PDA

View Full Version : Best vacuum cleaner for "House of Cats"?


Eddy Bentley
June 27th 07, 07:11 PM
Hi.

I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
follows.

For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a very
powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way of
the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)

For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it a
go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You push
the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway, before
we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our hands
around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
our industrial cleaner it was a joke!

Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then we
gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!

Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings to
carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?

We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its suction
point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
the suction.

Maybe we should use both machines?

But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?

I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!

What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?

Eddy.

Sherry
June 27th 07, 11:44 PM
On Jun 27, 1:11 pm, Eddy Bentley
> wrote:
> Hi.
>
> I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
> cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
> follows.
>
> For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
> house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a very
> powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way of
> the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
> the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
> extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
> try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)
>
> For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
> better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
> left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
> after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it a
> go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You push
> the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway, before
> we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our hands
> around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
> our industrial cleaner it was a joke!
>
> Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then we
> gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
> dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
> centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
> sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
> no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
> was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
> carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!
>
> Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings to
> carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?
>
> We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
> the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its suction
> point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
> the suction.
>
> Maybe we should use both machines?
>
> But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
> combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?
>
> I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
> Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
> excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!
>
> What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?
>
> Eddy.

I've heard mixed reviews over the Dyson thats specifically marketed
for pet owners
.. I wanted one, untilI did some research and read some reviews...now
I'm not so sure.

I've never seen an Electrolux upright! My mom had a canister one,
which really was awesome
in its day.

Sherry

Cheryl
June 28th 07, 12:01 AM
On Wed 27 Jun 2007 06:44:23p, Sherry wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ups.com>:

> I've heard mixed reviews over the Dyson thats specifically
> marketed for pet owners
> . I wanted one, untilI did some research and read some
> reviews...now I'm not so sure.
>
> I've never seen an Electrolux upright! My mom had a canister
> one, which really was awesome
> in its day.
>

Count me in on one who loves the Dyson. Every time I vacuum it
picks up enough fur to knit another cat. And I vacuum now 2x per
week. Should do it more, though.

Someone I know loves one called Rainbow. It sucks the stuff up into
a water chamber, which has pros and cons. My SIL had one of those,
but now has a Dyson and she likes it better. But the person I know
who still has a Rainbow swears by it.

--
Cheryl

Barry
June 28th 07, 12:11 AM
On Jun 27, 7:01 pm, Cheryl > wrote:
> On Wed 27 Jun 2007 06:44:23p, Sherry wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
> > I've heard mixed reviews over the Dyson thats specifically
> > marketed for pet owners
> > . I wanted one, untilI did some research and read some
> > reviews...now I'm not so sure.
>
> > I've never seen an Electrolux upright! My mom had a canister
> > one, which really was awesome
> > in its day.
>
> Count me in on one who loves the Dyson. Every time I vacuum it
> picks up enough fur to knit another cat. And I vacuum now 2x per
> week. Should do it more, though.

I'm going for the black and decker leaf blower. I never want another
square inch of carpet in my house. I love the bare clean floors. I
just take a leaf blower to mine, cat hair and sox and everything out
the door! so ez

> Someone I know loves one called Rainbow. It sucks the stuff up into
> a water chamber, which has pros and cons. My SIL had one of those,
> but now has a Dyson and she likes it better. But the person I know
> who still has a Rainbow swears by it.

yakkin like a pac man

MaryL
June 28th 07, 12:30 AM
"Eddy Bentley" > wrote in message
...
> Hi.
>
> I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
> cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
> follows.
>
> For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
> house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a very
> powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way of
> the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
> the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
> extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
> try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)
>
> For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
> better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
> left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
> after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it a
> go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You push
> the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway, before
> we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our hands
> around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
> our industrial cleaner it was a joke!
>
> Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then we
> gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
> dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
> centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
> sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
> no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
> was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
> carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!
>
> Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings to
> carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?
>
> We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
> the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its suction
> point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
> the suction.
>
> Maybe we should use both machines?
>
> But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
> combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?
>
> I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
> Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
> excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!
>
> What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?
>
> Eddy.
>

I have a Dyson "The Animal," and it's fantastic. I've read mixed reviews so
can't say if I have just been "lucky," but this one cleans rings around my
previous vacuums (most recently, a Panasonic). And, it does have brushes,
even though their ads focus almost entirely on suction power. You can also
get a smaller rotating brush for furniture. They're not really brushes in
the traditional sense -- more a series of spaced bristles -- but it works!
The Dyson is big and heavy, but it's very easy to maneuver because it has
large wheels.

