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sheelagh
June 16th 07, 04:13 PM
I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
here...(Yet!)

http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/1181915114303570.xml&coll=8

Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
S;o)

Suzanne[_2_]
June 16th 07, 04:32 PM
On Jun 16, 8:13 am, sheelagh > wrote:
> I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> here...(Yet!)
>
> http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> S;o)

Sheelagh,

I live on Vancouver Island and during our first visit to the vet we
were advised that the bats here are high incident carriers of rabies.
As we live by the water, we did not want to take any chances with our
little Houdini... Our vet indicated that one of his cats had brought
a bat present in one day...

Suki was fine with her rabies shot - slept a lot the day after - but
bounced right back the next day.

Suzanne

sheelagh
June 16th 07, 04:48 PM
On 16 Jun, 16:32, Suzanne > wrote:
> On Jun 16, 8:13 am, sheelagh > wrote:
>
> > I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> > carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> > here...(Yet!)
>
> >http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> > Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> > S;o)
>
> Sheelagh,
>
> I live on Vancouver Island and during our first visit to the vet we
> were advised that the bats here are high incident carriers of rabies.
> As we live by the water, we did not want to take any chances with our
> little Houdini... Our vet indicated that one of his cats had brought
> a bat present in one day...
>
> Suki was fine with her rabies shot - slept a lot the day after - but
> bounced right back the next day.
>
> Suzanne

I had no idea they carried rabies!

If this is the case, I would imagine bats everywhere would carry it,
or is this the wrong assumption to make? The reason I ask is because
we have bats in the UK, but no one has ever warned me that we needed
to be vigilant for this problem.

I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly. If you have bats with
rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?

Interesting.
Thanks for that, I am going to go and search now
S;o)

Gail
June 16th 07, 05:09 PM
Yes, bats in the US can carry rabies, as can all mammals. I believe you do
not have rabies in the UK (in bats or any other mammals).
Gil
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> here...(Yet!)
>
> http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/1181915114303570.xml&coll=8
>
> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> S;o)
>

sheelagh
June 16th 07, 06:06 PM
On 16 Jun, 17:09, "Gail" > wrote:
> Yes, bats in the US can carry rabies, as can all mammals. I believe you do
> not have rabies in the UK (in bats or any other mammals).
> Gil"sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
>
>
> >I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> > carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> > here...(Yet!)
>
> >http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> > Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> > S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thanks, I couldn't find anything either. I wonder if it is merely a
question of time until we do. Not a nice thought really, but it would
certainly make all of us think very differently if this were the case.
Normally we let our cats out when and where they wish to. however, if
this were to happen, it would change things irrevocably.
S;o)

Alison[_2_]
June 16th 07, 06:47 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> here...(Yet!)
>
> http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/1181915114303570.xml&coll=8
>
> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> S;o)
>

There have been very few incidences of rabies in the UK but a few years
ago a man died in Scotland after being bitten by a bat :(

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2509375.stm

*A man has died after contracting Britain's first case of rabies for 100
years, hospital bosses have confirmed.
David McRae, a 56-year-old conservationist from Guthrie, Angus, Scotland,
failed to recover from European Bat Lyssavirus (EBL), a type of rabies
found in several northern European countries.

Mr McRae, who was licensed to handle bats, was bitten by one of the
creatures on at least one occasion. *

Some people have died in the UK after being bitten abroad and there have
been a couple of cases of dogs developing rabies after their six months
quarrantine.


Alison
http://catinfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/
http://doginfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/
http://petinfolinks.mysite.orange.co.uk

sheelagh
June 16th 07, 07:02 PM
On 16 Jun, 18:47, "Alison" > wrote:
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
> >I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> > carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> > here...(Yet!)
>
> >http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> > Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> > S;o)
>
> There have been very few incidences of rabies in the UK but a few years
> ago a man died in Scotland after being bitten by a bat :(
>
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2509375.stm
>
> *A man has died after contracting Britain's first case of rabies for 100
> years, hospital bosses have confirmed.
> David McRae, a 56-year-old conservationist from Guthrie, Angus, Scotland,
> failed to recover from European Bat Lyssavirus (EBL), a type of rabies
> found in several northern European countries.
>
> Mr McRae, who was licensed to handle bats, was bitten by one of the
> creatures on at least one occasion. *
>
> Some people have died in the UK after being bitten abroad and there have
> been a couple of cases of dogs developing rabies after their six months
> quarrantine.
>
> Alisonhttp://catinfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/http://doginfolinks.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk/http://petinfolinks.mysite.orange.co.uk

That was rather shocking!
I really do feel for those affected by this.
I don't know all that much about rabies, other than it is not a very
pleasant disease &somewhere @ the back of my memory, is telling me
that it causes a fear of water?
By the look of this report this is something that should be far more
in the spotlight over here. I am assuming that most people are not
very knowledgeable because we don't, or rather haven't had to deal
with it here as a common problem.

I think it is high time we did though!!
If anyone has anything interesting to post regarding this issue,
please do & we can spread the word.
The more people that become aware of this problem, the more people
will try to protect their animals. Thank you for posting that Alison,
S;o)

Fred G. Mackey[_2_]
June 16th 07, 07:29 PM
sheelagh wrote:
> On 16 Jun, 16:32, Suzanne > wrote:
>
>>On Jun 16, 8:13 am, sheelagh > wrote:
>>
>>

> I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
> they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly.

They also eat lots of insects - most species do anyway.


> If you have bats with
> rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
> swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?
>
> Interesting.
> Thanks for that, I am going to go and search now
> S;o)
>

Lilah Morgan
June 16th 07, 07:59 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
ups.com...

> That was rather shocking!
> I really do feel for those affected by this.
> I don't know all that much about rabies, other than it is not a very
> pleasant disease &somewhere @ the back of my memory, is telling me
> that it causes a fear of water?

I haven't done much research on it myself(I just make sure the pets get
vaccinated), but I believe affected animals do get an aversion to water,
hence rabies also being referred to as hydrophobia(I might be wrong on this,
feel free to correct if I'm wrong)

rhino
June 16th 07, 09:14 PM
"Lilah Morgan" > wrote in message
nk.net...
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
> ups.com...
>
>> That was rather shocking!
>> I really do feel for those affected by this.
>> I don't know all that much about rabies, other than it is not a very
>> pleasant disease &somewhere @ the back of my memory, is telling me
>> that it causes a fear of water?
>
> I haven't done much research on it myself(I just make sure the pets get
> vaccinated), but I believe affected animals do get an aversion to water,
> hence rabies also being referred to as hydrophobia(I might be wrong on
> this,
> feel free to correct if I'm wrong)
>
Actually, I'm pretty sure that hydrophobia is a _symptom_ of rabies and is
not the same thing as the disease itself.

I wouldn't be surprised if hydrophobia is a symptom of other diseases that
are not related to rabies. But I have no experience or training in this
matter so I'm really just speculating that other diseases can also call
hydrophobia.

