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View Full Version : Can you save by buying Advantage flea control for dogs and using smaller dosage for cats?


Garret Swayne
June 7th 07, 05:50 PM
I've been told Advantage Flea control has the same ingredients, whether it's
used for dogs or for cats. The only difference is that when you buy
Advantage for dogs, the measured single-application doses contain more
(because dogs are larger and require a larger dose). So if you have a
calibrated eyedropper to measure out the dosage exactly and information on
how big a dose to apply to your cat, theoretically you could buy a packaged
dose for a large dog and stretch it to several applications for your small
cat, couldn't you? Has anybody tried this, or or do you know of a site
where they tell you exactly how to do it?

-Garret Swayne
garret at garretswayne dot com

Karen R.
June 7th 07, 06:39 PM
Garret Swayne wrote the following on 6/7/2007 12:50 PM:
> I've been told Advantage Flea control has the same ingredients, whether it's
> used for dogs or for cats. The only difference is that when you buy
> Advantage for dogs, the measured single-application doses contain more
> (because dogs are larger and require a larger dose).

I do that, but I use a medicine syringe (no needle) instead of an
eyedropper. The amounts used are so small that it has to be calibrated by
tenths of a ML. One large dog tube does 5 large cats.

I find it easier to do this, as the amount squirts down so quickly and
with more force that I can do it in the approximately 1.5 seconds I have
before the cat takes off. :-)

I don't know how it holds up to storage once opened -- I got enough cats
to use up the tube.

Karen R.

cindys
June 7th 07, 07:00 PM
"Karen R." > wrote in message
ink.net...
>
> I don't know how it holds up to storage once opened -- I got enough cats
> to use up the tube.
-----------
Last year, we fostered a cat who arrived with fleas, so all of the (5) cats
in the family needed to be treated. The veterinarian gave me a tube of
Revolution for each cat. One of the cats was too quick for me, and I was
unable to treat her (after I had already snipped the top off the tube). I
went to try again later, and the Revolution had totally evaporated. So, I
think evaporation is the issue rather than a concern that the active
ingredient will go bad or deactivate when exposed to air.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Ken Knecht
June 7th 07, 07:15 PM
"Garret Swayne" > wrote in
hlink.net:

> I've been told Advantage Flea control has the same ingredients,
> whether it's used for dogs or for cats. The only difference is that
> when you buy Advantage for dogs, the measured single-application doses
> contain more (because dogs are larger and require a larger dose). So
> if you have a calibrated eyedropper to measure out the dosage exactly
> and information on how big a dose to apply to your cat, theoretically
> you could buy a packaged dose for a large dog and stretch it to
> several applications for your small cat, couldn't you? Has anybody
> tried this, or or do you know of a site where they tell you exactly
> how to do it?
>
> -Garret Swayne
> garret at garretswayne dot com
>
>

I buy the Advantage for large dogs size on-line. I squeeze a tube into a
small glass vial. Using a graduated dropper, after shaking the vial, I
draw out 0.8 ml, and apply that to the skin on the back of the cat's
neck. Been doing this with no problems for years. The stuff lasts many
months in the capped vial.

The cat does not appreciate it and I have to hide the dropper until I
have the cat in hand.

I bought the vial and the dropper - and other neat stuff - at American
Science and Surplus on line.




--
Untie the two knots to email me

Every silver lining has a cloud.

William Graham
June 7th 07, 11:08 PM
"cindys" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Karen R." > wrote in message
> ink.net...
> >
>> I don't know how it holds up to storage once opened -- I got enough cats
>> to use up the tube.
> -----------
> Last year, we fostered a cat who arrived with fleas, so all of the (5)
> cats in the family needed to be treated. The veterinarian gave me a tube
> of Revolution for each cat. One of the cats was too quick for me, and I
> was unable to treat her (after I had already snipped the top off the
> tube). I went to try again later, and the Revolution had totally
> evaporated. So, I think evaporation is the issue rather than a concern
> that the active ingredient will go bad or deactivate when exposed to air.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.
>
The lesson is: First catch the cat, then open the tube........

