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Naomi
June 5th 07, 09:04 PM
Hi all, some of you may have seen my previous post about my poorly
moggy Clyde. I was just wondering if anyone had had a similar
experience and if you know if a spinal injury is treatable? I've read
on the internet about complete rest for weeks on end, or surgery... if
surgery is an option, how much (roughly) would it cost?

I'm just trying to think of positives as I can't bear losing my Clyde.

Thanks all,
Naomi

yngver
June 5th 07, 09:36 PM
On Jun 5, 3:04 pm, Naomi > wrote:
> Hi all, some of you may have seen my previous post about my poorly
> moggy Clyde. I was just wondering if anyone had had a similar
> experience and if you know if a spinal injury is treatable? I've read
> on the internet about complete rest for weeks on end, or surgery... if
> surgery is an option, how much (roughly) would it cost?
>
> I'm just trying to think of positives as I can't bear losing my Clyde.
>
> Thanks all,
> Naomi

Naomi, I am sorry to hear about Clyde. I hope you have more news now
from the vet about what is going on.

A spinal injury can affect the tail and ability to urinate/defecate
due to pressure on the spinal cord.

Spinal injuries may be treatable--it just depends. I believe your vet
prescribed some kind of anti-inflammatory to reduce pressure on the
spinal cord. This may help, and I think you said it was helping at
first.

A few years ago we rescued a cat who had been shot by some kids with a
pellet gun. He had pellets lodged along his spine and due to the
position, the vets at the rescue did not want to do surgery. My point
is that depending what is going on, surgery may be an option. With
this cat, the rescue foundation tried a number of treatments to help
him regain the use of his legs, including acupuncture. He eventually
was able to stand but he was never able to walk, unfortunately, nor
did he regain control of his bladder. However, he lived for several
years and got around quite well, after being adopted by someone who
was able to care for him. His eventual death had nothing to do with
his spinal cord injury (he was also FIV positive).

I just wanted to let you know that many cats do recover from spinal
injuries but even if they don't, cats can adapt to hind leg paralysis.
I hope very much that your vet is able to ascertain what is causing
your cat's problem and is able to treat it.
-yngver

Naomi
June 5th 07, 09:54 PM
On 5 Jun, 21:36, yngver > wrote:
> On Jun 5, 3:04 pm, Naomi > wrote:
>
> > Hi all, some of you may have seen my previous post about my poorly
> > moggy Clyde. I was just wondering if anyone had had a similar
> > experience and if you know if a spinal injury is treatable? I've read
> > on the internet about complete rest for weeks on end, or surgery... if
> > surgery is an option, how much (roughly) would it cost?
>
> > I'm just trying to think of positives as I can't bear losing my Clyde.
>
> > Thanks all,
> > Naomi
>
> Naomi, I am sorry to hear about Clyde. I hope you have more news now
> from the vet about what is going on.
>
> A spinal injury can affect the tail and ability to urinate/defecate
> due to pressure on the spinal cord.
>
> Spinal injuries may be treatable--it just depends. I believe your vet
> prescribed some kind of anti-inflammatory to reduce pressure on the
> spinal cord. This may help, and I think you said it was helping at
> first.
>
> A few years ago we rescued a cat who had been shot by some kids with a
> pellet gun. He had pellets lodged along his spine and due to the
> position, the vets at the rescue did not want to do surgery. My point
> is that depending what is going on, surgery may be an option. With
> this cat, the rescue foundation tried a number of treatments to help
> him regain the use of his legs, including acupuncture. He eventually
> was able to stand but he was never able to walk, unfortunately, nor
> did he regain control of his bladder. However, he lived for several
> years and got around quite well, after being adopted by someone who
> was able to care for him. His eventual death had nothing to do with
> his spinal cord injury (he was also FIV positive).
>
> I just wanted to let you know that many cats do recover from spinal
> injuries but even if they don't, cats can adapt to hind leg paralysis.
> I hope very much that your vet is able to ascertain what is causing
> your cat's problem and is able to treat it.
> -yngver

Thank you yngver for your helpful comments... It does give me some
hope that Clyde can still go on for years to come. He isn't old by any
means (eight or nine) and hopefully the vet will have some good news
for me tomorrow. I still need to discuss with him tomorrow what the
course of action will be before he goes ahead with the tests. The
thing I'm worried about is the blood and puss leaking out of his
bladder. If this is being caused by displacement in his spine, then
how will he recover unless he has surgery to alleviate the pressure?
The incontenance I can handle, we have vinyl flooring in some rooms, I
just wonder what the vet can do without surgery.