--
Rhino

sheelagh
June 16th 07, 09:46 PM
On 16 Jun, 19:59, "Lilah Morgan" > wrote:
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
> > That was rather shocking!
> > I really do feel for those affected by this.
> > I don't know all that much about rabies, other than it is not a very
> > pleasant disease &somewhere @ the back of my memory, is telling me
> > that it causes a fear of water?
>
> I haven't done much research on it myself(I just make sure the pets get
> vaccinated), but I believe affected animals do get an aversion to water,
> hence rabies also being referred to as hydrophobia(I might be wrong on this,
> feel free to correct if I'm wrong)

If there is no known cure for rabies, how does the vaccine work & what
does it protect the animal who has received rabies shots for?
The reason that I ask you this is because if you can't cure it, does
this mean that the shot reduces the possibility of catching it?

Hydrophobia does seem to be a side effect;what are the most general
effect that comes to light that would make you think that your cat/
dog is affected by it?
(ie: You don't always see your pet bitten, so how would you know that
they are affected, & by that time, what could you do?)
Thanks in advance,
S;o)

22brix
June 16th 07, 11:02 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> On 16 Jun, 19:59, "Lilah Morgan" > wrote:
>> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>>
>> ups.com...
>>
>> > That was rather shocking!
>> > I really do feel for those affected by this.
>> > I don't know all that much about rabies, other than it is not a very
>> > pleasant disease &somewhere @ the back of my memory, is telling me
>> > that it causes a fear of water?
>>
>> I haven't done much research on it myself(I just make sure the pets get
>> vaccinated), but I believe affected animals do get an aversion to water,
>> hence rabies also being referred to as hydrophobia(I might be wrong on
>> this,
>> feel free to correct if I'm wrong)
>
> If there is no known cure for rabies, how does the vaccine work & what
> does it protect the animal who has received rabies shots for?
> The reason that I ask you this is because if you can't cure it, does
> this mean that the shot reduces the possibility of catching it?

The vaccination prevents the animal from getting rabies--a killed virus (the
vaccine) is injected into the animal which then produces antibodies to
rabies. Rabies can be prevented but not cured. If a person is exposed to
rabies, as long as it's started early, there is a post-exposure vaccine
regimen that can prevent development of rabies but it has to started within
a few days. Once an animal (or human) develops symptoms of rabies, there is
no cure--it is almost universally fatal.

>
> Hydrophobia does seem to be a side effect;what are the most general
> effect that comes to light that would make you think that your cat/
> dog is affected by it?
> (ie: You don't always see your pet bitten, so how would you know that
> they are affected, & by that time, what could you do?)
> Thanks in advance,
> S;o)
>

Hydrophobia is another name for rabies, referring to later stages of the
disease--the animal develops paralysis of the throat and jaws and cannot
swallow.

Here are a couple of links about rabies symptoms.

http://www.animalhealthchannel.com/rabies/symptoms.shtml

http://dogs.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Rabies_Symptoms

HTH, Bonnie

bookie
June 17th 07, 01:28 AM
On 16 Jun, 16:13, sheelagh > wrote:
> I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> here...(Yet!)
>
> http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> S;o)

saw something on telly a while back about some girl in america who was
bitten by a rabid bat (whilst in church would you believe! how's that
for 'testing your faith'?)and is one of the few people to have
survived rabies. One of those channel 4 cutting edge programmes or
maybe on 5ive, they do lots of stuff on medical freaks.
I cannot remember what the treatment was but it was completely new and
a bit of a longshot on the part fo the doctor who treated her, and
when it was tried again on some korean chap who caught rabies the
treatment failed.

basically it can passed from any warm blooded animal to another by
exchanging blood, saliva i think, and usually when the infected animal
bites another.
if i find a link to the story of the girl i will post it, but i know
she was left very badly scarred by it and had to relearn to walk and
talk and stuff as it really attacked her nervous system quite badly.

emily

22brix
June 17th 07, 01:53 AM
"bookie" > wrote in message
ps.com...
> On 16 Jun, 16:13, sheelagh > wrote:
>> I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
>> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
>> here...(Yet!)
>>
>> http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>>
>> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
>> S;o)
>
> saw something on telly a while back about some girl in america who was
> bitten by a rabid bat (whilst in church would you believe! how's that
> for 'testing your faith'?)and is one of the few people to have
> survived rabies. One of those channel 4 cutting edge programmes or
> maybe on 5ive, they do lots of stuff on medical freaks.
> I cannot remember what the treatment was but it was completely new and
> a bit of a longshot on the part fo the doctor who treated her, and
> when it was tried again on some korean chap who caught rabies the
> treatment failed.
>
> basically it can passed from any warm blooded animal to another by
> exchanging blood, saliva i think, and usually when the infected animal
> bites another.
> if i find a link to the story of the girl i will post it, but i know
> she was left very badly scarred by it and had to relearn to walk and
> talk and stuff as it really attacked her nervous system quite badly.
>
> emily
>


Pretty amazing story . .

http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2005-12-24-rabiessurvivor_x.htm

Bonnie

Lynne
June 17th 07, 03:52 AM
on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 15:48:52 GMT, sheelagh >
wrote:

> I had no idea they carried rabies!
>
> If this is the case, I would imagine bats everywhere would carry it,
> or is this the wrong assumption to make? The reason I ask is because
> we have bats in the UK, but no one has ever warned me that we needed
> to be vigilant for this problem.
>
> I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
> they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly. If you have bats with
> rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
> swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?

I don't know how far bats will travel, but I do know that rabies was
eradicated in England a long time ago, so I imagine bats don't pop over
from France. I don't think you have anything to worry about.

Now I suppose a rabid animal could sneak on a ship or onto someone's yacht
or even onto a plane and land in England, but I imagine the port
authorities are quite vigilent about that possibility. It'd be interesting
to look into what measures are taken to keep rabies out of England.

--
Lynne

Lynne
June 17th 07, 03:56 AM
on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 20:14:52 GMT, "rhino"
> wrote:

> Actually, I'm pretty sure that hydrophobia is a _symptom_ of rabies
> and is not the same thing as the disease itself.

you are correct. I once encountered what appeared to be a rabid dog when I
was alone in the woods. His eyes were bloodshot, he was frothing at the
mouth and he looked like hell, very skinny and scraggly, with his head
lilting to one side. Thankfully I was right on the bank of the Shenandoah
River and hopped in. He wouldn't come near the water, but he wanted to get
to me. I started screaming and screaming (my friends were in a canoe down
the river). They came back and fired a shotgun and the dog took off. Talk
about scary.

