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cybercat
June 30th 07, 05:47 PM
So you have a kitten who is sneezing. You figure, just like a person, he
probably has a cold that will run its course and then he will be fine. Why
take him to the vet? After all, this is the case with people, so why not
cats?

Unlike humans, cats have very small nasal passages relative to their bodies,
that fill up quickly.

Unlike humans, cats lose their appetites easily when they lose their senses
of smell.

Unlike humans, cats can get into trouble very quickly if they stop eating
even for a few days.

Why? There are many reasons I will not pretend to know all of them. One is
that cats get a lot of their moisture from food---they have different
drinking habits than we do. So they can get dehydrated more quickly.
When the do, they feel really lousy and the original problem is exacerbated
because when they feel really lousy they don't WANT to eat.

These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats to
take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper respiratory
infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen the congestion,
help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure that a common cold
does not turn into a more serious infection.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

w[_2_]
June 30th 07, 06:41 PM
cybercat wrote:

> Unlike humans, cats lose their appetites easily when they lose their senses
> of smell.
>
Yes, that happened to a cat of mine and I took her to the vet. She had
cryptococcus and after over a year of medicine costing thousands of
dollars she is fine.

> Unlike humans, cats can get into trouble very quickly if they stop eating
> even for a few days.

Yes she did stop eating, I had to syringe feed her for a month.

BUT THIS HASN'T HAPPENED TO ANY OF THE CURRENT CATS THAT ARE SNEEZING.




>
> These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats to
> take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper respiratory
> infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen the congestion,
> help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure that a common cold
> does not turn into a more serious infection.
>

Well, most of the vet sites I checked beg to differ. If the cat is
eating, active, not depressed and has no thick nasal discharge they can
just be watched.


ITS ALL ABOUT GOING TO THE VET WHEN APPROPRIATE, NOT EVERY TIME YOUR CAT
LOOKS AT YOU CROSSEYED.

THATS IT WITH YOU CYBER. PLONK!

Matthew
June 30th 07, 06:43 PM
But Cybercat all that would be some what common sense or if some one that
took the time to do a little resaerch instead of comming to the groups and
making smart comments

Since they have the internet they can easily google feline sneezing and get
these results
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+sneezing

or they can google feline upper respiratory infection and get these results
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+upper+respiratory+infection&btnG=Search

I glad people come and ask for help but when will they realize that we are
not vets and the best way to insure the health of their furballs is to take
them to a trusted vet; who are trained to evaluate and treat problems. All
we can do is give our experience with certain matters like my self who can
give experience of having a prodactyl cat, an epileptic cat and a diabetic
cat

If you own a furball it is you responsibility to make sure to take care of
them. I always love the excuse we don't have the money sometimes I can
believe that; it is the truth, but sacrifices need to be made how much did
you just spend to go out and eat or buy that 6 pack or that pack of smokes.
I make a rule even though I have enough money to pay for any vet bill that
comes up before this time I always took about $10 a cat per month and put
it away in a savings account. If I had to take a daily work daily pay job in
between my regular job I did it. I did not use that money for anything
just kept adding to it. It came in handy many of times when I needed money
and did not have extra to use. I remember many of nights eating a 20 cent
rice bag and those 5 cents noodles packs for the fur babies need to eat and
be taken care of. Maybe I am just from a different age and was raised to do
the right thing.

w[_2_]
June 30th 07, 06:50 PM
Matthew wrote:
> But Cybercat all that would be some what common sense or if some one that
> took the time to do a little resaerch instead of comming to the groups and
> making smart comments
>
> Since they have the internet they can easily google feline sneezing and get
> these results
> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+sneezing
>
> or they can google feline upper respiratory infection and get these results
> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+upper+respiratory+infection&btnG=Search
>
> I glad people come and ask for help but when will they realize that we are
> not vets and the best way to insure the health of their furballs is to take
> them to a trusted vet; who are trained to evaluate and treat problems. All
> we can do is give our experience with certain matters like my self who can
> give experience of having a prodactyl cat, an epileptic cat and a diabetic
> cat
>
> If you own a furball it is you responsibility to make sure to take care of
> them. I always love the excuse we don't have the money sometimes I can
> believe that; it is the truth, but sacrifices need to be made how much did
> you just spend to go out and eat or buy that 6 pack or that pack of smokes.
> I make a rule even though I have enough money to pay for any vet bill that
> comes up before this time I always took about $10 a cat per month and put
> it away in a savings account. If I had to take a daily work daily pay job in
> between my regular job I did it. I did not use that money for anything
> just kept adding to it. It came in handy many of times when I needed money
> and did not have extra to use. I remember many of nights eating a 20 cent
> rice bag and those 5 cents noodles packs for the fur babies need to eat and
> be taken care of. Maybe I am just from a different age and was raised to do
> the right thing.
>
>
Before you shove the innuendo around that I was not raised to do the
right thing re-read the original post. These are a stray mother and the
kittens she had on my back porch. I put them in a room in my house. I
have already had them vaccinated and spayed / neutered. So I am doing
the right thing.

