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May 29th 07, 10:41 PM
My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.

We can't bear the thought of our 'children' being euthanised at a
local shelter. We found a no-kill shelter (The Northeast Tennessee
Animal League), but it is beyond full, and the people who run it have
no suggestions as to where else we might turn.

Our cats are all adults - two males and a female - all spayed and
neutered. They are six, nine and ten years old and free of disease.
The female cat spends most of her time outside and is a first rate
hunter of rodents and birds. The two males lead a more leisurely
life, mostly indoors.

We live in Southwest Virginia, not far from the Tennessee border. If
you can provide a good, loving home or have advice, please let us
know.

Thanks.

cybercat
May 29th 07, 11:02 PM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
> cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
> years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.
>

I have allergies, I am on asthma medication. Horse ****.

Advertising here is a great way to get someone to come pick
up your cats and torture them to death.

Maybe they will send you pictures.

bookie
May 30th 07, 02:05 AM
On 29 May, 22:41, wrote:
> My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
> cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
> years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.
>
> We can't bear the thought of our 'children' being euthanised at a
> local shelter. We found a no-kill shelter (The Northeast Tennessee
> Animal League), but it is beyond full, and the people who run it have
> no suggestions as to where else we might turn.
>
> Our cats are all adults - two males and a female - all spayed and
> neutered. They are six, nine and ten years old and free of disease.
> The female cat spends most of her time outside and is a first rate
> hunter of rodents and birds. The two males lead a more leisurely
> life, mostly indoors.
>
> We live in Southwest Virginia, not far from the Tennessee border. If
> you can provide a good, loving home or have advice, please let us
> know.
>
> Thanks.

you can get various products these days to help with allergies, ask
your doctor or vet, if you really want to keep your cats yuo will go
find something. or you coudl buy your wife a face mask.

i am also fairly allergic to certain cats, our old tortie tegan used
to have my eyes runnign really bad and i was sneezing the whole time
but NO WAY would she have gone to another home. life without her woudl
have been awful (it is in fact although I ahve 2 little princesses to
keep me company now)

bookie

sheelagh
May 30th 07, 05:17 PM
On 29 May, 22:41, wrote:
> My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
> cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
> years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.
>
> We can't bear the thought of our 'children' being euthanised at a
> local shelter. We found a no-kill shelter (The Northeast Tennessee
> Animal League), but it is beyond full, and the people who run it have
> no suggestions as to where else we might turn.
>
> Our cats are all adults - two males and a female - all spayed and
> neutered. They are six, nine and ten years old and free of disease.
> The female cat spends most of her time outside and is a first rate
> hunter of rodents and birds. The two males lead a more leisurely
> life, mostly indoors.
>
> We live in Southwest Virginia, not far from the Tennessee border. If
> you can provide a good, loving home or have advice, please let us
> know.
>
> Thanks.


>
> I have allergies, I am on asthma medication

So am I. I have had asthma for 20 years now, & my allergies are so bad
that if I stick my face in my cats fur, my eyes stream with water & I
can't stop sneezing!!
However, I would rather suffer the misery of it, than let my family
members go...
I recognise your free will to do as you see fit, but whatever you do,
don "Not" advertise on here because you have no idea who they
are...they are merely pixels, & carry go guarantee that your cat will
be safely homed.

If I were in your frame of mind, I would advise you to advertise
locally in your area first, & also ask family and friends whether they
would consider calling them in. You might be pleasantly surprised with
what some people do when they realise that the alternative is that
they will be bumped off, if, you don't find someone soon..I can assure
you of this, because it has happened to me before & I have taken in up
to a dozen or so in the last 2 years.....

If there are no family or friends, try a free local advertising place.
We have local news papers that will allow you to do this, because the
buyer pays for the paper. If you don;'t get anyone at all & you have
really tried everything else that you can think of, then call the
*nearest no kill shelter that has the space for them* & allow them the
chance to find someone who will have them. You owe them that last
chance. After all, you chose them, not the other way around, so they
are depending on you for that. You can't just kill them, surely?

Lastly, does anyone live near this area who might know of anyone that
can help these people out with information on no kill shelters in this
area?
S;o)

James
May 30th 07, 06:56 PM
On May 29, 5:41 pm, wrote:
> My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
> cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
> years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.
>
> We can't bear the thought of our 'children' being euthanised at a
> local shelter. We found a no-kill shelter (The Northeast Tennessee
> Animal League), but it is beyond full, and the people who run it have
> no suggestions as to where else we might turn.
>
> Our cats are all adults - two males and a female - all spayed and
> neutered. They are six, nine and ten years old and free of disease.
> The female cat spends most of her time outside and is a first rate
> hunter of rodents and birds. The two males lead a more leisurely
> life, mostly indoors.
>
> We live in Southwest Virginia, not far from the Tennessee border. If
> you can provide a good, loving home or have advice, please let us
> know.
>
> Thanks.

You can make them outdoor cats. That might reduce much of the
allergic symptoms.