--
Lynne

Sherry
June 17th 07, 06:44 AM
On Jun 16, 12:06 pm, sheelagh > wrote:
> On 16 Jun, 17:09, "Gail" > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Yes, bats in the US can carry rabies, as can all mammals. I believe you do
> > not have rabies in the UK (in bats or any other mammals).
> > Gil"sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
> > >I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> > > carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> > > here...(Yet!)
>
> > >http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> > > Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> > > S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> Thanks, I couldn't find anything either. I wonder if it is merely a
> question of time until we do. Not a nice thought really, but it would
> certainly make all of us think very differently if this were the case.
> Normally we let our cats out when and where they wish to. however, if
> this were to happen, it would change things irrevocably.
> S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
Not really. You'd just vaccinate them. Really, it's nothing to worry
excessively about, people just
need to know the signs of an infected animal and to be viligant about
vaccinating any
pet that goes outdoors. . The actual
number of human deaths from rabies over the last 30 years is very low.
Like average one
person per year...and that's the entire United States. IIRC, bats are
the most common carrier.
The only rabies incident we ever had was from a skunk. You can tell
immediately. Animals
are way too aggressive and usually are foaming at the mouth and seem
disoriented.

Sherry

Patty
June 17th 07, 02:25 PM
On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 08:13:36 -0700, sheelagh wrote:

> I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> here...(Yet!)
>
> http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/1181915114303570.xml&coll=8
>
> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> S;o)

We have a number of bats here where I live in Michigan. I've always had my
cats vaccinated for rabies. Not just because of bats, but we have lots of
raccoons, etc. which can also carry rabies. Rusty's due this year for his
update in August, and he will get it since he's a regular "bat-catcher".
As far as I'm concerned, it's just not worth the risk of losing a cat to
possible rabies, since they can't even tell if they've been infected until
their dead.

Patty

bookie
June 17th 07, 05:39 PM
On 17 Jun, 01:53, "22brix" > wrote:
> "bookie" > wrote in message
>
> ps.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 16 Jun, 16:13, sheelagh > wrote:
> >> I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> >> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> >> here...(Yet!)
>
> >>http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> >> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> >> S;o)
>
> > saw something on telly a while back about some girl in america who was
> > bitten by a rabid bat (whilst in church would you believe! how's that
> > for 'testing your faith'?)and is one of the few people to have
> > survived rabies. One of those channel 4 cutting edge programmes or
> > maybe on 5ive, they do lots of stuff on medical freaks.
> > I cannot remember what the treatment was but it was completely new and
> > a bit of a longshot on the part fo the doctor who treated her, and
> > when it was tried again on some korean chap who caught rabies the
> > treatment failed.
>
> > basically it can passed from any warm blooded animal to another by
> > exchanging blood, saliva i think, and usually when the infected animal
> > bites another.
> > if i find a link to the story of the girl i will post it, but i know
> > she was left very badly scarred by it and had to relearn to walk and
> > talk and stuff as it really attacked her nervous system quite badly.
>
> > emily
>
> Pretty amazing story . .
>
> http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2005-12-24-rabiessurvivor_x.htm
>
> Bonnie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

yes that's the one, they basically left her body to deal with it, and
put her in an induced coma to shut her brain down whilst her body
worked overtime to get rid of the disease, think she is the only one
who has really survived by using this treatment, or rather lack of
treatment.

rabies was supposedly eradicated form the british isles at the end of
the 19th century although every now and then and animals dies after a
showing symptoms similar to those brought on by rabies and everyone
starts to panic. it is this determination to keep rabies out which is
the reason for the strict quarantine laws regarding bring animlas into
britain, ie cats and dogs must be held in quarantine for 6 months and
the owner has to pay for the priviledge which can cost several
thousand of pounds. alternatively they can get their animals
vaccinated and carry a 'pet passport' which I think are easier to get
these days and show that the animlas has been vaccinated against stuff
like rabies etc

bookie

sheelagh
June 17th 07, 06:33 PM
On 17 Jun, 03:52, Lynne > wrote:
> on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 15:48:52 GMT, sheelagh >
> wrote:
>
> > I had no idea they carried rabies!
>
> > If this is the case, I would imagine bats everywhere would carry it,
> > or is this the wrong assumption to make? The reason I ask is because
> > we have bats in the UK, but no one has ever warned me that we needed
> > to be vigilant for this problem.
>
> > I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
> > they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly. If you have bats with
> > rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
> > swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?
>
> I don't know how far bats will travel, but I do know that rabies was
> eradicated in England a long time ago, so I imagine bats don't pop over
> from France. I don't think you have anything to worry about.
>
> Now I suppose a rabid animal could sneak on a ship or onto someone's yacht
> or even onto a plane and land in England, but I imagine the port
> authorities are quite vigilent about that possibility. It'd be interesting
> to look into what measures are taken to keep rabies out of England.
>
> --
> Lynne


That's what I thought too Lynne, until I read Alison's post regarding
this chap who had been working for some few years with Bats. I can't
say that I am shocked, but I am surprised that we didn't get a lot
more coverage on this story.

That's Big Brother for you!

As Bookie points out, we do have a very strict regime regarding
rabies. However, not everyone is honest enough to do things by the
rules, or prepared to spend thousands of pounds to have their cats
quarantined...

In fact some people just can't be bothered period...!!
This is exactly how we will import Rabies in the future, if we don't
already have it...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2509375.stm

Would I be right in assuming that Rats could carry Rabies too?
If this is the case, I am shocked that we don't already have a
pandemic already. I would love to think that we wouldn't, but that
would be naive of me.

You asked about measures taken to stop rabies from entering this
country...

As far as I am aware, there are just normal checks when people cross
the Chanel from Europe & France, Holland Germany ect. You are given 2
choices.. something to declare, or nothing to declare. It is quite
easy to get a pet passport here. But there are some people who simply
feel that their Pooch or cat doesn't need one & that their Snuggles
would never get it, if you take my meaning?

It's really up to the owner to be honest enough. Customs do have
sniffer dogs, but that wouldn't prevent the odd fool hiding a dog,
cat, or any other animal locked in the back of a van, or a caravan
either. If people are determined to break the rules, then I guess it
is inevitable that it will reach us one day, in the near future.
S;o)

Patty
June 17th 07, 07:03 PM
On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 09:39:38 -0700, bookie wrote:

> rabies was supposedly eradicated form the british isles at the end of
> the 19th century although every now and then and animals dies after a
> showing symptoms similar to those brought on by rabies and everyone
> starts to panic. it is this determination to keep rabies out which is
> the reason for the strict quarantine laws regarding bring animlas into
> britain, ie cats and dogs must be held in quarantine for 6 months and
> the owner has to pay for the priviledge which can cost several
> thousand of pounds. alternatively they can get their animals
> vaccinated and carry a 'pet passport' which I think are easier to get
> these days and show that the animlas has been vaccinated against stuff
> like rabies etc
>
> bookie

My cats have always been vaccinated for rabies starting when they were
first old enough to get vaccines. Because of the situation we have here
for a number of "wild" animals, and my cats have always been
indoor/outdoor, I felt better knowing that they had some protection should
they come across a rabid animal and be bitten. So, does that mean if I
showed proof of vaccination my cat would then not have to be quarantined?
I always wondered about that.

Here, all dogs MUST be licensed and vaccinated, it is required by law
although there is not a real enforcement measure being taken. In some
larger cities and areas, I suppose there is, but in the small town that I
live, I suppose a person could have an unlicensed, unvaccinated dog,
although the "tags" are supposed to be on its collar in view. Also, vets
give you a certificate showing the date of last vaccination and when the
next "booster shot" is needed, which is every three years.