cindys
June 7th 07, 11:26 PM
"William Graham" > wrote in message
...
>
> "cindys" > wrote in message
> ...
>>
>> "Karen R." > wrote in message
>> ink.net...
>> >
>>> I don't know how it holds up to storage once opened -- I got enough cats
>>> to use up the tube.
>> -----------
>> Last year, we fostered a cat who arrived with fleas, so all of the (5)
>> cats in the family needed to be treated. The veterinarian gave me a tube
>> of Revolution for each cat. One of the cats was too quick for me, and I
>> was unable to treat her (after I had already snipped the top off the
>> tube). I went to try again later, and the Revolution had totally
>> evaporated. So, I think evaporation is the issue rather than a concern
>> that the active ingredient will go bad or deactivate when exposed to air.
>> Best regards,
>> ---Cindy S.
>>
> The lesson is: First catch the cat, then open the tube........
------------
The cat was caught, but as soon as I opened the tube, she caught a whiff of
it and went bonkers. She bit my husband (who was holding her) and ran out of
the room. (This is the first and only time the cat has ever bitten anyone).
She never did get the flea treatment (and I never saw a flea on her either).
I attribute this to the fact there were only a few fleas to begin with (and
only on the foster cat who had been kept separate from the other cats), the
other four cats were treated anyway (a couple of times each, just to be
sure), and the cat in question pretty much likes to stay in one particular
bedroom (which the foster cat did not enter). I got very lucky.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Veloise
June 8th 07, 01:07 AM
Cindy wrote:
> The cat was caught, but as soon as I opened the tube, she caught a whiff of
> it and went bonkers. She bit my husband (who was holding her) and ran out of
> the room. (This is the first and only time the cat has ever bitten anyone).
> She never did get the flea treatment (and I never saw a flea on her either).
> I attribute this to the fact there were only a few fleas to begin with (and
> only on the foster cat who had been kept separate from the other cats), the
> other four cats were treated anyway (a couple of times each, just to be
> sure), and the cat in question pretty much likes to stay in one particular
> bedroom (which the foster cat did not enter). I got very lucky.

Maybe she preferred the water treatment. B-A-T-H

--Karen D.

James
June 8th 07, 02:28 AM
On Jun 7, 8:07 pm, Veloise > wrote:
> Cindy wrote:
> > The cat was caught, but as soon as I opened the tube, she caught a whiff of
> > it and went bonkers. She bit my husband (who was holding her) and ran out of
> > the room. (This is the first and only time the cat has ever bitten anyone).
> > She never did get the flea treatment (and I never saw a flea on her either).
> > I attribute this to the fact there were only a few fleas to begin with (and
> > only on the foster cat who had been kept separate from the other cats), the
> > other four cats were treated anyway (a couple of times each, just to be
> > sure), and the cat in question pretty much likes to stay in one particular
> > bedroom (which the foster cat did not enter). I got very lucky.
>
> Maybe she preferred the water treatment. B-A-T-H
>
> --Karen D.


Does it sting or something? Why are cats afraid of it?

Matthew
June 8th 07, 02:35 AM
"James" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Jun 7, 8:07 pm, Veloise > wrote:
>> Cindy wrote:
>> > The cat was caught, but as soon as I opened the tube, she caught a
>> > whiff of
>> > it and went bonkers. She bit my husband (who was holding her) and ran
>> > out of
>> > the room. (This is the first and only time the cat has ever bitten
>> > anyone).
>> > She never did get the flea treatment (and I never saw a flea on her
>> > either).
>> > I attribute this to the fact there were only a few fleas to begin with
>> > (and
>> > only on the foster cat who had been kept separate from the other cats),
>> > the
>> > other four cats were treated anyway (a couple of times each, just to be
>> > sure), and the cat in question pretty much likes to stay in one
>> > particular
>> > bedroom (which the foster cat did not enter). I got very lucky.
>>
>> Maybe she preferred the water treatment. B-A-T-H
>>
>> --Karen D.
>
>
> Does it sting or something? Why are cats afraid of it?
>

The smell of it and the feel. It drives my Spirit nuts he goes completely
bonkers

-L.
June 8th 07, 12:32 PM
Garret Swayne wrote:
> I've been told Advantage Flea control has the same ingredients, whether it's
> used for dogs or for cats. The only difference is that when you buy
> Advantage for dogs, the measured single-application doses contain more
> (because dogs are larger and require a larger dose). So if you have a
> calibrated eyedropper to measure out the dosage exactly and information on
> how big a dose to apply to your cat, theoretically you could buy a packaged
> dose for a large dog and stretch it to several applications for your small
> cat, couldn't you? Has anybody tried this, or or do you know of a site
> where they tell you exactly how to do it?