I suppose I should have sprayed the garden hose on them when they were
on the porch and scared them off. Then jerks like you wouldn't be
implying that I am too cheap to take them to the vet because they
wouldn't be here. If I was cheap they would have gone to animal control
and been put down the first day I saw them.

JERK

Matthew
June 30th 07, 07:01 PM
"w" >

What did I imply? Did I mention your name? or is it just your own guilty
conscience getting the best of you. I made a general view of people coming
to the group. You are not the first that has complained about money and you
won't be the last it was a generalized view but If the truth hurts that
is your own conscience winning out

And making the last comment that you made! Do you really think anyone will
really give care what you think? All we care about id the health and well
being of the furballs. If I am jerk for telling the truth than I am a jerk
and I will be proud of it.

But it looks like my words by your comments already did more good than you
will ever let on.

cybercat
June 30th 07, 07:17 PM
"w" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>> Unlike humans, cats lose their appetites easily when they lose their
>> senses of smell.
>>
> Yes, that happened to a cat of mine and I took her to the vet. She had
> cryptococcus and after over a year of medicine costing thousands of
> dollars she is fine.
>
>> Unlike humans, cats can get into trouble very quickly if they stop eating
>> even for a few days.
>
> Yes she did stop eating, I had to syringe feed her for a month.
>
> BUT THIS HASN'T HAPPENED TO ANY OF THE CURRENT CATS THAT ARE SNEEZING.
>
>
>
>
>>
>> These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats
>> to take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper respiratory
>> infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen the
>> congestion, help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure that
>> a common cold does not turn into a more serious infection.
>
> Well, most of the vet sites I checked beg to differ. If the cat is
> eating, active, not depressed and has no thick nasal discharge they can
> just be watched.
>
>
> ITS ALL ABOUT GOING TO THE VET WHEN APPROPRIATE, NOT EVERY TIME YOUR CAT
> LOOKS AT YOU CROSSEYED.
>
> THATS IT WITH YOU CYBER. PLONK!
>
>
>
ow

lol



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

cybercat
June 30th 07, 07:18 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
>
> "w" >
>
> What did I imply? Did I mention your name? or is it just your own guilty
> conscience getting the best of you. I made a general view of people
> coming to the group. You are not the first that has complained about
> money and you won't be the last it was a generalized view but If the
> truth hurts that is your own conscience winning out
>
> And making the last comment that you made! Do you really think anyone
> will really give care what you think? All we care about id the health
> and well being of the furballs. If I am jerk for telling the truth than
> I am a jerk and I will be proud of it.
>
> But it looks like my words by your comments already did more good than you
> will ever let on.
>

Have you figured out what kind of help it wants? It clearly said, "HELP" in
the original post. That is all I asked it. Sheesh, people are so touchy.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Rhonda
July 1st 07, 06:35 PM
cybercat wrote:

> These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats to
> take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper respiratory
> infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen the congestion,
> help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure that a common cold
> does not turn into a more serious infection.

I wish vets could help with the congestion.

We've gone through bouts of URI viruses here, and the scariest is when
they can hardly breathe and can't eat. The vets (including the emergency
vet) have never prescribed a decongestant -- I thought it was because
there is not one for cats. They have always told me the virus has to run
it's course and we just have to try to strengthen the immune system. We
had to buy the stinkiest food imaginable and tackle it that way.

For kittens and older cats they have prescribed antibiotics in case it
was traveling into their chests, and we have at times done antibiotic
eye drops when their eyes get infected.

I never know what to do about the congestion. Vets have told me to put
them in the bathroom while we shower. When our diabetic cat stopped
eating (which nearly gave me heart failure) I spent lots of time with
him under a towel, the both of us over a boiling pan of water. I ended
up force-feeding him for days.

If anyone knows of decongestants for cats, I hope I never have to use
them but I would love to know.