MaryL

Eddy Bentley
June 28th 07, 11:02 AM
Barry wrote:
> I'm going for the black and decker leaf blower. I never want another
> square inch of carpet in my house. I love the bare clean floors. I
> just take a leaf blower to mine, cat hair and sox and everything out
> the door! so ez

That's original, Barry! But doesn't your leaf-blower also blow a lot of
the dust and fur into the air . . . floating back down to the ground
after you passed by?

Eddy.

Eddy Bentley
June 28th 07, 11:05 AM
MaryL wrote:
> I have a Dyson "The Animal," and it's fantastic. I've read mixed reviews so
> can't say if I have just been "lucky," but this one cleans rings around my
> previous vacuums (most recently, a Panasonic). And, it does have brushes,
> even though their ads focus almost entirely on suction power. You can also
> get a smaller rotating brush for furniture. They're not really brushes in
> the traditional sense -- more a series of spaced bristles -- but it works!
> The Dyson is big and heavy, but it's very easy to maneuver because it has
> large wheels.

Hi there, Mary. Thanks for the info.

If you lie your Dyson "Animal" on its side and then switch it on, can
you see brushes revolving? And if you can, then do they revolve really
fast - so that as you pass over the carpet every bit of it is likely to
brushed half a dozen times at least?

Thanks.

Eddy.

Sherry
June 29th 07, 02:49 PM
On Jun 27, 6:30 pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Eddy Bentley" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > Hi.
>
> > I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
> > cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
> > follows.
>
> > For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
> > house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a very
> > powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way of
> > the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
> > the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
> > extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
> > try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)
>
> > For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
> > better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
> > left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
> > after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it a
> > go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You push
> > the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway, before
> > we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our hands
> > around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
> > our industrial cleaner it was a joke!
>
> > Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then we
> > gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
> > dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
> > centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
> > sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
> > no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
> > was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
> > carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!
>
> > Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings to
> > carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?
>
> > We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
> > the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its suction
> > point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
> > the suction.
>
> > Maybe we should use both machines?
>
> > But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
> > combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?
>
> > I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
> > Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
> > excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!
>
> > What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?
>
> > Eddy.
>
> I have a Dyson "The Animal," and it's fantastic. I've read mixed reviews so
> can't say if I have just been "lucky," but this one cleans rings around my
> previous vacuums (most recently, a Panasonic). And, it does have brushes,
> even though their ads focus almost entirely on suction power. You can also
> get a smaller rotating brush for furniture. They're not really brushes in
> the traditional sense -- more a series of spaced bristles -- but it works!
> The Dyson is big and heavy, but it's very easy to maneuver because it has
> large wheels.
>
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -

Mary, the way I understood it, the Animal vac is the exact same
vaccum as the regular Dyson, as far
as the motor and amperage, it just has different attachments that are
more suitable for picking
up fur. Do you know if that's true? Also, does it seem top-heavy to
you? That seems to be one
of the complaints I keep hearing. I need to just go try one out.