Patty

sheelagh
June 17th 07, 07:44 PM
On 17 Jun, 19:03, Patty > wrote:
> On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 09:39:38 -0700, bookie wrote:
> > rabies was supposedly eradicated form the British isles at the end of
> > the 19th century although every now and then and animals dies after a
> > showing symptoms similar to those brought on by rabies and everyone
> > starts to panic. it is this determination to keep rabies out which is
> > the reason for the strict quarantine laws regarding bring animals into
> > britain, ie cats and dogs must be held in quarantine for 6 months and
> > the owner has to pay for the privileged which can cost several
> > thousand of pounds. alternatively they can get their animals
> > vaccinated and carry a 'pet passport' which I think are easier to get
> > these days and show that the animals has been vaccinated against stuff
> > like rabies etc
>
> > bookie
>
> My cats have always been vaccinated for rabies starting when they were
> first old enough to get vaccines. Because of the situation we have here
> for a number of "wild" animals, and my cats have always been
> indoor/outdoor, I felt better knowing that they had some protection should
> they come across a rabid animal and be bitten. So, does that mean if I
> showed proof of vaccination my cat would then not have to be quarantined?
> I always wondered about that.
>
> Here, all dogs MUST be licensed and vaccinated, it is required by law
> although there is not a real enforcement measure being taken. In some
> larger cities and areas, I suppose there is, but in the small town that I
> live, I suppose a person could have an unlicensed, unvaccinated dog,
> although the "tags" are supposed to be on its collar in view. Also, vets
> give you a certificate showing the date of last vaccination and when the
> next "booster shot" is needed, which is every three years.
>
> Patty

Please don't take my word on this, but I would assume that if your cat
was all injected & up to date, I see no reason why you wouldn't be
allowed to.

I have a feeling that most of this all hinges on wehther or not you
have a Pet- Passport. I'm not sure how much they cost, but as long as
you do have one, you can come and go with your pet as you please as
far as I am aware. I don't know anyone personally who has a pet
passport, but I do know that as long as it is current & valid, you can
take your pet almost anywhere. I also believe that the passport has to
be updated every year once booster inoculations are done, & certified
by your vet.

I will look up pet passports for you, & get back to you about this
one.
I have a feeling that you can go anywhere in the world & take your cat
with you, but whether you are allowed back in again without quarantine
is open to debate...

We "used to have to buy a dog licence years ago," but more recently,
they have scraped that law. I have wondered why they did this for
several years- It's time to do a bit of homework on this one.

I think it might not be a bad idea to think about injecting for
rabies, but only if there was good reason to... or enough worry to
warrant it. Bookie seems to be quite knowledgeable in this one. Have
you any idea why Bookie?
S;o)

sheelagh
June 17th 07, 07:48 PM
On 17 Jun, 01:28, bookie > wrote:
> On 16 Jun, 16:13, sheelagh > wrote:
>
> > I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> > carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> > here...(Yet!)
>
> >http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> > Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> > S;o)
>
> saw something on telly a while back about some girl in america who was
> bitten by a rabid bat (whilst in church would you believe! how's that
> for 'testing your faith'?)and is one of the few people to have
> survived rabies. One of those channel 4 cutting edge programmes or
> maybe on 5ive, they do lots of stuff on medical freaks.
> I cannot remember what the treatment was but it was completely new and
> a bit of a longshot on the part fo the doctor who treated her, and
> when it was tried again on some korean chap who caught rabies the
> treatment failed.
>
> basically it can passed from any warm blooded animal to another by
> exchanging blood, saliva i think, and usually when the infected animal
> bites another.
> if i find a link to the story of the girl i will post it, but i know
> she was left very badly scarred by it and had to relearn to walk and
> talk and stuff as it really attacked her nervous system quite badly.
>
> emily

I think I saw it too. It was on channel four.
Good program raising interesting questions as well as exposing issues
that are controversial too.
S;o)

sheelagh
June 17th 07, 07:58 PM
On 17 Jun, 19:03, Patty > wrote:
> On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 09:39:38 -0700, bookie wrote:
> > rabies was supposedly eradicated form the british isles at the end of
> > the 19th century although every now and then and animals dies after a
> > showing symptoms similar to those brought on by rabies and everyone
> > starts to panic. it is this determination to keep rabies out which is
> > the reason for the strict quarantine laws regarding bring animlas into
> > britain, ie cats and dogs must be held in quarantine for 6 months and
> > the owner has to pay for the priviledge which can cost several
> > thousand of pounds. alternatively they can get their animals
> > vaccinated and carry a 'pet passport' which I think are easier to get
> > these days and show that the animlas has been vaccinated against stuff
> > like rabies etc
>
> > bookie
>
> My cats have always been vaccinated for rabies starting when they were
> first old enough to get vaccines. Because of the situation we have here
> for a number of "wild" animals, and my cats have always been
> indoor/outdoor, I felt better knowing that they had some protection should
> they come across a rabid animal and be bitten. So, does that mean if I
> showed proof of vaccination my cat would then not have to be quarantined?
> I always wondered about that.
>
> Here, all dogs MUST be licensed and vaccinated, it is required by law
> although there is not a real enforcement measure being taken. In some
> larger cities and areas, I suppose there is, but in the small town that I
> live, I suppose a person could have an unlicensed, unvaccinated dog,
> although the "tags" are supposed to be on its collar in view. Also, vets
> give you a certificate showing the date of last vaccination and when the
> next "booster shot" is needed, which is every three years.
>
> Patty

Patty, here is the information regarding Pets Passports that I said I
would try and find out for you with regard to rabies. I have given you
a couple of links to show you a couple of differing opinions with
regard to the rules and pet passports as well....
The first link is to do with passport for your pets, & the second one
is for people wanting to take their pets abroad, & others who wish to
bring their pets here too.

PASSPORTS
http://www.parksidevet.e-vet.com/petpassport.htm

GOVERNMENT RULES REGARDING RABIES
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/AdvancedSearch/Searchresults/index.htm?fullText=rabies

S;o)

22brix
June 17th 07, 08:02 PM
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On 17 Jun, 03:52, Lynne > wrote:
>> on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 15:48:52 GMT, sheelagh
>> >
>> wrote:
>>
>> > I had no idea they carried rabies!
>>
>> > If this is the case, I would imagine bats everywhere would carry it,
>> > or is this the wrong assumption to make? The reason I ask is because
>> > we have bats in the UK, but no one has ever warned me that we needed
>> > to be vigilant for this problem.
>>
>> > I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
>> > they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly. If you have bats with
>> > rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
>> > swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?
>>
>> I don't know how far bats will travel, but I do know that rabies was
>> eradicated in England a long time ago, so I imagine bats don't pop over
>> from France. I don't think you have anything to worry about.
>>
>> Now I suppose a rabid animal could sneak on a ship or onto someone's
>> yacht
>> or even onto a plane and land in England, but I imagine the port
>> authorities are quite vigilent about that possibility. It'd be
>> interesting
>> to look into what measures are taken to keep rabies out of England.
>>
>> --
>> Lynne
>
>
> That's what I thought too Lynne, until I read Alison's post regarding
> this chap who had been working for some few years with Bats. I can't
> say that I am shocked, but I am surprised that we didn't get a lot
> more coverage on this story.
>
> That's Big Brother for you!
>
> As Bookie points out, we do have a very strict regime regarding
> rabies. However, not everyone is honest enough to do things by the
> rules, or prepared to spend thousands of pounds to have their cats
> quarantined...
>
> In fact some people just can't be bothered period...!!
> This is exactly how we will import Rabies in the future, if we don't
> already have it...
>
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2509375.stm

This person would have been at higher risk for rabies due to the fact he had
prolonged contact with bats and he had actually been bitten by a bat. It's
really really tragic what happened to this person but it sounds like a very
unusual occurance. Unless you're handling bats (which most people shouldn't
be!) you probably don't have to worry too much about it.