Rhonda

cybercat
July 1st 07, 06:42 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote
>
> I wish vets could help with the congestion.
>
> We've gone through bouts of URI viruses here, and the scariest is when
> they can hardly breathe and can't eat. The vets (including the emergency
> vet) have never prescribed a decongestant -- I thought it was because
> there is not one for cats. They have always told me the virus has to run
> it's course and we just have to try to strengthen the immune system. We
> had to buy the stinkiest food imaginable and tackle it that way.
>
> For kittens and older cats they have prescribed antibiotics in case it was
> traveling into their chests, and we have at times done antibiotic eye
> drops when their eyes get infected.
>
> I never know what to do about the congestion. Vets have told me to put
> them in the bathroom while we shower. When our diabetic cat stopped eating
> (which nearly gave me heart failure) I spent lots of time with him under a
> towel, the both of us over a boiling pan of water. I ended up
> force-feeding him for days.
>
> If anyone knows of decongestants for cats, I hope I never have to use them
> but I would love to know.
>

Maybe Phil--your favorite guy--has some ideas. I know that when I
give Gracie Chlortrimeton for her allergies, the "thickness" in her purr
decreases--after she wakes up from sleeping 26 hours a day instead
of 23! But I am sure it would not work the same for a UTI.

It seems to me there must be a down side to using decongestants
on cats. Because lungs are lungs, you know? But then, I know cat
physiology is very different from human physiology.

Cheryl
July 1st 07, 07:04 PM
On Sun 01 Jul 2007 01:35:02p, Rhonda wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:

> For kittens and older cats they have prescribed antibiotics in
> case it was traveling into their chests, and we have at times
> done antibiotic eye drops when their eyes get infected.
>
Same here - Rhett and Scarlett had a couple of rounds of
antibiotics but only if the nasal discharge was ? Clear? Yellow? I
can't remember which, but I tend to think yellow. Other times, no
antibiotics at all, but yes on the eye drops or more commonly for
them, ointment.

> I never know what to do about the congestion. Vets have told me
> to put them in the bathroom while we shower. When our diabetic
> cat stopped eating (which nearly gave me heart failure) I spent
> lots of time with him under a towel, the both of us over a
> boiling pan of water. I ended up force-feeding him for days.
>
I know how scary that can be and it takes a lot of dedication to
get them through that!

> If anyone knows of decongestants for cats, I hope I never have
> to use them but I would love to know.

Our vet prescribed Chlor-Trimaton several times, even for kittens.
Just a very small dose 1x per day until the breathing clears. It
worked wonders. For Bonnie, who sometimes gets a runny nose this
time of year, she will get an injectable antihistamine from the
vet. Fast-acting and seemingly long-lasting for her. It only takes
one shot when it happens.

--
Cheryl

cybercat
July 1st 07, 07:58 PM
"Cheryl" > wrote
>> If anyone knows of decongestants for cats, I hope I never have
>> to use them but I would love to know.
>
> Our vet prescribed Chlor-Trimaton several times, even for kittens.
> Just a very small dose 1x per day until the breathing clears. It
> worked wonders.

This is good to know, I wasn't sure if it was just for allergies.
It seems anything that dries out the body in general would
help dry up congestion some.


>For Bonnie, who sometimes gets a runny nose this
> time of year, she will get an injectable antihistamine from the
> vet. Fast-acting and seemingly long-lasting for her. It only takes
> one shot when it happens.
>

Next time you go, if you think of it, will you ask the vet what the name
of that is?

Cheryl
July 1st 07, 09:30 PM
On Sun 01 Jul 2007 02:58:21p, cybercat wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:

>>For Bonnie, who sometimes gets a runny nose this
>> time of year, she will get an injectable antihistamine from the
>> vet. Fast-acting and seemingly long-lasting for her. It only
>> takes one shot when it happens.
>>
>
> Next time you go, if you think of it, will you ask the vet what
> the name of that is?

I looked it up in her file and it says
IDiphenhyd INJ. 50mg .25 $8

So based on the rest of the receipt, she got 1/4 of a 50mg dose
because I think the .25 is in the "Quantity" column. I hope that
sounds right; I really can't decipher this. Basically, it's
injectable Benadryl (Diphenhydramine).

