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Eddy Bentley
June 15th 07, 11:43 AM
Suddenly, just as this summer is beginning, my two three-year-old cats
have occasionally been "coughing".

It starts with one "cough", then the cat quickly crouches so that its
body is sort of close to and parallel with the floor, and then the
coughs continue. It's a similar position to the position cats adopt
when they are about to throw something up. However, they are not
throwing anything up. It also seems to be something to do with the
windpipe, as if there's some obstruction. Their collars are not tight -
you can get two fingers under them.

Is this a case of hairballs? Or what?

If it's hairballs, what do I do?

So far they've always recovered after a dozen coughs or so, but it is
happening once every couple of days, and clearly they're in a state of
discomfort while it occurs, so I think if there's something I can do to
stop it, then I should.

Eddy.

---MIKE---
June 15th 07, 12:35 PM
Go to the Vet. It could be asthma. Ike (RB) had this and the vet would
give him a prednisone shot which would stop the coughing for about four
months.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Buddy's Mom
June 15th 07, 10:19 PM
Sounds like a hairball that they aren't getting rid of. I use
Whiskers Temptation Treats for Hairballs and they work very well.

On Jun 15, 6:43?am, Eddy Bentley
> wrote:
> Suddenly, just as this summer is beginning, my two three-year-old cats
> have occasionally been "coughing".
>
> It starts with one "cough", then the cat quickly crouches so that its
> body is sort of close to and parallel with the floor, and then the
> coughs continue. It's a similar position to the position cats adopt
> when they are about to throw something up. However, they are not
> throwing anything up. It also seems to be something to do with the
> windpipe, as if there's some obstruction. Their collars are not tight -
> you can get two fingers under them.
>
> Is this a case of hairballs? Or what?
>
> If it's hairballs, what do I do?
>
> So far they've always recovered after a dozen coughs or so, but it is
> happening once every couple of days, and clearly they're in a state of
> discomfort while it occurs, so I think if there's something I can do to
> stop it, then I should.
>
> Eddy.

June 15th 07, 11:41 PM
Eddy Bentley > wrote:

>It also seems to be something to do with the
>windpipe, as if there's some obstruction. Their collars are not tight -
>you can get two fingers under them.

Do they extend their neck out straight to get air? As -MIKE- said it
may be asthma.

Lynne
June 16th 07, 02:34 AM
on Fri, 15 Jun 2007 10:43:44 GMT, Eddy Bentley
> wrote:

> Suddenly, just as this summer is beginning, my two three-year-old cats
> have occasionally been "coughing".
>
> It starts with one "cough", then the cat quickly crouches so that its
> body is sort of close to and parallel with the floor, and then the
> coughs continue. It's a similar position to the position cats adopt
> when they are about to throw something up. However, they are not
> throwing anything up. It also seems to be something to do with the
> windpipe, as if there's some obstruction. Their collars are not tight -
> you can get two fingers under them.
>
> Is this a case of hairballs? Or what?
>
> If it's hairballs, what do I do?
>
> So far they've always recovered after a dozen coughs or so, but it is
> happening once every couple of days, and clearly they're in a state of
> discomfort while it occurs, so I think if there's something I can do to
> stop it, then I should.
>
> Eddy.

Sounds like hairballs to me. Give them a hairball paste (follow the label
directions) and also start brushing them so they don't ingest so much hair.
I like the Furminator for brushing, and so do my cats, though YMMV.


--
Lynne

June 16th 07, 03:27 AM
Eddy Bentley > wrote:

>Suddenly, just as this summer is beginning, my two three-year-old cats
>have occasionally been "coughing".
>
>It starts with one "cough", then the cat quickly crouches so that its
>body is sort of close to and parallel with the floor, and then the
>coughs continue. It's a similar position to the position cats adopt
>when they are about to throw something up. However, they are not
>throwing anything up. It also seems to be something to do with the
>windpipe, as if there's some obstruction. Their collars are not tight -
>you can get two fingers under them.
>
>Is this a case of hairballs? Or what?
>
>If it's hairballs, what do I do?
>
>So far they've always recovered after a dozen coughs or so, but it is
>happening once every couple of days, and clearly they're in a state of
>discomfort while it occurs, so I think if there's something I can do to
>stop it, then I should.
>
>Eddy.
>
>
This was posted the other day by Cheryl of a cat having an asthma
attack.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kG5vBaT21_c

Also see this one...
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vkebV2tv_cs&mode=related&search=>

Anyone who thinks their cat merely has a hairball that won't come up
should watch those videos, especially the second one and get their cat
to a vet for further advice.

-mhd

Sherry
June 16th 07, 05:51 AM
On Jun 15, 5:43 am, Eddy Bentley
> wrote:
> Suddenly, just as this summer is beginning, my two three-year-old cats
> have occasionally been "coughing".
>
> It starts with one "cough", then the cat quickly crouches so that its
> body is sort of close to and parallel with the floor, and then the
> coughs continue. It's a similar position to the position cats adopt
> when they are about to throw something up. However, they are not
> throwing anything up. It also seems to be something to do with the
> windpipe, as if there's some obstruction. Their collars are not tight -
> you can get two fingers under them.
>
> Is this a case of hairballs? Or what?
>
> If it's hairballs, what do I do?
>
> So far they've always recovered after a dozen coughs or so, but it is
> happening once every couple of days, and clearly they're in a state of
> discomfort while it occurs, so I think if there's something I can do to
> stop it, then I should.
>
> Eddy.

I think this warrants a trip to the vet. I had taken in a stray a
while back who coughed like this, and
he suddenly died. We had an autopsy done, and his lungs were full of
fluid. (the ER vet suspected FIP)
It could be a hairball, but if it's not coming up he needs help. Cats
with asthmas cough. Cats with
heartworm cough.
I don't mean to scare you, but I wish I had taken it more seriously
with the stray cat.

Sherry

Lynne
June 16th 07, 03:33 PM
on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 04:51:00 GMT, Sherry > wrote:

> I think this warrants a trip to the vet. I had taken in a stray a
> while back who coughed like this, and
> he suddenly died. We had an autopsy done, and his lungs were full of
> fluid. (the ER vet suspected FIP)
> It could be a hairball, but if it's not coming up he needs help. Cats
> with asthmas cough. Cats with
> heartworm cough.
> I don't mean to scare you, but I wish I had taken it more seriously
> with the stray cat.

After reading this, I concur. A trip to the vet is definitely warranted.
Hopefully it is hairballs, but it's better to be safe than sorry.

--
Lynne

Eddy Bentley
June 17th 07, 09:18 PM
Thanks to everyone for all the advice.

And thanks for reminding me there's a product out there for hairballs!

I got some and after three days' of it, there's been a significant
improvement and he seems a happier boy. I think I'll administer for
another day . . . and from now on brush that fur more regularly!

Eddy.