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June 24th 07, 03:16 AM
I understand that one advantage of wet food for cats is that the moisture
in it guarantees that the cat gets plenty of water, which is good for the
urinary system.

I put lots of water in the bowl with the dry food each time I feed my cats,
and they lap up all the water as they eat the kibble. They are probably
getting more water this way than when I fed them wet food. So I'm
beginning to think there are no real reasons to continue with the wet food
(which is way more expensive, messy, and inconvenient).

Am I missing something? Are there other health benefits to canned food?

(I feed my two 11 year old neutered, male, indoor-only cats Science Diet
Senior dry food and Science Diet Senior canned food -- but I don't want to
get into a discussion about brands right now. I simply mention this as
background for my question about canned vs dry.)

Thanks.

JEP

cindys
June 24th 07, 04:09 AM
> wrote in message
.103...
>I understand that one advantage of wet food for cats is that the moisture
> in it guarantees that the cat gets plenty of water, which is good for the
> urinary system.
>
> I put lots of water in the bowl with the dry food each time I feed my
> cats,
> and they lap up all the water as they eat the kibble. They are probably
> getting more water this way than when I fed them wet food. So I'm
> beginning to think there are no real reasons to continue with the wet food
> (which is way more expensive, messy, and inconvenient).

From what I have read (I don't know that there is a way to measure this), no
matter how much water you think your cats are drinking, it is still less
than the amount they would derive from canned cat food. My CRF (chronic
renal failure) kitty was drinking plenty of water (when he was eating dry
food). With CRF, they are compelled to drink, and he was still dehydrated.
With canned cat food, his BUN has actually returned to being within normal
limits, and his creatinine, while still abnormal, is closer to normal than
before. This week, my vet told me he did not need any subcu fluids.

> Am I missing something? Are there other health benefits to canned food?

Fewer carbohydrates. I know from personal experience that the high
carbohydrate content of dry food can lend itself to diabetes. Within a
couple of weeks of switching my diabetic cat to canned food, his blood sugar
returned to normal, and he no longer required insulin. Also, cats are
obligate carnivores. It is unnatural for them to exist on cereal.

>
> (I feed my two 11 year old neutered, male, indoor-only cats Science Diet
> Senior dry food and Science Diet Senior canned food -- but I don't want to
> get into a discussion about brands right now. I simply mention this as
> background for my question about canned vs dry.)

My cats got fat on Iams Weight Managment dry cat food.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

June 24th 07, 04:49 AM
"cindys" > wrote in
:

> Fewer carbohydrates. I know from personal experience that the high
> carbohydrate content of dry food can lend itself to diabetes. Within a
> couple of weeks of switching my diabetic cat to canned food, his blood
> sugar returned to normal, and he no longer required insulin.

Thanks for letting me know that.

cindys
June 24th 07, 05:42 AM
> wrote in message
.103...
> "cindys" > wrote in
> :
>
>> Fewer carbohydrates. I know from personal experience that the high
>> carbohydrate content of dry food can lend itself to diabetes. Within a
>> couple of weeks of switching my diabetic cat to canned food, his blood
>> sugar returned to normal, and he no longer required insulin.
>
> Thanks for letting me know that.
--------
In all fairness, my understanding is that the insulin itself played a role
in putting the diabetes into remission but the lower carbohydrate content of
the canned food is playing a role in keeping it there. He did lose several
pounds once he was off the Iams Weight Management. I switched him to a diet
of canned cat food and Purina OM - overweight management dry. So, he was
still getting some dry cat food, but once he was on the canned, he ate much
less of the dry. The return to a normal blood glucose cannot be explained
only by his weight loss because his blood glucose was back to normal within
a couple of weeks, but it took considerably longer for him to lose the 2 or
3 pounds that he needed to lose. All of this happened about a year ago, and
his blood glucose continues to be normal.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Buddy's Mom
June 24th 07, 10:58 AM
I agree with Cindy. I recently had the vet tell me that new studies
have revealed that the dry food causes diabetes and overweight cats.
In the wild, cats eat mice, birds, etc. Items that have plenty of
moisture in them and no carbs. Why doesn't someone make canned mice?!

On Jun 24, 12:42?am, "cindys" > wrote:
> > wrote in message
>
> .103...> "cindys" > wrote in
> :
>
> >> Fewer carbohydrates. I know from personal experience that the high
> >> carbohydrate content of dry food can lend itself to diabetes. Within a
> >> couple of weeks of switching my diabetic cat to canned food, his blood
> >> sugar returned to normal, and he no longer required insulin.
>
> > Thanks for letting me know that.
>
> --------
> In all fairness, my understanding is that the insulin itself played a role
> in putting the diabetes into remission but the lower carbohydrate content of
> the canned food is playing a role in keeping it there. He did lose several
> pounds once he was off the Iams Weight Management. I switched him to a diet
> of canned cat food and Purina OM - overweight management dry. So, he was
> still getting some dry cat food, but once he was on the canned, he ate much
> less of the dry. The return to a normal blood glucose cannot be explained
> only by his weight loss because his blood glucose was back to normal within
> a couple of weeks, but it took considerably longer for him to lose the 2 or
> 3 pounds that he needed to lose. All of this happened about a year ago, and
> his blood glucose continues to be normal.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.

cindys
June 24th 07, 01:04 PM
"Buddy's Mom" > wrote in message
ups.com...
>I agree with Cindy. I recently had the vet tell me that new studies
> have revealed that the dry food causes diabetes and overweight cats.
> In the wild, cats eat mice, birds, etc. Items that have plenty of
> moisture in them and no carbs. Why doesn't someone make canned mice?!
--------
I have read in the past (on this newsgroup) that is has been tried, but the
odor was totally horrendous and there was no repeat business.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

Rene S.
June 24th 07, 06:10 PM
> Am I missing something? Are there other health benefits to canned food?

In addition to the good points already made here, I know from
experience that cats fed canned (or raw) food metabolize it better and
are able to maintain a healthy weigh.

cybercat
June 24th 07, 06:20 PM
"Rene S." > wrote in message
ups.com...
>
>> Am I missing something? Are there other health benefits to canned food?
>
> In addition to the good points already made here, I know from
> experience that cats fed canned (or raw) food metabolize it better and
> are able to maintain a healthy weigh.
>

I also think that not just "less carbs" helps them--more complete protein is
good for them. That is what my vet said when she looked at Boo after I had
switched her to all-canned and she lost 9 lbs. She used to have dandruff
(she is a tuxedo) and just frumpy looking fur, too. Not now. She is sleek
and shiny.