--
Cheryl

Matthew
July 1st 07, 09:42 PM
"Cheryl" > wrote in message
...
> On Sun 01 Jul 2007 02:58:21p, cybercat wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav >:
>
>>>For Bonnie, who sometimes gets a runny nose this
>>> time of year, she will get an injectable antihistamine from the
>>> vet. Fast-acting and seemingly long-lasting for her. It only
>>> takes one shot when it happens.
>>>
>>
>> Next time you go, if you think of it, will you ask the vet what
>> the name of that is?
>
> I looked it up in her file and it says
> IDiphenhyd INJ. 50mg .25 $8
>
> So based on the rest of the receipt, she got 1/4 of a 50mg dose
> because I think the .25 is in the "Quantity" column. I hope that
> sounds right; I really can't decipher this. Basically, it's
> injectable Benadryl (Diphenhydramine).
>
> --
> Cheryl
>
I thought Benadryl caused antihistamine toxicosis in cats. I can't remember
to be positive but I think I remember my vet saying never give any to cats

Cheryl
July 1st 07, 09:52 PM
On Sun 01 Jul 2007 04:42:25p, Matthew wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> I thought Benadryl caused antihistamine toxicosis in cats. I
> can't remember to be positive but I think I remember my vet
> saying never give any to cats

I never bothered to look it up since the vet has given it to her
three years in a row now, just once at this time of year. At the
spay/neuter clinic where they do vaccinations they also use Benadryl
for those animals who've had a reaction to a vaccine. So just saying
I've not heard of that but it's worth researching. Thanks for the
heads-up Matthew.

--
Cheryl

CatNipped[_2_]
July 2nd 07, 02:58 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
.. .
> So you have a kitten who is sneezing. You figure, just like a person, he
> probably has a cold that will run its course and then he will be fine. Why
> take him to the vet? After all, this is the case with people, so why not
> cats?
>
> Unlike humans, cats have very small nasal passages relative to their
> bodies, that fill up quickly.
>
> Unlike humans, cats lose their appetites easily when they lose their
> senses of smell.
>
> Unlike humans, cats can get into trouble very quickly if they stop eating
> even for a few days.
>
> Why? There are many reasons I will not pretend to know all of them. One is
> that cats get a lot of their moisture from food---they have different
> drinking habits than we do. So they can get dehydrated more quickly.
> When the do, they feel really lousy and the original problem is
> exacerbated because when they feel really lousy they don't WANT to eat.
>
> These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats to
> take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper respiratory
> infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen the
> congestion, help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure that
> a common cold does not turn into a more serious infection.

Yep. The vet gave me nose drops for my two boys, along with Clavamox for
them and for Tayla when he diagnosed all three with URIs. And they *are*
eating much better then they did the day they came home with us.



Hugs,

CatNipped
[i]
>
>
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>

CatNipped[_2_]
July 2nd 07, 03:02 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
> But Cybercat all that would be some what common sense or if some one that
> took the time to do a little resaerch instead of comming to the groups and
> making smart comments
>
> Since they have the internet they can easily google feline sneezing and
> get these results
> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+sneezing
>
> or they can google feline upper respiratory infection and get these
> results
> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+upper+respiratory+infection&btnG=Search
>
> I glad people come and ask for help but when will they realize that we are
> not vets and the best way to insure the health of their furballs is to
> take them to a trusted vet; who are trained to evaluate and treat
> problems. All we can do is give our experience with certain matters like
> my self who can give experience of having a prodactyl cat, an epileptic
> cat and a diabetic cat
>
> If you own a furball it is you responsibility to make sure to take care of
> them. I always love the excuse we don't have the money sometimes I can

My husband and I *LOVE* going to the movies - it's really our only form of
entertainment. When we decided to adopt three more cats to add to the three
in our current clowder, we knew they were all sick with URIs and knew we'd
have to up for the vet expenses, so we decided to forgo movie outings for a
few months - no great hardship, just par for the course if you love your
cats!

Hugs,

CatNipped

> believe that; it is the truth, but sacrifices need to be made how much
> did you just spend to go out and eat or buy that 6 pack or that pack of
> smokes. I make a rule even though I have enough money to pay for any vet
> bill that comes up before this time I always took about $10 a cat per
> month and put it away in a savings account. If I had to take a daily work
> daily pay job in between my regular job I did it. I did not use that
> money for anything just kept adding to it. It came in handy many of times
> when I needed money and did not have extra to use. I remember many of
> nights eating a 20 cent rice bag and those 5 cents noodles packs for the
> fur babies need to eat and be taken care of. Maybe I am just from a
> different age and was raised to do the right thing.
>
>

CatNipped[_2_]
July 2nd 07, 03:20 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
> cybercat wrote:
>
>> These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats
>> to take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper respiratory
>> infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen the
>> congestion, help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure that
>> a common cold does not turn into a more serious infection.
>
> I wish vets could help with the congestion.