You can have a waterproof cat house with heat lamp. My pussy some
times refuses to come indoor for the night even in winter. Now is the
best time of year to have them get used to outdoor temperatures.

mariib via CatKB.com
May 30th 07, 07:32 PM
wrote:
>My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
>cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
>years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.
>
>Thanks.

I'm another with allergies always & on asthma medication the past 15 years -
Singulaire tablets regularly, the long-acting Advair puffer & when needed the
fast-acting Ventolin. I've had cats for 35 years now, so they've probably
played a role in my asthma but I wouldn't consider giving them up under any
condition. My eldest son was born when my first cats were 4 years old & he
was diagnosed at 2 years old with asthma & his was/is a very reactive type.
Somehow, the cats "knew" to stay away from him & he always avoided them in
turn. We had a big house, so it wasn't difficult. His symptoms were quite
well-controlled as he grew up & our family doctor made him take control of
his medications & activities when he was 11 (i.e. he took away the control
from me & gave the responsibiliity to my young son - scary, but it worked).
He's now in his 30's, living in the US in a great climate for an asthma-
sufferer so he rarely has symptoms anymore. It helped my son that my long-
haired part Maine Coon white cat was very used to & tolerated without
complaint being shaved with animal clippers right from the beginning as a
kitten. He used to look so strange with the resulting rippled coat for the
first couple weeks after each shaving because I could never shave him evenly,
but once it started growing out, he looked fine.

Explore your options first, & if you are still determined to give your
"children" away, be very careful who you choose. They are totally dependent
on you & you owe them the very best home you can find.
M.

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200705/1

sheelagh
May 31st 07, 12:23 AM
On 30 May, 19:32, "mariib via CatKB.com" <[email protected]> wrote:
> wrote:
> >My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
> >cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
> >years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.
>
> >Thanks.
>
> I'm another with allergies always & on asthma medication the past 15 years -
> Singulaire tablets regularly, the long-acting Advair puffer & when needed the
> fast-acting Ventolin. I've had cats for 35 years now, so they've probably
> played a role in my asthma but I wouldn't consider giving them up under any
> condition. My eldest son was born when my first cats were 4 years old & he
> was diagnosed at 2 years old with asthma & his was/is a very reactive type.
> Somehow, the cats "knew" to stay away from him & he always avoided them in
> turn. We had a big house, so it wasn't difficult. His symptoms were quite
> well-controlled as he grew up & our family doctor made him take control of
> his medications & activities when he was 11 (i.e. he took away the control
> from me & gave the responsibiliity to my young son - scary, but it worked).
> He's now in his 30's, living in the US in a great climate for an asthma-
> sufferer so he rarely has symptoms anymore. It helped my son that my long-
> haired part Maine Coon white cat was very used to & tolerated without
> complaint being shaved with animal clippers right from the beginning as a
> kitten. He used to look so strange with the resulting rippled coat for the
> first couple weeks after each shaving because I could never shave him evenly,
> but once it started growing out, he looked fine.
>
> Explore your options first, & if you are still determined to give your
> "children" away, be very careful who you choose. They are totally dependent
> on you & you owe them the very best home you can find.
> M.
>
> --
> Message posted via CatKB.comhttp://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200705/1

Very Nicely said Marri....
You said everything I meant!

S;o)

MaryL
May 31st 07, 01:07 AM
> wrote in message
oups.com...
> My family is very sad about this, but we must find new homes for our
> cats. My wife has developed allergies, that over the lastg three
> years have become so severe she is now on asthma medication.
>
> We can't bear the thought of our 'children' being euthanised at a
> local shelter. We found a no-kill shelter (The Northeast Tennessee
> Animal League), but it is beyond full, and the people who run it have
> no suggestions as to where else we might turn.
>
> Our cats are all adults - two males and a female - all spayed and
> neutered. They are six, nine and ten years old and free of disease.
> The female cat spends most of her time outside and is a first rate
> hunter of rodents and birds. The two males lead a more leisurely
> life, mostly indoors.
>
> We live in Southwest Virginia, not far from the Tennessee border. If
> you can provide a good, loving home or have advice, please let us
> know.
>
> Thanks.
>

Before you do that, please consider an electrostatic air conditioner filter
(assuming you have central air). My parents had one built into their
furnace/AC unit. It was permanent and was washed "in place" by simply
having a bottle of soap attached to the unit and then pressing a button once
a month to start the wash cycle. It was expensive but *very* effective. My
brother-in-law was very allergic to cats. He loved them but would start
wheezing within minutes of entering our house. Then my parents had the
filter installed (but without telling him). The next time he visited, he
had been there for nearly an hour when he suddenly said, "Hey, I haven't
coughed even once." I don't remember the name of the company, but I did a
search and came up with this system:
http://www.garbes.com/filter/filter1.html

As I said, their built-in permanent filter was expensive. When I bought my
first house, I opted for a much less expensive arrangement. I bought the
type of electrostatic filter that needs to be replaced, taken outside once a
month and spray with water. When dry, reinstall it. I don't think it was
quite as effective, but it was very good -- and for a fraction of the cost.
Here are some examples:
http://www.airfactor.com/
http://www.allergystore.com/acfilter.htm

MaryL