
> > around such that I can no longer reach said areas. But, her temperament
> > is laid back to begin with. With a cat that is high strung there may be
> > different reactions exhibited.
>
> > I find the best is an occasional bath to get her all cleaned up. There
> > is only so much brushing and snipping of fur matted with dirt can do.
> > The water and soap loosen up the dirt.
>
> > Of course, the bath is another event she doesn't like much... but does
> > tolerate.
>
> LOL, tell me about it???
>
> We have Ragdolls too. We have 2 of our own, & one who is staying with
> us for the meantime because her mumy is in Hospital. I find that they
> are not too bad when you consider thier coat's. I have never really
> bathed mine, but when we used to breed, I used to bath the kittens
> because it is something that I regret not doing. They have such placid
> characters, but I feel it is a little late to start trying now.
> If I had that time over again, I would bath them, so my advice is the
> same, try bathing her. Just try to be as gentle as you can & make it a
> stress free as possible.. you never know, Phoebe might even enjoy it!
> Good Luck,
> S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Gentle persistence and the use of treats taught my Maine Coon to like
being groomed when she was a kitten; she's now nine, and reminds me if
I forget or foolishly imagine I'm too tired.:) Bathing is another
matter, but with daily grooming, even with, ahem, the extra challenges
of long-hair cats, bathing is almost never necessary.

My older girl, a short-hair, is now just shy of fourteen. As a kitten,
she was somewhat developmentally challenged, and also had daily
diarrhea until I identified her main food intolerances. Every day I
came home from work, put down my stuff, picked up my kitten, and
headed for the bathroom sink. With that encouragement, plus
elimination of the foods that made her task unfairly harder, she
learned to clean herself and it's not been a problem for thirteen
years now.

Lis

Joe Canuck[_2_]
May 25th 07, 11:45 PM
Lis wrote:
> On May 25, 11:05 am, sheelagh > wrote:
>> On 25 May, 12:25, Joe Canuck > wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>> Cyberiade.it Anonymous Remailer wrote:
>>>>> cleaning herself very well. I've tried trimming the hair under her tail and I've even resorted to trying to help clean her (which she absolutely
>>>>> hates and lets me know that by hissing and bitting and growling). The
>>>> We have had a couple of really shaggy cats and this is not normal for a
>>>> even a very long hair. It can be caused by excessive tenderness acruing
>>>> from one of many possible maladies. If she continues to inadequately keep
>>>> herself clean, I strongly recommend a trip to the vet.
>>> It depends on the temperament of the cat and how much hurt is inflicted.
>>> My Ragdoll doesn't want me messing too much with her hind quarters when
>>> brushing or cleaning, but the most she does is meow a bit and squirm
>>> around such that I can no longer reach said areas. But, her temperament
>>> is laid back to begin with. With a cat that is high strung there may be
>>> different reactions exhibited.
>>> I find the best is an occasional bath to get her all cleaned up. There
>>> is only so much brushing and snipping of fur matted with dirt can do.
>>> The water and soap loosen up the dirt.
>>> Of course, the bath is another event she doesn't like much... but does
>>> tolerate.
>> LOL, tell me about it???
>>
>> We have Ragdolls too. We have 2 of our own, & one who is staying with
>> us for the meantime because her mumy is in Hospital. I find that they
>> are not too bad when you consider thier coat's. I have never really
>> bathed mine, but when we used to breed, I used to bath the kittens
>> because it is something that I regret not doing. They have such placid
>> characters, but I feel it is a little late to start trying now.
>> If I had that time over again, I would bath them, so my advice is the
>> same, try bathing her. Just try to be as gentle as you can & make it a
>> stress free as possible.. you never know, Phoebe might even enjoy it!
>> Good Luck,
>> S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> Gentle persistence and the use of treats taught my Maine Coon to like
> being groomed when she was a kitten; she's now nine, and reminds me if
> I forget or foolishly imagine I'm too tired.:) Bathing is another
> matter, but with daily grooming, even with, ahem, the extra challenges
> of long-hair cats, bathing is almost never necessary.
>
> My older girl, a short-hair, is now just shy of fourteen. As a kitten,
> she was somewhat developmentally challenged, and also had daily
> diarrhea until I identified her main food intolerances. Every day I
> came home from work, put down my stuff, picked up my kitten, and
> headed for the bathroom sink. With that encouragement, plus
> elimination of the foods that made her task unfairly harder, she
> learned to clean herself and it's not been a problem for thirteen
> years now.
>
> Lis
>

My Ragdoll actually loves getting brushed... just be careful around the
hind quarters because the purring may stop. :-D