The vet gave me eye drops that can be used as nose drops for the kittens.
I'm at work so I can't look at the label to see what it is, but it worked
wonders for my boys - their little noses were cleared up after the first day
and they started eating *MUCH* more when they could finally smell their
food.

I'll look at the label and post the name when I get home tonight.

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
> We've gone through bouts of URI viruses here, and the scariest is when
> they can hardly breathe and can't eat. The vets (including the emergency
> vet) have never prescribed a decongestant -- I thought it was because
> there is not one for cats. They have always told me the virus has to run
> it's course and we just have to try to strengthen the immune system. We
> had to buy the stinkiest food imaginable and tackle it that way.
>
> For kittens and older cats they have prescribed antibiotics in case it was
> traveling into their chests, and we have at times done antibiotic eye
> drops when their eyes get infected.
>
> I never know what to do about the congestion. Vets have told me to put
> them in the bathroom while we shower. When our diabetic cat stopped eating
> (which nearly gave me heart failure) I spent lots of time with him under a
> towel, the both of us over a boiling pan of water. I ended up
> force-feeding him for days.
>
> If anyone knows of decongestants for cats, I hope I never have to use them
> but I would love to know.
>
> Rhonda
>
>
>

Matthew
July 2nd 07, 05:04 PM
Catnipped I think that everyone that truly loves their children human or
furball will sacrifice what ever it takes. I know I have and still will do
what ever it takes


"CatNipped" > wrote in message
...
> "Matthew" > wrote in message
> ...
>> But Cybercat all that would be some what common sense or if some one
>> that took the time to do a little resaerch instead of comming to the
>> groups and making smart comments
>>
>> Since they have the internet they can easily google feline sneezing and
>> get these results
>> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+sneezing
>>
>> or they can google feline upper respiratory infection and get these
>> results
>> http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=feline+upper+respiratory+infection&btnG=Search
>>
>> I glad people come and ask for help but when will they realize that we
>> are not vets and the best way to insure the health of their furballs is
>> to take them to a trusted vet; who are trained to evaluate and treat
>> problems. All we can do is give our experience with certain matters like
>> my self who can give experience of having a prodactyl cat, an epileptic
>> cat and a diabetic cat
>>
>> If you own a furball it is you responsibility to make sure to take care
>> of them. I always love the excuse we don't have the money sometimes I
>> can
>
> My husband and I *LOVE* going to the movies - it's really our only form of
> entertainment. When we decided to adopt three more cats to add to the
> three in our current clowder, we knew they were all sick with URIs and
> knew we'd have to up for the vet expenses, so we decided to forgo movie
> outings for a few months - no great hardship, just par for the course if
> you love your cats!
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped
>
>> believe that; it is the truth, but sacrifices need to be made how much
>> did you just spend to go out and eat or buy that 6 pack or that pack of
>> smokes. I make a rule even though I have enough money to pay for any vet
>> bill that comes up before this time I always took about $10 a cat per
>> month and put it away in a savings account. If I had to take a daily work
>> daily pay job in between my regular job I did it. I did not use that
>> money for anything just kept adding to it. It came in handy many of
>> times when I needed money and did not have extra to use. I remember many
>> of nights eating a 20 cent rice bag and those 5 cents noodles packs for
>> the fur babies need to eat and be taken care of. Maybe I am just from a
>> different age and was raised to do the right thing.
>>
>>
>
>

cybercat
July 2nd 07, 05:08 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote
> [It's so funny trying to give a kitten nose drops - when the snort (as
> they do after every application) they blow bubbles out of their little
> noses!!]
>

hahah, you're such a good mom!

cybercat
July 2nd 07, 05:10 PM
"Matthew" > wrote in message
...
> Catnipped I think that everyone that truly loves their children human or
> furball will sacrifice what ever it takes. I know I have and still will
> do what ever it takes
>
>

You bet, that is what real love is. Love is never selfish.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Rhonda
July 4th 07, 07:04 AM
CatNipped wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>cybercat wrote:
>>
>>
>>>These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats
>>>to take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper respiratory
>>>infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen the
>>>congestion, help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure that
>>>a common cold does not turn into a more serious infection.
>>
>>I wish vets could help with the congestion.
>
>
> The vet gave me eye drops that can be used as nose drops for the kittens.
> I'm at work so I can't look at the label to see what it is, but it worked
> wonders for my boys - their little noses were cleared up after the first day
> and they started eating *MUCH* more when they could finally smell their
> food.
>
> I'll look at the label and post the name when I get home tonight.