This was also a different genotype of rabies (European Bat Lyssavirus 2)
than the rabies found in the US and many other parts of the world and is
fairly specific to certain species of bats. The type of rabies ("classic"
rabies--genotype 1) in the US is not as host specific and can be carried by
other mammals.

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/330/7490/491

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyssavirus


>
> Would I be right in assuming that Rats could carry Rabies too?
> If this is the case, I am shocked that we don't already have a
> pandemic already. I would love to think that we wouldn't, but that
> would be naive of me.


Rodents are considered to be very very low risk for rabies.


Bonnie

sheelagh
June 17th 07, 08:14 PM
On 17 Jun, 14:25, Patty > wrote:
> On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 08:13:36 -0700, sheelagh wrote:
> > I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
> > carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
> > here...(Yet!)
>
> >http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>
> > Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
> > S;o)
>
> We have a number of bats here where I live in Michigan. I've always had my
> cats vaccinated for rabies. Not just because of bats, but we have lots of
> raccoons, etc. which can also carry rabies. Rusty's due this year for his
> update in August, and he will get it since he's a regular "bat-catcher".
> As far as I'm concerned, it's just not worth the risk of losing a cat to
> possible rabies, since they can't even tell if they've been infected until
> their dead.
>
> Patty

This might be a better site to go on. I read the other one through, I
realised it didn't have as much to say as I anticipated it might have.
Never mind...!!

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/quarantine/index.htm
S;o)

sheelagh
June 17th 07, 08:51 PM
On 17 Jun, 20:02, "22brix" > wrote:
> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 17 Jun, 03:52, Lynne > wrote:
> >> on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 15:48:52 GMT, sheelagh
> >> >
> >> wrote:
>
> >> > I had no idea they carried rabies!
>
> >> > If this is the case, I would imagine bats everywhere would carry it,
> >> > or is this the wrong assumption to make? The reason I ask is because
> >> > we have bats in the UK, but no one has ever warned me that we needed
> >> > to be vigilant for this problem.
>
> >> > I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
> >> > they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly. If you have bats with
> >> > rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
> >> > swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?
>
> >> I don't know how far bats will travel, but I do know that rabies was
> >> eradicated in England a long time ago, so I imagine bats don't pop over
> >> from France. I don't think you have anything to worry about.
>
> >> Now I suppose a rabid animal could sneak on a ship or onto someone's
> >> yacht
> >> or even onto a plane and land in England, but I imagine the port
> >> authorities are quite vigilent about that possibility. It'd be
> >> interesting
> >> to look into what measures are taken to keep rabies out of England.
>
> >> --
> >> Lynne
>
> > That's what I thought too Lynne, until I read Alison's post regarding
> > this chap who had been working for some few years with Bats. I can't
> > say that I am shocked, but I am surprised that we didn't get a lot
> > more coverage on this story.
>
> > That's Big Brother for you!
>
> > As Bookie points out, we do have a very strict regime regarding
> > rabies. However, not everyone is honest enough to do things by the
> > rules, or prepared to spend thousands of pounds to have their cats
> > quarantined...
>
> > In fact some people just can't be bothered period...!!
> > This is exactly how we will import Rabies in the future, if we don't
> > already have it...
>
> >http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2509375.stm
>
> This person would have been at higher risk for rabies due to the fact he had
> prolonged contact with bats and he had actually been bitten by a bat. It's
> really really tragic what happened to this person but it sounds like a very
> unusual occurance. Unless you're handling bats (which most people shouldn't
> be!) you probably don't have to worry too much about it.
>
> This was also a different genotype of rabies (European Bat Lyssavirus 2)
> than the rabies found in the US and many other parts of the world and is
> fairly specific to certain species of bats. The type of rabies ("classic"
> rabies--genotype 1) in the US is not as host specific and can be carried by
> other mammals.
>
> http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/330/7490/491
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyssavirus
>
>
>
> > Would I be right in assuming that Rats could carry Rabies too?
> > If this is the case, I am shocked that we don't already have a
> > pandemic already. I would love to think that we wouldn't, but that
> > would be naive of me.
>
> Rodents are considered to be very very low risk for rabies.
>
> Bonnie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thanks Bonnie, That was really helpful.

I know it is wrong, but, because we don't have to worry about Rabies,
we don't worry at all.....

It is the wrong attitude. I think it would do us all good to learn a
bit more.
No good ever comes from ignorance, does it..?!!
S:o)
PS: Hows life treating you all?
Well I hope!

Patty
June 17th 07, 09:17 PM
On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 12:14:38 -0700, sheelagh wrote:

> On 17 Jun, 14:25, Patty > wrote:
>> On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 08:13:36 -0700, sheelagh wrote:
>>> I found this story rather surprising. I have never heard of bats
>>> carrying rabies before now, but then again, we don't have rabies
>>> here...(Yet!)
>>
>>>http://www.mlive.com/news/chronicle/index.ssf?/base/news-11/118191511...
>>
>>> Is this a common problem, or a one off incident?
>>> S;o)
>>
>> We have a number of bats here where I live in Michigan. I've always had my
>> cats vaccinated for rabies. Not just because of bats, but we have lots of
>> raccoons, etc. which can also carry rabies. Rusty's due this year for his
>> update in August, and he will get it since he's a regular "bat-catcher".
>> As far as I'm concerned, it's just not worth the risk of losing a cat to
>> possible rabies, since they can't even tell if they've been infected until
>> their dead.
>>
>> Patty
>
> This might be a better site to go on. I read the other one through, I
> realised it didn't have as much to say as I anticipated it might have.
> Never mind...!!
>
> http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/quarantine/index.htm
> S;o)

Thanks, sheelagh, that is very informative.

