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andrewvc
June 4th 07, 04:32 AM
My cat, about 13 yo, siamese-russian blue mix - sweet as can be.

Recently, we noticed that on one of her ears there are small, flat growths
protuding from the top of her ears. They look like small, flat tab-like
things that are hairless but soft. They seem to bother her when we touch it,
but not extremely so. We know she doesn't have mites or bug infections since
she has been to the vet. We noticed this awhile after her visit.

We haven't seen anything on the web about what this could be. Any clues or
possible info on what it might be or called?

Thanks! We know she is getting on but still seems quite her normal self.

-A

MaryL
June 4th 07, 05:40 AM
"andrewvc" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> My cat, about 13 yo, siamese-russian blue mix - sweet as can be.
>
> Recently, we noticed that on one of her ears there are small, flat growths
> protuding from the top of her ears. They look like small, flat tab-like
> things that are hairless but soft. They seem to bother her when we touch
> it,
> but not extremely so. We know she doesn't have mites or bug infections
> since
> she has been to the vet. We noticed this awhile after her visit.
>
> We haven't seen anything on the web about what this could be. Any clues
> or
> possible info on what it might be or called?
>
> Thanks! We know she is getting on but still seems quite her normal self.
>
> -A
>

At age 13, she is not "getting on." Just like people, "seniors" can be
happy, healthy, and have many good years left. My Holly is 12 and still
seems like a young cat. My first cat lived to be almost 20. That was many
years ago, and average lifespan for indoor cats has increased significantly
since then.

I'm sure you already know the real answer to your question...it's common
sense. That is, you need to see a vet and it should be done ASAP. There's
a good chance that this is something relatively simple, but it's always
better to catch problems early rather than wait until the problem may become
more difficult to treat. You might even learn that it's a harmless skin
growth, but there is no way to make a diagnosis like that over the Internet
(and I am concerned over the fact that you said it seems to bother your cat
if you touch these growths).

MaryL

andrewvc
June 4th 07, 05:53 AM
Thanks, ML, for your words of comfort (and caution).
We will be taking her to the vet this week to find out what those things are
but wanted to get info ahead of time, too.

MaryL wrote:
>> My cat, about 13 yo, siamese-russian blue mix - sweet as can be.
>>
>[quoted text clipped - 13 lines]
>>
>> -A
>
>At age 13, she is not "getting on." Just like people, "seniors" can be
>happy, healthy, and have many good years left. My Holly is 12 and still
>seems like a young cat. My first cat lived to be almost 20. That was many
>years ago, and average lifespan for indoor cats has increased significantly
>since then.
>
>I'm sure you already know the real answer to your question...it's common
>sense. That is, you need to see a vet and it should be done ASAP. There's
>a good chance that this is something relatively simple, but it's always
>better to catch problems early rather than wait until the problem may become
>more difficult to treat. You might even learn that it's a harmless skin
>growth, but there is no way to make a diagnosis like that over the Internet
>(and I am concerned over the fact that you said it seems to bother your cat
>if you touch these growths).
>
>MaryL

MaryL
June 4th 07, 05:56 AM
Good! I'm glad to hear you will be seeing a vet this week.

And, thanks for the memory...my father used to call me "M.L."

MaryL


"andrewvc" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
> Thanks, ML, for your words of comfort (and caution).
> We will be taking her to the vet this week to find out what those things
> are
> but wanted to get info ahead of time, too.
>
> MaryL wrote:
>>> My cat, about 13 yo, siamese-russian blue mix - sweet as can be.
>>>
>>[quoted text clipped - 13 lines]
>>>
>>> -A
>>
>>At age 13, she is not "getting on." Just like people, "seniors" can be
>>happy, healthy, and have many good years left. My Holly is 12 and still
>>seems like a young cat. My first cat lived to be almost 20. That was
>>many
>>years ago, and average lifespan for indoor cats has increased
>>significantly
>>since then.
>>
>>I'm sure you already know the real answer to your question...it's common
>>sense. That is, you need to see a vet and it should be done ASAP.
>>There's
>>a good chance that this is something relatively simple, but it's always
>>better to catch problems early rather than wait until the problem may
>>become
>>more difficult to treat. You might even learn that it's a harmless skin
>>growth, but there is no way to make a diagnosis like that over the
>>Internet
>>(and I am concerned over the fact that you said it seems to bother your
>>cat
>>if you touch these growths).
>>
>>MaryL
>