Yes, you can - I do it all the time. I forget the dosage for cats,
but it's how ever much is in each tube made for cats (I think it's
0.8ml). Just check the dosage on the tube for cats, and remove that
much per cat from the larger package.

-L.

Garret Swayne
June 9th 07, 01:47 AM
Here's another question...Can you do this with Frontline Plus as well? I've
heard it's actually a better product than
Advantage, in that it works against ticks too. Can I buy the "large-dog"
product and dole out smaller "cat-sized" doses to my feline? Would anyone
know the dosage size?
-Garret

"-L." > wrote in message
oups.com...
> Garret Swayne wrote:
>> I've been told Advantage Flea control has the same ingredients, whether
>> it's
>> used for dogs or for cats. The only difference is that when you buy
>> Advantage for dogs, the measured single-application doses contain more
>> (because dogs are larger and require a larger dose). So if you have a
>> calibrated eyedropper to measure out the dosage exactly and information
>> on
>> how big a dose to apply to your cat, theoretically you could buy a
>> packaged
>> dose for a large dog and stretch it to several applications for your
>> small
>> cat, couldn't you? Has anybody tried this, or or do you know of a site
>> where they tell you exactly how to do it?
>
> Yes, you can - I do it all the time. I forget the dosage for cats,
> but it's how ever much is in each tube made for cats (I think it's
> 0.8ml). Just check the dosage on the tube for cats, and remove that
> much per cat from the larger package.
>
> -L.
>

Leanne
June 9th 07, 03:28 AM
I have been using Frontline Plus for several years. My vet suggested that we
get the one for large dogs as it is all of the same formula. I opened our
last plastic vial this evening and filled one syringe with 2 1/2 cc and a
second to 1 1/2 cc of the liquid. I just cap them off with the plastic caps
that come with the syringes. The dosage we use is .5 cc per month. A package
of three vials for a large dog lasts a long time. if you have a large herd
would make it reasonable.

Leanne

"Garret Swayne" > wrote in message
hlink.net...
> Here's another question...Can you do this with Frontline Plus as well?
> I've heard it's actually a better product than
> Advantage, in that it works against ticks too. Can I buy the "large-dog"
> product and dole out smaller "cat-sized" doses to my feline? Would anyone
> know the dosage size?
> -Garret
>
> "-L." > wrote in message
> oups.com...
>> Garret Swayne wrote:
>>> I've been told Advantage Flea control has the same ingredients, whether
>>> it's
>>> used for dogs or for cats. The only difference is that when you buy
>>> Advantage for dogs, the measured single-application doses contain more
>>> (because dogs are larger and require a larger dose). So if you have a
>>> calibrated eyedropper to measure out the dosage exactly and information
>>> on
>>> how big a dose to apply to your cat, theoretically you could buy a
>>> packaged
>>> dose for a large dog and stretch it to several applications for your
>>> small
>>> cat, couldn't you? Has anybody tried this, or or do you know of a site
>>> where they tell you exactly how to do it?
>>
>> Yes, you can - I do it all the time. I forget the dosage for cats,
>> but it's how ever much is in each tube made for cats (I think it's
>> 0.8ml). Just check the dosage on the tube for cats, and remove that
>> much per cat from the larger package.
>>
>> -L.
>>
>
>

Ted Davis
June 9th 07, 05:44 PM
On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 00:47:18 GMT, "Garret Swayne"
> wrote:

>Here's another question...Can you do this with Frontline Plus as well? I've
>heard it's actually a better product than
>Advantage, in that it works against ticks too. Can I buy the "large-dog"
>product and dole out smaller "cat-sized" doses to my feline? Would anyone
>know the dosage size?

I use Frontline Plus on my fifteen indoor/outdoor rural cats. I have
a severe tick issue due to all the wildlife and cattle in the area.
About twice a year I buy two or three six-packs of the largest dog
size from an Australian vendor (deadfleaz.com). Then I empty a tube
into a small glass bottle with a wide mouth and a tightly sealing lid.
I use 2 cc syringes to meter the doses: 0.5 cc for an average cat and
a bit more (about 0.7) for my two largest (and a bit less - maybe 0.35
or 0.4 cc for my two smallest). The biggest drawback is that the
numbers come off the syringes - I scratch the barrels at the two
dosage points and keep them visible by filling them with permanent
markers. Even counting shipping, this keeps the cost per cat per
month to around a US dollar, and keeps the fleas under almost complete
control, and the ticks to the point where for the first three weeks I
remove almost entirely dead ticks from the cats - they do bring in a
few live ones on the outside of their fur and these sometimes find me,
but I almost always feel them before they attach. Anyway, it's a good
thing that these are almost all cattle ticks, not deer ticks, even
though there is a large local deer population (even the deer have
almost exclusively cattle ticks).