Sherry

MaryL
June 29th 07, 06:23 PM
"Sherry" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On Jun 27, 6:30 pm, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
> wrote:
>> "Eddy Bentley" > wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > Hi.
>>
>> > I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
>> > cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
>> > follows.
>>
>> > For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
>> > house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a
>> > very
>> > powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way of
>> > the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
>> > the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
>> > extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
>> > try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)
>>
>> > For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
>> > better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
>> > left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
>> > after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it
>> > a
>> > go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You
>> > push
>> > the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway, before
>> > we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our
>> > hands
>> > around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
>> > our industrial cleaner it was a joke!
>>
>> > Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then we
>> > gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
>> > dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
>> > centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
>> > sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
>> > no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
>> > was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
>> > carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!
>>
>> > Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings to
>> > carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?
>>
>> > We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
>> > the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its suction
>> > point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
>> > the suction.
>>
>> > Maybe we should use both machines?
>>
>> > But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
>> > combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?
>>
>> > I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
>> > Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
>> > excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!
>>
>> > What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?
>>
>> > Eddy.
>>
>> I have a Dyson "The Animal," and it's fantastic. I've read mixed reviews
>> so
>> can't say if I have just been "lucky," but this one cleans rings around
>> my
>> previous vacuums (most recently, a Panasonic). And, it does have
>> brushes,
>> even though their ads focus almost entirely on suction power. You can
>> also
>> get a smaller rotating brush for furniture. They're not really brushes
>> in
>> the traditional sense -- more a series of spaced bristles -- but it
>> works!
>> The Dyson is big and heavy, but it's very easy to maneuver because it has
>> large wheels.
>>
>> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> Mary, the way I understood it, the Animal vac is the exact same
> vaccum as the regular Dyson, as far
> as the motor and amperage, it just has different attachments that are
> more suitable for picking
> up fur. Do you know if that's true? Also, does it seem top-heavy to
> you? That seems to be one
> of the complaints I keep hearing. I need to just go try one out.
>
> Sherry
>

Yes, I think that is correct (concerning the attachments). I have not found
it to be top-heavy. It is very heavy in weight but is easy to maneuver
because of the large wheels. On the other hand, I would not want to have to
carry it up and down stairs. It has a very long vacuum extension for the
attachments (17 feet, if I remember correctly). I can leave the vacuum in
the middle of the room and use the attachments with the vacuum hose (the
hose that connects to attachments, not the cord) to clean furniture. I have
seen pictures of people using it in that same way to clean stairs. It has
never fallen over, compared to some other vacs that seemed to topple with
the slightest pull on the hose.

MaryL

Photos of Duffy and Holly: >'o'<
Duffy: http://tinyurl.com/cslwf
Holly: http://tinyurl.com/9t68o
Duffy and Holly together: http://tinyurl.com/8b47e

Christina Websell
June 29th 07, 09:00 PM
"MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
...
>
> "Eddy Bentley" > wrote in message
> ...
>> Hi.
>>
>> I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
>> cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
>> follows.
>>
>> For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
>> house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a very
>> powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way of
>> the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
>> the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
>> extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
>> try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)
>>
>> For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
>> better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
>> left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
>> after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it a
>> go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You push
>> the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway, before
>> we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our hands
>> around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
>> our industrial cleaner it was a joke!
>>
>> Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then we
>> gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
>> dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
>> centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
>> sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
>> no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
>> was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
>> carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!
>>
>> Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings to
>> carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?
>>
>> We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
>> the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its suction
>> point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
>> the suction.
>>
>> Maybe we should use both machines?
>>
>> But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
>> combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?
>>
>> I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
>> Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
>> excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!
>>
>> What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?
>>
>> Eddy.
>>
>
> I have a Dyson "The Animal," and it's fantastic. I've read mixed reviews
> so can't say if I have just been "lucky," but this one cleans rings around
> my previous vacuums (most recently, a Panasonic). And, it does have
> brushes, even though their ads focus almost entirely on suction power.
> You can also get a smaller rotating brush for furniture. They're not
> really brushes in the traditional sense -- more a series of spaced
> bristles -- but it works! The Dyson is big and heavy, but it's very easy
> to maneuver because it has large wheels.
>
I've had a cylinder Dyson for years, it's a DCO2, that's how old it is. I
love it. Every time I use it (twice a week) it picks up enough cat hair and
regular fluff to knit another cat. I can't recommend Dysons highly enough.
It knocks spots off every other vacuum cleaner I ever had.
I like the cylinder version because it is designed to sit on every stair as
I go up vacuuming. If you have a bungalow or live on one floor only, the
upright version might suit.