Naomi
June 5th 07, 10:03 PM
On 5 Jun, 21:36, yngver > wrote:
> On Jun 5, 3:04 pm, Naomi > wrote:
>
> > Hi all, some of you may have seen my previous post about my poorly
> > moggy Clyde. I was just wondering if anyone had had a similar
> > experience and if you know if a spinal injury is treatable? I've read
> > on the internet about complete rest for weeks on end, or surgery... if
> > surgery is an option, how much (roughly) would it cost?
>
> > I'm just trying to think of positives as I can't bear losing my Clyde.
>
> > Thanks all,
> > Naomi
>
> Naomi, I am sorry to hear about Clyde. I hope you have more news now
> from the vet about what is going on.
>
> A spinal injury can affect the tail and ability to urinate/defecate
> due to pressure on the spinal cord.
>
> Spinal injuries may be treatable--it just depends. I believe your vet
> prescribed some kind of anti-inflammatory to reduce pressure on the
> spinal cord. This may help, and I think you said it was helping at
> first.
>
> A few years ago we rescued a cat who had been shot by some kids with a
> pellet gun. He had pellets lodged along his spine and due to the
> position, the vets at the rescue did not want to do surgery. My point
> is that depending what is going on, surgery may be an option. With
> this cat, the rescue foundation tried a number of treatments to help
> him regain the use of his legs, including acupuncture. He eventually
> was able to stand but he was never able to walk, unfortunately, nor
> did he regain control of his bladder. However, he lived for several
> years and got around quite well, after being adopted by someone who
> was able to care for him. His eventual death had nothing to do with
> his spinal cord injury (he was also FIV positive).
>
> I just wanted to let you know that many cats do recover from spinal
> injuries but even if they don't, cats can adapt to hind leg paralysis.
> I hope very much that your vet is able to ascertain what is causing
> your cat's problem and is able to treat it.
> -yngver

Thank you yngver for your helpful comments, your kind thoughts and
giving me a little hope... I've been sitting here sobbing, but
hopefully I'm being pessimistic and we'll have Clyde for years to
come.. He isn't old by any means (eight or nine) and hopefully the vet
will have some good news
for me tomorrow. I still need to discuss with him tomorrow what the
course of action will be before he goes ahead with the tests. The
thing I'm worried about is the blood and puss leaking out of his
bladder. If this is being caused by displacement in his spine, then
how will he recover unless he has surgery to alleviate the pressure?
The incontenance I can handle, we have vinyl flooring in some rooms,
I
just wonder what the vet can do without surgery.

The house is SO empty without him, I went to his area and put aside
his food and water bowl to try to put him out of my mind, it didn't
work :-(

My husband is allergic to cats, the only reason Clyde is here is
because my Mum moved and couldn't take him with her. Clyde lived with
her for the last few years since we moved out of her house. I know my
husband suffers from having the cat around and I'm afraid I won't be
able to get another one in the future. I am - and always have been - a
cat person and I really miss having one around. I like dogs, we have
one, but he's a particularly mischevious dog and I'm not fond of him
at all. I hope one day in the near future they'll create a miracle
cure for cat allergies!

Anyway, sorry to waffle, thank you again for your help,
Naomi

sheelagh
June 5th 07, 10:17 PM
On 5 Jun, 21:04, Naomi > wrote:
> Hi all, some of you may have seen my previous post about my poorly
> moggy Clyde. I was just wondering if anyone had had a similar
> experience and if you know if a spinal injury is treatable? I've read
> on the internet about complete rest for weeks on end, or surgery... if
> surgery is an option, how much (roughly) would it cost?
>
> I'm just trying to think of positives as I can't bear losing my Clyde.
>
> Thanks all,
> Naomi

Hi Naomi,

I Haven't got time to post as I would like to, so will try again
later
after kids get their homework done...