I buy the bottles and syringes from <http://www.sciplus.com/>
(American Science and Surplus, and yes, there is a connection with
Ken's use of the same vendor).

--
T.E.D. ) Remove "gearbox.maem" to get real address - that one is dead

James
June 10th 07, 12:12 PM
On Jun 9, 12:44 pm, Ted Davis > wrote:
> On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 00:47:18 GMT, "Garret Swayne"
>
> > wrote:
> >Here's another question...Can you do this with Frontline Plus as well? I've
> >heard it's actually a better product than
> >Advantage, in that it works against ticks too. Can I buy the "large-dog"
> >product and dole out smaller "cat-sized" doses to my feline? Would anyone
> >know the dosage size?
>
> I use Frontline Plus on my fifteen indoor/outdoor rural cats. I have
> a severe tick issue due to all the wildlife and cattle in the area.
> About twice a year I buy two or three six-packs of the largest dog
> size from an Australian vendor (deadfleaz.com). Then I empty a tube
> into a small glass bottle with a wide mouth and a tightly sealing lid.
> I use 2 cc syringes to meter the doses: 0.5 cc for an average cat and
> a bit more (about 0.7) for my two largest (and a bit less - maybe 0.35
> or 0.4 cc for my two smallest). The biggest drawback is that the
> numbers come off the syringes - I scratch the barrels at the two
> dosage points and keep them visible by filling them with permanent
> markers. Even counting shipping, this keeps the cost per cat per
> month to around a US dollar, and keeps the fleas under almost complete
> control, and the ticks to the point where for the first three weeks I
> remove almost entirely dead ticks from the cats - they do bring in a
> few live ones on the outside of their fur and these sometimes find me,
> but I almost always feel them before they attach. Anyway, it's a good
> thing that these are almost all cattle ticks, not deer ticks, even
> though there is a large local deer population (even the deer have
> almost exclusively cattle ticks).
>
> I buy the bottles and syringes from <http://www.sciplus.com/>
> (American Science and Surplus, and yes, there is a connection with
> Ken's use of the same vendor).
>
> --
> T.E.D. ) Remove "gearbox.maem" to get real address - that one is dead

Does pulling of dead ticks usually leave a scar or scab?

Ted Davis
June 10th 07, 05:33 PM
On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 04:12:13 -0700, James >
wrote:

>On Jun 9, 12:44 pm, Ted Davis > wrote:
>> On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 00:47:18 GMT, "Garret Swayne"
>>
>> > wrote:
>> >Here's another question...Can you do this with Frontline Plus as well? I've
>> >heard it's actually a better product than
>> >Advantage, in that it works against ticks too. Can I buy the "large-dog"
>> >product and dole out smaller "cat-sized" doses to my feline? Would anyone
>> >know the dosage size?
>>
>> I use Frontline Plus on my fifteen indoor/outdoor rural cats. I have
>> a severe tick issue due to all the wildlife and cattle in the area.
>> About twice a year I buy two or three six-packs of the largest dog
>> size from an Australian vendor (deadfleaz.com). Then I empty a tube
>> into a small glass bottle with a wide mouth and a tightly sealing lid.
>> I use 2 cc syringes to meter the doses: 0.5 cc for an average cat and
>> a bit more (about 0.7) for my two largest (and a bit less - maybe 0.35
>> or 0.4 cc for my two smallest). The biggest drawback is that the
>> numbers come off the syringes - I scratch the barrels at the two
>> dosage points and keep them visible by filling them with permanent
>> markers. Even counting shipping, this keeps the cost per cat per
>> month to around a US dollar, and keeps the fleas under almost complete
>> control, and the ticks to the point where for the first three weeks I
>> remove almost entirely dead ticks from the cats - they do bring in a
>> few live ones on the outside of their fur and these sometimes find me,
>> but I almost always feel them before they attach. Anyway, it's a good
>> thing that these are almost all cattle ticks, not deer ticks, even
>> though there is a large local deer population (even the deer have
>> almost exclusively cattle ticks).
>>
>> I buy the bottles and syringes from <http://www.sciplus.com/>
>> (American Science and Surplus, and yes, there is a connection with
>> Ken's use of the same vendor).
>>
>> --
>> T.E.D. ) Remove "gearbox.maem" to get real address - that one is dead
>
>Does pulling of dead ticks usually leave a scar or scab?