Tweed

Sherry
June 29th 07, 09:28 PM
On Jun 29, 3:00 pm, "Christina Websell"
> wrote:
> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > "Eddy Bentley" > wrote in message
> ...
> >> Hi.
>
> >> I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
> >> cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
> >> follows.
>
> >> For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
> >> house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a very
> >> powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way of
> >> the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
> >> the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
> >> extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
> >> try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)
>
> >> For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
> >> better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
> >> left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
> >> after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it a
> >> go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You push
> >> the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway, before
> >> we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our hands
> >> around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
> >> our industrial cleaner it was a joke!
>
> >> Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then we
> >> gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
> >> dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
> >> centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
> >> sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
> >> no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
> >> was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
> >> carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!
>
> >> Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings to
> >> carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?
>
> >> We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
> >> the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its suction
> >> point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
> >> the suction.
>
> >> Maybe we should use both machines?
>
> >> But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
> >> combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?
>
> >> I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
> >> Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
> >> excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!
>
> >> What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?
>
> >> Eddy.
>
> > I have a Dyson "The Animal," and it's fantastic. I've read mixed reviews
> > so can't say if I have just been "lucky," but this one cleans rings around
> > my previous vacuums (most recently, a Panasonic). And, it does have
> > brushes, even though their ads focus almost entirely on suction power.
> > You can also get a smaller rotating brush for furniture. They're not
> > really brushes in the traditional sense -- more a series of spaced
> > bristles -- but it works! The Dyson is big and heavy, but it's very easy
> > to maneuver because it has large wheels.
>
> I've had a cylinder Dyson for years, it's a DCO2, that's how old it is. I
> love it. Every time I use it (twice a week) it picks up enough cat hair and
> regular fluff to knit another cat. I can't recommend Dysons highly enough.
> It knocks spots off every other vacuum cleaner I ever had.
> I like the cylinder version because it is designed to sit on every stair as
> I go up vacuuming. If you have a bungalow or live on one floor only, the
> upright version might suit.
>
> Tweed- Hide quoted text -

It's a good testimony for Dyson that yours is still going strong. Most
all vacuum cleaners
pick up very well when you first get them. After a couple of years,
some not so good anymore.