Patty

22brix
June 17th 07, 09:51 PM
0
"sheelagh" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> On 17 Jun, 20:02, "22brix" > wrote:
>> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>>
>> oups.com...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > On 17 Jun, 03:52, Lynne > wrote:
>> >> on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 15:48:52 GMT, sheelagh
>> >> >
>> >> wrote:
>>
>> >> > I had no idea they carried rabies!
>>
>> >> > If this is the case, I would imagine bats everywhere would carry it,
>> >> > or is this the wrong assumption to make? The reason I ask is because
>> >> > we have bats in the UK, but no one has ever warned me that we needed
>> >> > to be vigilant for this problem.
>>
>> >> > I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
>> >> > they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly. If you have bats with
>> >> > rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
>> >> > swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?
>>
>> >> I don't know how far bats will travel, but I do know that rabies was
>> >> eradicated in England a long time ago, so I imagine bats don't pop
>> >> over
>> >> from France. I don't think you have anything to worry about.
>>
>> >> Now I suppose a rabid animal could sneak on a ship or onto someone's
>> >> yacht
>> >> or even onto a plane and land in England, but I imagine the port
>> >> authorities are quite vigilent about that possibility. It'd be
>> >> interesting
>> >> to look into what measures are taken to keep rabies out of England.
>>
>> >> --
>> >> Lynne
>>
>> > That's what I thought too Lynne, until I read Alison's post regarding
>> > this chap who had been working for some few years with Bats. I can't
>> > say that I am shocked, but I am surprised that we didn't get a lot
>> > more coverage on this story.
>>
>> > That's Big Brother for you!
>>
>> > As Bookie points out, we do have a very strict regime regarding
>> > rabies. However, not everyone is honest enough to do things by the
>> > rules, or prepared to spend thousands of pounds to have their cats
>> > quarantined...
>>
>> > In fact some people just can't be bothered period...!!
>> > This is exactly how we will import Rabies in the future, if we don't
>> > already have it...
>>
>> >http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2509375.stm
>>
>> This person would have been at higher risk for rabies due to the fact he
>> had
>> prolonged contact with bats and he had actually been bitten by a bat.
>> It's
>> really really tragic what happened to this person but it sounds like a
>> very
>> unusual occurance. Unless you're handling bats (which most people
>> shouldn't
>> be!) you probably don't have to worry too much about it.
>>
>> This was also a different genotype of rabies (European Bat Lyssavirus 2)
>> than the rabies found in the US and many other parts of the world and is
>> fairly specific to certain species of bats. The type of rabies
>> ("classic"
>> rabies--genotype 1) in the US is not as host specific and can be carried
>> by
>> other mammals.
>>
>> http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/330/7490/491
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyssavirus
>>
>>
>>
>> > Would I be right in assuming that Rats could carry Rabies too?
>> > If this is the case, I am shocked that we don't already have a
>> > pandemic already. I would love to think that we wouldn't, but that
>> > would be naive of me.
>>
>> Rodents are considered to be very very low risk for rabies.
>>
>> Bonnie- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> Thanks Bonnie, That was really helpful.
>
> I know it is wrong, but, because we don't have to worry about Rabies,
> we don't worry at all.....
>
> It is the wrong attitude. I think it would do us all good to learn a
> bit more.

I think the big thing about this tragedy is that the man acquired rabies
from "local" bats--in other words this form of rabies is already in Great
Britain. So far it's found only in certain species of bats and it seems to
be present at a very low level. Best advice--don't handle bats, especially
if they seem sick or are flying around during the daytime. If exposed seek
medical attention right away.


> No good ever comes from ignorance, does it..?!!
> S:o)
> PS: Hows life treating you all?
> Well I hope!
>
Tortle is fat and sassy--she's gained over 1 1/2 lbs since she came from
the hospital and now weighs about 8 1/2 lbs! I don't have to give her
fluids any more unless she becomes dehydrated. She's periodically
terrorizing Sophie and Clover (two of my other cats), both of whom weigh
about 2 pounds more than she does! She chases them, screaming, down the
hallway. It was more peaceful when she was sick! She's also more
affectionate. She has a funny half meow, half purr "mmrrraghhh" sound she
makes when I pick her up. I'm so pleased with her progress!

Bonnie

bookie
June 18th 07, 03:05 AM
On 17 Jun, 19:44, sheelagh > wrote:
> On 17 Jun, 19:03, Patty > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 09:39:38 -0700, bookie wrote:
> > > rabies was supposedly eradicated form the British isles at the end of
> > > the 19th century although every now and then and animals dies after a
> > > showing symptoms similar to those brought on by rabies and everyone
> > > starts to panic. it is this determination to keep rabies out which is
> > > the reason for the strict quarantine laws regarding bring animals into
> > > britain, ie cats and dogs must be held in quarantine for 6 months and
> > > the owner has to pay for the privileged which can cost several
> > > thousand of pounds. alternatively they can get their animals
> > > vaccinated and carry a 'pet passport' which I think are easier to get
> > > these days and show that the animals has been vaccinated against stuff
> > > like rabies etc
>
> > > bookie
>
> > My cats have always been vaccinated for rabies starting when they were
> > first old enough to get vaccines. Because of the situation we have here
> > for a number of "wild" animals, and my cats have always been
> > indoor/outdoor, I felt better knowing that they had some protection should
> > they come across a rabid animal and be bitten. So, does that mean if I
> > showed proof of vaccination my cat would then not have to be quarantined?
> > I always wondered about that.
>
> > Here, all dogs MUST be licensed and vaccinated, it is required by law
> > although there is not a real enforcement measure being taken. In some
> > larger cities and areas, I suppose there is, but in the small town that I
> > live, I suppose a person could have an unlicensed, unvaccinated dog,
> > although the "tags" are supposed to be on its collar in view. Also, vets
> > give you a certificate showing the date of last vaccination and when the
> > next "booster shot" is needed, which is every three years.
>
> > Patty
>
> Please don't take my word on this, but I would assume that if your cat
> was all injected & up to date, I see no reason why you wouldn't be
> allowed to.
>
> I have a feeling that most of this all hinges on wehther or not you
> have a Pet- Passport. I'm not sure how much they cost, but as long as
> you do have one, you can come and go with your pet as you please as
> far as I am aware. I don't know anyone personally who has a pet
> passport, but I do know that as long as it is current & valid, you can
> take your pet almost anywhere. I also believe that the passport has to
> be updated every year once booster inoculations are done, & certified
> by your vet.
>
> I will look up pet passports for you, & get back to you about this
> one.
> I have a feeling that you can go anywhere in the world & take your cat
> with you, but whether you are allowed back in again without quarantine
> is open to debate...
>
> We "used to have to buy a dog licence years ago," but more recently,
> they have scraped that law. I have wondered why they did this for
> several years- It's time to do a bit of homework on this one.
>
> I think it might not be a bad idea to think about injecting for
> rabies, but only if there was good reason to... or enough worry to
> warrant it. Bookie seems to be quite knowledgeable in this one. Have
> you any idea why Bookie?
> S;o)- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

what, you mean "do i have any idea why i am so knowledgeable about
this topic"? as far as i was aware i was not knowledgeable in the
slightest, no more than your average person in the street or pet owner/
slave.

anyway, back to pet passports etc, I don;t knwo much about them, i
think you have to go to your vet and get the relevant injections up to
date for you animal and get the ecrtifictaes and then maybe send them
off with some form or other (probably available at your local post
office, if it hasn;t been closed down aleady like ours) to some
government office that deals with that sort of thing, dunno which one
though, DEFRA maybe? go to www.gov.uk.org and see whether it has any
relevant links there on how to go about gettign one for your dog or
cat.

i just know a few people whose animals (couple of dog owners and one
cat owner) whose pets have them but never really been that bothered to
ask much more abuot them because i am unlikely to go abroad much as
can;t afford it, or if i did i wouldn;t want to inflict foreign travel
on my furry companions. I have heard too many horror stories of cats
getting out of containers at airports and going missing thank to
cretinous baggage handlers throwing them around like they were just
any old package and that puts me right off. The only way i would
consider taking my cats away with me would be to another destination
in England (greatest country on the planet btw) or somewhere not to
far across the channel where I could transport them with me by car so
i could keep them with me at all times, eg cross channel ferry. Any
further than that might freak them out and it woudl be no holiday for
them woudl it?