Hard to tell through the fur, but I find them mostly by feel, and I
don't seem to keep going back to the same places. The cats don't seem
to have much of an allergic reaction to ticks, but I definitely do.

--
T.E.D. ) Remove "gearbox.maem" to get real address - that one is dead

Professor
June 11th 07, 05:03 AM
"Ted Davis" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun, 10 Jun 2007 04:12:13 -0700, James >
> wrote:
>>On Jun 9, 12:44 pm, Ted Davis > wrote:
>>> On Sat, 09 Jun 2007 00:47:18 GMT, "Garret Swayne"
>>> > wrote:
>>> >Here's another question...Can you do this with Frontline Plus as well?
>>> >I've
>>> >heard it's actually a better product than
>>> >Advantage, in that it works against ticks too. Can I buy the
>>> >"large-dog"
>>> >product and dole out smaller "cat-sized" doses to my feline? Would
>>> >anyone
>>> >know the dosage size?
>>>
>>> I use Frontline Plus on my fifteen indoor/outdoor rural cats. I have
>>> a severe tick issue due to all the wildlife and cattle in the area.
>>> About twice a year I buy two or three six-packs of the largest dog
>>> size from an Australian vendor (deadfleaz.com). Then I empty a tube
>>> into a small glass bottle with a wide mouth and a tightly sealing lid.
>>> I use 2 cc syringes to meter the doses: 0.5 cc for an average cat and
>>> a bit more (about 0.7) for my two largest (and a bit less - maybe 0.35
>>> or 0.4 cc for my two smallest). The biggest drawback is that the
>>> numbers come off the syringes - I scratch the barrels at the two
>>> dosage points and keep them visible by filling them with permanent
>>> markers. Even counting shipping, this keeps the cost per cat per
>>> month to around a US dollar, and keeps the fleas under almost complete
>>> control, and the ticks to the point where for the first three weeks I
>>> remove almost entirely dead ticks from the cats - they do bring in a
>>> few live ones on the outside of their fur and these sometimes find me,
>>> but I almost always feel them before they attach. Anyway, it's a good
>>> thing that these are almost all cattle ticks, not deer ticks, even
>>> though there is a large local deer population (even the deer have
>>> almost exclusively cattle ticks).
>>>
>>> I buy the bottles and syringes from <http://www.sciplus.com/>
>>> (American Science and Surplus, and yes, there is a connection with
>>> Ken's use of the same vendor).
>>>
>>> --
>>> T.E.D. ) Remove "gearbox.maem" to get real
>>> address - that one is dead
>>
>>Does pulling of dead ticks usually leave a scar or scab?
>
> Hard to tell through the fur, but I find them mostly by feel, and I
> don't seem to keep going back to the same places. The cats don't seem
> to have much of an allergic reaction to ticks, but I definitely do.

Never let your cat outside and you'll never have to pull any more ticks.

William Graham
June 11th 07, 08:46 AM
"Professor" > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
Never let your cat outside and you'll never have to pull any more ticks.
>
>
Pardon me, but pulling a few ticks is a small price to pay for
freedom.......

You would live a much safer life if you were confined to a padded cell,
too.........

Nicolaas Hawkins
June 11th 07, 09:37 AM
On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 00:46:37 -0700, William Graham >
wrote in >:

> "Professor" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
> Never let your cat outside and you'll never have to pull any more ticks.
>>
>>
> Pardon me, but pulling a few ticks is a small price to pay for
> freedom.......
>
> You would live a much safer life if you were confined to a padded cell,
> too.........

Sounds like a scheme...

--
Nicolaas.

2007 Pricelessware CD now available. 600Mb of the best of the best in
Freeware. E-Mail me for details.


.... Computers make it easier to do a lot of things - most of which didn't
really need to be done.