Sherry

MaryL
June 29th 07, 10:07 PM
"Sherry" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> On Jun 29, 3:00 pm, "Christina Websell"
> > wrote:
>> "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER> wrote in message
>>
>> ...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> > "Eddy Bentley" > wrote in
>> > message
>> ...
>> >> Hi.
>>
>> >> I would really like to hear people's views on what kind of vacuum
>> >> cleaner is best for a house of cats! The reason I'm asking is as
>> >> follows.
>>
>> >> For about ten years we have had an industrial vacuum cleaner in our
>> >> house - the sort used by cleaners in office buildings, etc. It's a
>> >> very
>> >> powerful upright cylinder on wheels and you vacuum the carpet by way
>> >> of
>> >> the long "snake" attachment. The suction is extraordinary and you rub
>> >> the carpet with the snake thing, with either the brush retracted or
>> >> extended. (We've always used it with the brushes extended in order to
>> >> try and rake up as much cat-hair as possible.)
>>
>> >> For ten years, short of buying a Dyson, we have thought we couldn't do
>> >> better than this machine. However, the previous owners of this house
>> >> left an old upright Electrolux in the loft of our garage and, finally,
>> >> after three years of ignoring it, yesterday we got it down and gave it
>> >> a
>> >> go on our regularly cleaned carpets. It's like an old Hoover. You
>> >> push
>> >> the whole thing round the carpet as if it were a brush. Anyway,
>> >> before
>> >> we tested it we turned it over, switched on the power, and put our
>> >> hands
>> >> around the front to gauge the amount of suction. LOUSY! Compared to
>> >> our industrial cleaner it was a joke!
>>
>> >> Anyway, we made sure the bag inside was empty to start with and then
>> >> we
>> >> gave the Electrolux a spin over the carpets of our living-room and
>> >> dining-room. If it didn't perform it was destined for the recycling
>> >> centre down the road! We took out the bag to see what "the lousy
>> >> sucker" had managed to pick up and . . . WE WERE AMAZED! The bag was
>> >> no longer empty but practically FULL ! Furthermore, the stuff inside
>> >> was ALL cat hair! There was no dust, no dirt, no bits - because our
>> >> carpets are regularly cleaned by the "expert sucker"!
>>
>> >> Clearly, our expert sucker is useless at picking up hair that clings
>> >> to
>> >> carpet, or hair which gets trapped in carpet. But why?
>>
>> >> We examined the Electrolux in action again and paid more attention to
>> >> the RAPIDLY revolving cylinder of brushes immediately below its
>> >> suction
>> >> point. These really give the carpet a good brushing - in addition to
>> >> the suction.
>>
>> >> Maybe we should use both machines?
>>
>> >> But the Electrolux is old. Maybe there's a new model out there that
>> >> combines excellent suction with rapid circular brushing?
>>
>> >> I've had a look at the Dyson website today and from what I've seen the
>> >> Dyson only sucks. Our discovery with the old Electrolux suggests that
>> >> excellent suction is simply not enough where cat hair is involved!
>>
>> >> What's best? What do you think? What do people recommend?
>>
>> >> Eddy.
>>
>> > I have a Dyson "The Animal," and it's fantastic. I've read mixed
>> > reviews
>> > so can't say if I have just been "lucky," but this one cleans rings
>> > around
>> > my previous vacuums (most recently, a Panasonic). And, it does have
>> > brushes, even though their ads focus almost entirely on suction power.
>> > You can also get a smaller rotating brush for furniture. They're not
>> > really brushes in the traditional sense -- more a series of spaced
>> > bristles -- but it works! The Dyson is big and heavy, but it's very
>> > easy
>> > to maneuver because it has large wheels.
>>
>> I've had a cylinder Dyson for years, it's a DCO2, that's how old it is.
>> I
>> love it. Every time I use it (twice a week) it picks up enough cat hair
>> and
>> regular fluff to knit another cat. I can't recommend Dysons highly
>> enough.
>> It knocks spots off every other vacuum cleaner I ever had.
>> I like the cylinder version because it is designed to sit on every stair
>> as
>> I go up vacuuming. If you have a bungalow or live on one floor only, the
>> upright version might suit.
>>
>> Tweed- Hide quoted text -
>
> It's a good testimony for Dyson that yours is still going strong. Most
> all vacuum cleaners
> pick up very well when you first get them. After a couple of years,
> some not so good anymore.
>
> Sherry
>

I bought mine in Dec. 2004. A fantastic machine, despite some mixed
reviews!

MaryL

Aileen
June 29th 07, 10:44 PM
I reccomend the Fantom. I have longhaired cats and when I vacuum I
can't believe how much hair it picks up. You don't see the dirt but
when you vacuum its just amazing how much it picks up. I would never
use any other vacuum but my Fantom!

cybercat
June 29th 07, 10:49 PM
"Aileen" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>I reccomend the Fantom. I have longhaired cats and when I vacuum I
> can't believe how much hair it picks up. You don't see the dirt but
> when you vacuum its just amazing how much it picks up. I would never
> use any other vacuum but my Fantom!
>

I bought a Fantom Thunder when they first came out (maybe 1997?), and it is
a very powerful vacuum. But is is soooo heavy. We have three floors, and it
is just awful getting up and down stairs. I finally got a cheap little Dirt
Devil upright, and it does a fine job and is a lot lighter. That said, I
have never used a more powerful vacuum than the Fantom.

cybercat
June 30th 07, 07:19 AM
> wrote
> Has anyone any experience with the steam cleaner vacuums?
>
> As an allergy sufferer, I've made a decision never to put down carpets
> again. I might try a throw rug, but good flooring is a much better and
> cleaner investment.

Smart woman. We have hardwoods with throw rugs, though there is a large
rug in the dining room and carpeting in the kitchen (really odd, I know ...
it
is sort of an industrial kind, came with the house) and wall-to-wall in two
rooms we use for an office and storage.

I would not buy a steam cleaner because most have very small water
tanks you have to keep refilling.