With regard to vets fee's and help with them, please have a look @
this link because I think they might be able to help out here.
Explain
better later. For now, I will leave this links for your
consideration...( I live in the UK too)


http://www.pdsa.org.uk/managed/finder.html


This charity has hospitals, & will also help with private vet's fee's
too. If you happen to live near one of their hospital's, or any that
they recommend, then use them because they are brilliant;if not then
use your normal vet & they will help out with the fee's there
instead.....


http://www.rspca.org.uk/


The RSPCA also help out financially if you need it too. I think it is
only about 60 per visit, but that helps when you need it..
Hoping to hear how you got on today, later.
Good Luck!
S;o)

blkcatgal
June 6th 07, 12:03 AM
I had a cat that had a spinal compression that was probably the result of
arthritis. I consulted with an orthopedic surgeon. I elected to have
surgery mainly because that was the only option....medication was not
helping. The cost was fairly substantial, between $4000-$5000. The clinic
I went to did offer payment options. The surgery was successful for the
most part and my cat lived another 3 years (he was 13 at the time of
surgery).

S.

"Naomi" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Hi all, some of you may have seen my previous post about my poorly
> moggy Clyde. I was just wondering if anyone had had a similar
> experience and if you know if a spinal injury is treatable? I've read
> on the internet about complete rest for weeks on end, or surgery... if
> surgery is an option, how much (roughly) would it cost?
>
> I'm just trying to think of positives as I can't bear losing my Clyde.
>
> Thanks all,
> Naomi
>

cindys
June 6th 07, 12:19 AM
"Naomi" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> On 5 Jun, 21:36, yngver > wrote:
>> On Jun 5, 3:04 pm, Naomi > wrote:
>>
>> > Hi all, some of you may have seen my previous post about my poorly
>> > moggy Clyde. I was just wondering if anyone had had a similar
>> > experience and if you know if a spinal injury is treatable? I've read
>> > on the internet about complete rest for weeks on end, or surgery... if
>> > surgery is an option, how much (roughly) would it cost?
>>
>> > I'm just trying to think of positives as I can't bear losing my Clyde.
>>
>> > Thanks all,
>> > Naomi
>>
>> Naomi, I am sorry to hear about Clyde. I hope you have more news now
>> from the vet about what is going on.
>>
>> A spinal injury can affect the tail and ability to urinate/defecate
>> due to pressure on the spinal cord.
>>
>> Spinal injuries may be treatable--it just depends. I believe your vet
>> prescribed some kind of anti-inflammatory to reduce pressure on the
>> spinal cord. This may help, and I think you said it was helping at
>> first.
>>
>> A few years ago we rescued a cat who had been shot by some kids with a
>> pellet gun. He had pellets lodged along his spine and due to the
>> position, the vets at the rescue did not want to do surgery. My point
>> is that depending what is going on, surgery may be an option. With
>> this cat, the rescue foundation tried a number of treatments to help
>> him regain the use of his legs, including acupuncture. He eventually
>> was able to stand but he was never able to walk, unfortunately, nor
>> did he regain control of his bladder. However, he lived for several
>> years and got around quite well, after being adopted by someone who
>> was able to care for him. His eventual death had nothing to do with
>> his spinal cord injury (he was also FIV positive).
>>
>> I just wanted to let you know that many cats do recover from spinal
>> injuries but even if they don't, cats can adapt to hind leg paralysis.
>> I hope very much that your vet is able to ascertain what is causing
>> your cat's problem and is able to treat it.
----------
To this I would like to add that there was another poster a while back
(can't remember many of the details, but it wasn't one of the regulars)
whose cat sustained some sort of a spinal cord injury. It took several
weeks, but the cat ultimately did have a complete recovery (on his own). So,
please try to keep your hopes up and keep us all updated.
Purrs for a complete recovery,
Best regards,
---Cindy S.