Ted Davis
June 11th 07, 01:45 PM
On Mon, 11 Jun 2007 04:03:53 GMT, "Professor" >
wrote:

>>>
>>>Does pulling of dead ticks usually leave a scar or scab?
>>
>> Hard to tell through the fur, but I find them mostly by feel, and I
>> don't seem to keep going back to the same places. The cats don't seem
>> to have much of an allergic reaction to ticks, but I definitely do.
>
>Never let your cat outside and you'll never have to pull any more ticks.
>

You try living with fifteen strictly indoor cats in about a thousand
square feet of space. Especially when a number of them originated as
barn cats.

--
T.E.D. )
Remove "gearbox.maem." from address - that one is dead

Professor
June 11th 07, 08:46 PM
"William Graham" > wrote in message
. ..
>
> "Professor" > wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>>
> Never let your cat outside and you'll never have to pull any more ticks.
>>
>>
> Pardon me, but pulling a few ticks is a small price to pay for
> freedom.......
>
> You would live a much safer life if you were confined to a padded cell,
> too.........

I have never let my retire show cats outside, they have no idea what they're
missing, and haver no desire to go out. Ticks can give your cat illnesses
that can kill, but obviously you don't care.

William Graham
June 11th 07, 09:48 PM
"Professor" > wrote in message news:uEhbi.7711>

I have never let my retire show cats outside, they have no idea what
they're
> missing, and haver no desire to go out. Ticks can give your cat illnesses
> that can kill, but obviously you don't care.
>
Well, it all depends on one's philosophy of life (and death) doesn't it? - I
have noticed that liberals think life is the most important thing there is,
and are willing to give up their, (and MY!) freedom for it any old time.
But to me, death is always waiting there in the wings, and it really
doesn't matter whether you live five minutes or 500 years....To the infinite
period of time that is (apparently) part of this universe, it doesn't
matter....What matters to me is the enjoyment one gets while one is here,
and not the extent of that brief period of time.
Perhaps your cats are happy, and I am quite willing to buy that. But
mine wouldn't be, because they were all "outside" cats to begin with. I
didn't go out and get any of them. They all just wandered in because they
liked the smell of my property, and the cut of my jib. They will stay for a
while, and then wander off, never to be seen (by me) again. - I have learned
to accept that, even though I will never be really comfortable with it. I
didn't design this universe.....I just learned to live in (and with) it.
Bill Graham, Salem, Oregon

Matthew
June 11th 07, 10:25 PM
Lets not start this debate again. It is getting old and tiresome. Everyone
has their opinion about this it has been going on for years. You are not
going to change the other person opinion all it is going to do is start a
bunch of BS. SO KNOCK IT OFF

William Graham
June 11th 07, 10:34 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> Lets not start this debate again. It is getting old and tiresome.
> Everyone has their opinion about this it has been going on for years. You
> are not going to change the other person opinion all it is going to do is
> start a bunch of BS. SO KNOCK IT OFF
>
So whose trying to "change the other person's opinion?" We each have our own
set of circumstances, and we each try (as best we can) to live within our
own set. I will discuss exactly what I feel like discussing, and if you
don't like it, then do the following: Message menu > block sender > click on
block and remove........
After all, I wouldn't want to be responsible for boring you to
death..........

Matthew
June 12th 07, 12:28 AM
"William Graham" >
< snipped for being boring>


Grow up

Nancy F
August 11th 07, 04:44 AM
All the time. And one of my cats is just barely 5 lbs so I measure her a
1/2 dose. I use an insulin syringe with the needle removed, draw up the
Advantage, part the cat's fur with the tip and apply it to the skin. My
cats are scratching less since I get more liquid on the skin than the fur!
Nancy F, SoCal

Garret Swayne wrote:
> I've been told Advantage Flea control has the same ingredients, whether it's
> used for dogs or for cats. The only difference is that when you buy
> Advantage for dogs, the measured single-application doses contain more
> (because dogs are larger and require a larger dose). So if you have a
> calibrated eyedropper to measure out the dosage exactly and information on
> how big a dose to apply to your cat, theoretically you could buy a packaged
> dose for a large dog and stretch it to several applications for your small
> cat, couldn't you? Has anybody tried this, or or do you know of a site
> where they tell you exactly how to do it?
>
> -Garret Swayne
> garret at garretswayne dot com
>
>