What I do is rent a "Rug Doctor" a few times a year and give the rugs
and carpet I do have a deep cleaning. I go over the kitchen carpet four
times or more before the water comes up clear. It does a nice job. (I
am doing it tomorrow, as a matter of fact ...)

Eddy Bentley
June 30th 07, 01:07 PM
Thanks, everyone, for further thoughts on the best vacuum for a house of
cats. I've also been doing a lot of online research. The concensus
seems to be:

A. The "drag-arounds":
- a Henry Turbo HVR200T-22 (aka "Henry Hound")
- a Miele Cat & Dog

B. The "push-arounds":
- any Sebo BS36
- any Dyson, provided you treat it like a cleaning goddess and
lavish adoration and love upon its filters, conduits, and plastic parts!

So we're torn between the "drag-arounds" and the "push-arounds".

The Henry has fantastic suction AND a powered brush head. However, it
is bulky to store and a bit of a pain to be carrying up and
down the stairs, but you use it one state at all times, i.e. you use
the hose to do the floors AND the stairs. On the other hand, you can't
stand Henry by himself half way up the stairs and the hose doesn't look
very long - so buying an extension or two for the hose might be
necessary in order to do the stairs?

Re. the Dysons, I like the idea of being able to see into their
transparent parts to see whether cleaning is needed or not. Also, the
Dyson's "wand" (hose) is apparently long enough for you to do a long
flight of carpeted stairs in one go. Unlike the Sebo though you can't
glide the main machine under beds etc. Lots of people remark on the
brittleness of the Dyson's parts and though we do treat our things with
care, when you're vacuuming, pulling and pushing that thing round the
floor and sometimes in a hurry, you are bound to hit bits of it quite
hard aginst skirtings and furniture legs occasionally.

Hmmm. For thoroughness and ease of use, I think it's going to be either
the Henry or the Sebo. But Henry's awkward, and the Sebo BS36 is a bit
pricey.

Eddy.

blkcatgal
July 1st 07, 11:14 PM
I just bought a Dyson DC-17. Was a bit expensive but I bought it at Bed,
Bath & Beyond and they always are sending out 20% off coupons which I used.
Saved me about $120. The Dyson is great, picks up all sorts of stuff that I
didn't know was in the carpets, but you have to be careful on rugs and not
use the beater brush.

Sue.

"Eddy Bentley" > wrote in message
...
> Thanks, everyone, for further thoughts on the best vacuum for a house of
> cats. I've also been doing a lot of online research. The concensus
> seems to be:
>
> A. The "drag-arounds":
> - a Henry Turbo HVR200T-22 (aka "Henry Hound")
> - a Miele Cat & Dog
>
> B. The "push-arounds":
> - any Sebo BS36
> - any Dyson, provided you treat it like a cleaning goddess and
> lavish adoration and love upon its filters, conduits, and plastic parts!
>
> So we're torn between the "drag-arounds" and the "push-arounds".
>
> The Henry has fantastic suction AND a powered brush head. However, it
> is bulky to store and a bit of a pain to be carrying up and
> down the stairs, but you use it one state at all times, i.e. you use
> the hose to do the floors AND the stairs. On the other hand, you can't
> stand Henry by himself half way up the stairs and the hose doesn't look
> very long - so buying an extension or two for the hose might be
> necessary in order to do the stairs?
>
> Re. the Dysons, I like the idea of being able to see into their
> transparent parts to see whether cleaning is needed or not. Also, the
> Dyson's "wand" (hose) is apparently long enough for you to do a long
> flight of carpeted stairs in one go. Unlike the Sebo though you can't
> glide the main machine under beds etc. Lots of people remark on the
> brittleness of the Dyson's parts and though we do treat our things with
> care, when you're vacuuming, pulling and pushing that thing round the
> floor and sometimes in a hurry, you are bound to hit bits of it quite
> hard aginst skirtings and furniture legs occasionally.
>
> Hmmm. For thoroughness and ease of use, I think it's going to be either
> the Henry or the Sebo. But Henry's awkward, and the Sebo BS36 is a bit
> pricey.
>
> Eddy.
>