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View Full Version : Downside of Fewer Depo Medrol Shots?


cybercat
May 30th 07, 05:51 PM
Some of you know that I have a cat with allergies and asthma, "EGC" immune
system problems. Because she gets both lesions of the lip and linear
granulomas on her legs, AND asthma attacks and congestion AND general
itchiness to the point of scratching her ears raw, my vet and I decided
early on to try Depo Medrol (steroid) shots. They work great! However, there
is a risk of serious side effects such as diabetes if they are given too
often. What is two often? My vet said more than once every two months.

Well, I worked hard to minimize allergens in the house and switched her food
around, with some success. She went a year with no lesions of any kind,
first time in the 5.5 years I have had her!! AND no asthma attacks.

Until this morning. She had a coughing/wheezing fit and I took her right in.
She is fine except for some new plaque buildup, the congestion, and slightly
runny stools, which she has had for a while. I thought maybe my giving her
new flavors of Fancy Feast did it--the fish flavors instead of beef and
chicken--but the vet said diarrhea is another side effect of the allergy
complex EGC. She gave me a liquid medicine (metronidazole) and a little
syringe, I am to dose her 0.5 ml twice a day. It is supposed to restore her
normal gut flora.

So, I am thinking she needs to have two Depo shots a year, that it might not
be the best thing to try to take her down to one a year. She's been frisky
and happy, but itchy and congested, too.

Spot
May 30th 07, 11:57 PM
My mother has a 16 year old cat who has either been on prednisolone pills or
depo medrol shots for the last 12 years for granulomas. She hasn't
developed diabetes yet.

I don't think that twice a year is over kill on this if you can keep it
under control using other methods along with it.

I had a cat who had severe asthma she took theophylline on a daily basis
along with lasix. I did like you and minimized everything that could
trigger and event. I was pretty good at watching her body language and
could tell when she was about to have an attack and could increase her
prednisone accordingly prior to the attack to minimize it. But sometimes it
didn't work and she still ended up with a shot.

Sometimes you have to outweigh the risk verses the benefits.

Celeste


"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
> Some of you know that I have a cat with allergies and asthma, "EGC" immune
> system problems. Because she gets both lesions of the lip and linear
> granulomas on her legs, AND asthma attacks and congestion AND general
> itchiness to the point of scratching her ears raw, my vet and I decided
> early on to try Depo Medrol (steroid) shots. They work great! However,
> there is a risk of serious side effects such as diabetes if they are given
> too often. What is two often? My vet said more than once every two months.
>
> Well, I worked hard to minimize allergens in the house and switched her
> food around, with some success. She went a year with no lesions of any
> kind, first time in the 5.5 years I have had her!! AND no asthma attacks.
>
> Until this morning. She had a coughing/wheezing fit and I took her right
> in. She is fine except for some new plaque buildup, the congestion, and
> slightly runny stools, which she has had for a while. I thought maybe my
> giving her new flavors of Fancy Feast did it--the fish flavors instead of
> beef and chicken--but the vet said diarrhea is another side effect of the
> allergy complex EGC. She gave me a liquid medicine (metronidazole) and a
> little syringe, I am to dose her 0.5 ml twice a day. It is supposed to
> restore her normal gut flora.
>
> So, I am thinking she needs to have two Depo shots a year, that it might
> not be the best thing to try to take her down to one a year. She's been
> frisky and happy, but itchy and congested, too.
>

Cheryl
May 31st 07, 12:20 AM
On Wed 30 May 2007 12:51:08p, cybercat wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:

[...]
> So, I am thinking she needs to have two Depo shots a year, that
> it might not be the best thing to try to take her down to one a
> year. She's been frisky and happy, but itchy and congested, too.

Good post, thanks for thinking of this. As you know my Shamrock has
the same problems that Gracie has, except no sign of asthma. I
haven't been successful in eliminating the allergens that cause his
flare-ups, but the Cyclosporine has been mostly effective, with
only one time now needing a boost from one Depo shot in almost the
last year. I have noticed he has stinky runny poop now, but until
you posted that I forgot about Shadow and his IBD, and IBD is also
an auto-immune disease. That is treated with steroids, too, if
altering the diet doesn't help. So you're right, they are related.
I guess I'll have to talk with his vet about this. He might benefit
from 2x yearly, too. Gosh I hate overloading his system with drugs
but as Celeste said you have to measure the risks against the
benefits and do what helps their QOL.

--
Cheryl

cybercat
May 31st 07, 01:07 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote
> I have noticed he has stinky runny poop now, but until
> you posted that I forgot about Shadow and his IBD, and IBD is also
> an auto-immune disease. That is treated with steroids, too, if
> altering the diet doesn't help. So you're right, they are related.
> I guess I'll have to talk with his vet about this. He might benefit
> from 2x yearly, too. Gosh I hate overloading his system with drugs
> but as Celeste said you have to measure the risks against the
> benefits and do what helps their QOL.
>

Cheryl, I forgot to say, that his is what my vet said--she actually
mentioned that "these cats with autoimmune deficiency often
develop IBD." From reading about that in this group, I knew
it could be bad, and she agreed. Thanks for mentioning it.

I think Depo Medrol can be a miracle drug when used
carefully, for some cats.

Granted, Rhonda had a terrible experience with a similar
drug, was it one dose and the cat becale diabetic? Poor
baby.

One scary thing: this vet convinced me that Gracie has got
to have a dental, with anesthetic, ugh that scares me to death.
She said complications are very rare, and that given Gracie's
risk of infection, it is worth the risk of the anesthesia. If I do
it I am going to be a wreck until she is back in my arms, awake.
And I will do it. I want to give her every chance.

cybercat
May 31st 07, 02:21 AM
"Cheryl" > wrote
>
> If it makes you feel any better, Shamrock has had 2 dentals in his
> young life. He has a tendency toward gingivitis (probably also
> related, but that's a guess). He's been fine both times, though our
> *new* vet gave him a different anesthesia and it took him a long time
> to come out of it even after coming home.

ahhhh, gad, I would have been a wreck.

Thing is, the vet showed me the tartar buildup on
one side--just one, isn't that odd? She is really neat,
she said, "in our teeth and cats' teeth, plaque is like
a little bacteria castle. It takes calcium and other things
from our blood and builds a nice little home for itself."

I love my new vet. She takes time to explain more
complicated things as well, like my Boo's fainting
spells and how they relate to her hyperthyroid. The
old vet put her on beta blockers but never bothered
to explain. This one told me about hypertrophic
cardiomyopathy in hyperT cats, and most importantly,
that once the thyroid levels are corrected it is COMPLETELY
REVERSABLE, which means she has probably had no
business being on the beta blocker this long. And this vet
did not mind talking about Boo even though it was during
Gracie's appointment.