If i had a dog i would go further with it as i think they get less
freaked by journeys and see them as an adventure, but again i would
only go a far as I go go by car and ferry, would never trust my
beloved animals to dip**** baggage handlers or have them go in the
hold of a plane.

bookie

Lis
June 18th 07, 07:25 PM
On Jun 17, 2:44 pm, sheelagh > wrote:

<snip>

> I think it might not be a bad idea to think about injecting for
> rabies, but only if there was good reason to... or enough worry to
> warrant it. Bookie seems to be quite knowledgeable in this one. Have
> you any idea why Bookie?

You have a very, very low risk of rabies, and there are risks
associated with vaccines, too. It's not like here in North America,
where we have a much, much higher incidence of rabies in many more
species of wildlife--not just some relatively isolated bat
populations, but raccoons and skunks and other kinds of wildlife that
frequent the cities almost as much as they do the more rural areas.

As long as you don't have rabies in wildlife populations pets are
likely to encounter, I wouldn't be too quick to rush to routine rabies
vaccination. It's different, of course, if you want to travel with
your pets, or if rabies does move into the more common forms of
wildlife.

Lis

sheelagh
June 19th 07, 04:04 PM
On 17 Jun, 21:51, "22brix" > wrote:
> 0"sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> ups.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 17 Jun, 20:02, "22brix" > wrote:
> >> "sheelagh" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
> >> > On 17 Jun, 03:52, Lynne > wrote:
> >> >> on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 15:48:52 GMT, sheelagh
> >> >> >
> >> >> wrote:
>
> >> >> > I had no idea they carried rabies!
>
> >> >> > If this is the case, I would imagine bats everywhere would carry it,
> >> >> > or is this the wrong assumption to make? The reason I ask is because
> >> >> > we have bats in the UK, but no one has ever warned me that we needed
> >> >> > to be vigilant for this problem.
>
> >> >> > I have to admit that I know hardly anything about Bats, other than
> >> >> > they are nocturnal, work with sonar & fly. If you have bats with
> >> >> > rabies, then surely with bats in France where there is rabies, could
> >> >> > swim that channel & it would be a threat to us too?
>
> >> >> I don't know how far bats will travel, but I do know that rabies was
> >> >> eradicated in England a long time ago, so I imagine bats don't pop
> >> >> over
> >> >> from France. I don't think you have anything to worry about.
>
> >> >> Now I suppose a rabid animal could sneak on a ship or onto someone's
> >> >> yacht
> >> >> or even onto a plane and land in England, but I imagine the port
> >> >> authorities are quite vigilent about that possibility. It'd be
> >> >> interesting
> >> >> to look into what measures are taken to keep rabies out of England.
>
> >> >> --
> >> >> Lynne
>
> >> > That's what I thought too Lynne, until I read Alison's post regarding
> >> > this chap who had been working for some few years with Bats. I can't
> >> > say that I am shocked, but I am surprised that we didn't get a lot
> >> > more coverage on this story.
>
> >> > That's Big Brother for you!
>
> >> > As Bookie points out, we do have a very strict regime regarding
> >> > rabies. However, not everyone is honest enough to do things by the
> >> > rules, or prepared to spend thousands of pounds to have their cats
> >> > quarantined...
>
> >> > In fact some people just can't be bothered period...!!
> >> > This is exactly how we will import Rabies in the future, if we don't
> >> > already have it...
>
> >> >http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/2509375.stm
>
> >> This person would have been at higher risk for rabies due to the fact he
> >> had
> >> prolonged contact with bats and he had actually been bitten by a bat.
> >> It's
> >> really really tragic what happened to this person but it sounds like a
> >> very
> >> unusual occurance. Unless you're handling bats (which most people
> >> shouldn't
> >> be!) you probably don't have to worry too much about it.
>
> >> This was also a different genotype of rabies (European Bat Lyssavirus 2)
> >> than the rabies found in the US and many other parts of the world and is
> >> fairly specific to certain species of bats. The type of rabies
> >> ("classic"
> >> rabies--genotype 1) in the US is not as host specific and can be carried
> >> by
> >> other mammals.
>
> >>http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/330/7490/491
>
> >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyssavirus
>
> >> > Would I be right in assuming that Rats could carry Rabies too?
> >> > If this is the case, I am shocked that we don't already have a
> >> > pandemic already. I would love to think that we wouldn't, but that
> >> > would be naive of me.
>
> >> Rodents are considered to be very very low risk for rabies.
>
> >> Bonnie- Hide quoted text -
>
> >> - Show quoted text -
>
> > Thanks Bonnie, That was really helpful.
>
> > I know it is wrong, but, because we don't have to worry about Rabies,
> > we don't worry at all.....
>
> > It is the wrong attitude. I think it would do us all good to learn a
> > bit more.
>
> I think the big thing about this tragedy is that the man acquired rabies
> from "local" bats--in other words this form of rabies is already in Great
> Britain. So far it's found only in certain species of bats and it seems to
> be present at a very low level. Best advice--don't handle bats, especially
> if they seem sick or are flying around during the daytime. If exposed seek
> medical attention right away.
>
> > No good ever comes from ignorance, does it..?!!
> > S:o)
> > PS: Hows life treating you all?
> > Well I hope!
>
> Tortle is fat and sassy--she's gained over 1 1/2 lbs since she came from
> the hospital and now weighs about 8 1/2 lbs! I don't have to give her
> fluids any more unless she becomes dehydrated. She's periodically
> terrorizing Sophie and Clover (two of my other cats), both of whom weigh
> about 2 pounds more than she does! She chases them, screaming, down the
> hallway. It was more peaceful when she was sick! She's also more
> affectionate. She has a funny half meow, half purr "mmrrraghhh" sound she
> makes when I pick her up. I'm so pleased with her progress!
>
> Bonnie- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

So am I bonnie, I am absolutely delighted to hear all of this news. It
is fantastic. She sounds almost back to her naughty little self again,
LOL...
The fact that she is terrorising both Clover &Sophie is her reminding
them of her place in the hierarchy once again, ( all be it @ a few
pounds lighter, which makes her slightly faster & harder to catch her
he he;o)
Screaming is for you of course, just to let you know that she is back
on top of things & requires your assistance less and less each
day...except when it is time for cuddles & leg weaves you
understand....
Perhaps she was quieter before now, but I bet you wouldn't have it any
other way, would you?