Hi CN,

I might have missed some follow-ups, but did you find out what they
were? Sounds like if it was eye drops that were used as nose drops, that
they were an antibiotic.

I would be curious about an antibiotic in the nose that helped, if
that's what it was. Maybe the kitties developed a sinus infection too?

Let me know if found the label.

Thanks,

Rhonda

Rhonda
July 4th 07, 07:05 AM
Thanks, Cheryl. I will ask the vet about that next time, if there is a
next time!

Rhonda

Cheryl wrote:
>
> Our vet prescribed Chlor-Trimaton several times, even for kittens.
> Just a very small dose 1x per day until the breathing clears. It
> worked wonders. For Bonnie, who sometimes gets a runny nose this
> time of year, she will get an injectable antihistamine from the
> vet. Fast-acting and seemingly long-lasting for her. It only takes
> one shot when it happens.
>

CatNipped[_2_]
July 5th 07, 02:25 PM
"Rhonda" > wrote in message
...
>
>
> CatNipped wrote:
>> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
>> ...
>>
>>>cybercat wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>These are good enough reasons for most people who care about their cats
>>>>to take them in when they see signs of a cold or "URI" (upper
>>>>respiratory infection) so that the vet can prescribe something to lessen
>>>>the congestion, help with other symptoms of the cold, and help make sure
>>>>that a common cold does not turn into a more serious infection.
>>>
>>>I wish vets could help with the congestion.
>>
>>
>> The vet gave me eye drops that can be used as nose drops for the kittens.
>> I'm at work so I can't look at the label to see what it is, but it worked
>> wonders for my boys - their little noses were cleared up after the first
>> day and they started eating *MUCH* more when they could finally smell
>> their food.
>>
>> I'll look at the label and post the name when I get home tonight.
>
> Hi CN,
>
> I might have missed some follow-ups, but did you find out what they were?
> Sounds like if it was eye drops that were used as nose drops, that they
> were an antibiotic.
>
> I would be curious about an antibiotic in the nose that helped, if that's
> what it was. Maybe the kitties developed a sinus infection too?
>
> Let me know if found the label.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Rhonda

Sorry, I posted this separately under "Kitten Nose Drops"...

My vet gave me what is, actually, eye drops but said they
work well as nose drops for cats. Going by this one experience alone, I can
say that their nasal congestion cleared up practically overnight when I used
it. Now, caveat here, their nasal congestion could have cleared up without
this - but it certainly didn't hurt them (they are 10 nweeks old), and on
the possibility that this is what helped them, I recommend using it. The
bottle is a vet's sample, so I don't see a "brand" name, but here's what's
on the label:

Neomycin and Polymyxin B Sulfates and Desamethasone Opthalmic Suspension
USP.

Hugs,

CatNipped

Rhonda
July 5th 07, 04:34 PM
CatNipped wrote:
> "Rhonda" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>
>>CatNipped wrote:
>>>
>>>The vet gave me eye drops that can be used as nose drops for the kittens.
>>>I'm at work so I can't look at the label to see what it is, but it worked
>>>wonders for my boys - their little noses were cleared up after the first
>>>day and they started eating *MUCH* more when they could finally smell
>>>their food.
>>>
>>>I'll look at the label and post the name when I get home tonight.
>>
>>Hi CN,
>>
>>I might have missed some follow-ups, but did you find out what they were?
>>Sounds like if it was eye drops that were used as nose drops, that they
>>were an antibiotic.
>>
>>I would be curious about an antibiotic in the nose that helped, if that's
>>what it was. Maybe the kitties developed a sinus infection too?
>>
>>Let me know if found the label.
>
> Sorry, I posted this separately under "Kitten Nose Drops"...
>
> My vet gave me what is, actually, eye drops but said they
> work well as nose drops for cats. Going by this one experience alone, I can
> say that their nasal congestion cleared up practically overnight when I used
> it. Now, caveat here, their nasal congestion could have cleared up without
> this - but it certainly didn't hurt them (they are 10 nweeks old), and on
> the possibility that this is what helped them, I recommend using it. The
> bottle is a vet's sample, so I don't see a "brand" name, but here's what's
> on the label:
>
> Neomycin and Polymyxin B Sulfates and Desamethasone Opthalmic Suspension
> USP.
>
> Hugs,
>
> CatNipped

Thanks, CN, the first two ingredients sound like antibiotics but I don't
know the last thing. I'll look it up later when I have more time.

Thanks!

Rhonda