This is wonderful news indeed. Please give her a scritch from us all
here if you will?
Many thanks,
Sheelagh
PS: Many thanks for the link. It was ever so interesting to read.

sheelagh
June 19th 07, 04:25 PM
On 17 Jun, 03:56, Lynne > wrote:
> on Sat, 16 Jun 2007 20:14:52 GMT, "rhino"
>
> > wrote:
> > Actually, I'm pretty sure that hydrophobia is a _symptom_ of rabies
> > and is not the same thing as the disease itself.
>
> you are correct. I once encountered what appeared to be a rabid dog when I
> was alone in the woods. His eyes were bloodshot, he was frothing at the
> mouth and he looked like hell, very skinny and scraggly, with his head
> lilting to one side. Thankfully I was right on the bank of the Shenandoah
> River and hopped in. He wouldn't come near the water, but he wanted to get
> to me. I started screaming and screaming (my friends were in a canoe down
> the river). They came back and fired a shotgun and the dog took off. Talk
> about scary.
>
> --
> Lynne

Yikes, I would have been frightened silly!!
You were very lucky that there was the river around to avert him, &
even more lucky to see someone who had a gun to fire the warning shot
too....
It sounds like a terrible disease. Not one that you would allow a poor
creature to endure. I would presume that if animal control come
across them that they would either put them to sleep or shoot them?

In the UK, I think that we are very lucky not to have rabies.
However, I am pessimistic about the outlook, because people here
really don't know how serious rabies is, so they have no concept of
the danger they run by bringing their pets back to the UK after a stay
in Europe where it is entirely possible that their pets can be
affected.

I feel that this is a topic that should be subject to information
awareness campaigns. If more people really understood the risk they
are taking, then they would be far less likely to take risks with
their beloved pets. I say this in the sense of a misguided person
rescuing a dog or a cat abroad, then smuggling them back into this
country. To find out then, would be to find out far too late.

Lynne, you mused on a few ways that people could bend/ignore the rules
regarding bringing infected animals from abroad. You were right to
think of boats simply docking, also bringing them over on a ferry,
from other countries, & hiding them from full view & by going through
nothing to declare.

Another way was brought to my attention yesterday, because I was
talking to someone about this issue, & they told me that one of the
best ways, is to bring them in by private aeroplanes. We have a small
runway around 5 miles away, & most weekends, the owners of those
crafts go to France ect, then fly back @ the end of the weekends,
smuggling contraband, because they are never checked there by
customs.
This made me think how easy it would be to bring animals back too, if
they were offered the right money of course!
A horrifying thought.
S;o)

Lynne
June 19th 07, 11:35 PM
on Tue, 19 Jun 2007 15:25:16 GMT, sheelagh
> wrote:

> Yikes, I would have been frightened silly!!
> You were very lucky that there was the river around to avert him, &
> even more lucky to see someone who had a gun to fire the warning shot
> too....
> It sounds like a terrible disease. Not one that you would allow a poor
> creature to endure. I would presume that if animal control come
> across them that they would either put them to sleep or shoot them?

That dog was near the end of his life, no doubt. Had we been more than
just kids (I was 16 at the time) we probably would have ended his misery
for him. We did hear several shots about an hour later from the
direction the dog ran off to, so maybe a farmer or fisherman dispatched
him. I hope so... that poor creature was insane at that point. I was
very lucky that I was between him and the River. My friends found my
screaming quite amusing for some damn reason and even made up a song for
me, LOL.

> In the UK, I think that we are very lucky not to have rabies.
> However, I am pessimistic about the outlook, because people here
> really don't know how serious rabies is, so they have no concept of
> the danger they run by bringing their pets back to the UK after a stay
> in Europe where it is entirely possible that their pets can be
> affected.

I don't hear of very many cases of domestic animals being infected with
rabies here in the US because pets in responsible homes are always
vaccinated. If rabies is a problem in Europe, I would expect they take
the same precautions (but don't know). It is illegal in every state in
the US to NOT have your pets vaccinated for rabies, though of course
there are people who do not take their animals to the vet. Those animals
are at risk of both catching and spreading rabies, but the risk has a lot
to do with location. Some states have a much worse rabies problem than
others, but I still mostly hear about rabies in wildlife. In most
states, if not all, if a dog or cat bites someone and the owner cannot
show proof of a current rabies vaccination, they risk having their pet
killed so its head can be sent to the CDC to test for rabies. Some
states will quarantine and observe the offending animal for signs of
rabies, which has a very predictable pattern. No responsible pet owner
is going to risk the former.

I debated about getting Levi vaccinated for rabies due to his FHV status
and the fact that he's an indoor kitty, but the above sobering thought
crossed my mind and I rushed him to the vet for his shot. Also, there is
a small but real risk of bats getting into the house through the chimney
or attic and I would hate for any of my animals to not be protected.

> Another way was brought to my attention yesterday, because I was
> talking to someone about this issue, & they told me that one of the
> best ways, is to bring them in by private aeroplanes. We have a small
> runway around 5 miles away, & most weekends, the owners of those
> crafts go to France ect, then fly back @ the end of the weekends,
> smuggling contraband, because they are never checked there by
> customs.
> This made me think how easy it would be to bring animals back too, if
> they were offered the right money of course!
> A horrifying thought.

I wouldn't worry too much. These people love their pets and don't want
them to be in quarentine. They are dumbasses for breaking the law, but
it's doubtful their pets have rabies.

--
Lynne

sheelagh
July 5th 07, 10:26 PM
On 5 Jul, 20:47, Aleks A.-Lessmann <[email protected]
consulting.com> wrote:
> On Sat, 16 Jun 2007 22:44:24 -0700, Sherry wrote:
> >Not really. You'd just vaccinate them. Really, it's nothing to worry
> >excessively about, people just
>
> And there are vaccination-by-bait programs all over the zones in Europe
> were there is still rabies. We were on the brink of eradicating rabies
> in Europe a couple of years ago, but overoptimistic people thought they
> could stop taking precautions against rabies, therefore it's spreading
> slightly.
>
> Regards
> Aleks

> And there are vaccination-by-bait programs all over the zones in Europe
> were there is still rabies. We were on the brink of eradicating rabies
> in Europe a couple of years ago, but overoptimistic people thought they
> could stop taking precautions against rabies, therefore it's spreading
> slightly.

That is just a terrible shame. Which countries ( if you know) are
using these methods of bait & treating programs?
The reason I would like to know is because I have decided that this is
something I would like to try & follow up with. I am more than
surprised that we don't have it in the UK
(other than a few isolated incidents such as the one I cited in this
post to start with)
some people really do believe that their cat/dog/pet would never be
infected, therefore they think nothing of flouting the law regarding
the import of live animals without quarantine. We have pet passports
now, so there really is no excuse, yet people still take that chance.
I simply don't understand why?
Sheelagh