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cybercat
July 12th 07, 10:50 PM
doofus" > wrote in message ...
>I bought some enzymatic cat toothpaste and a soft bristle brush.
>
> My cat has had most of his teeth removed, before I got him, but the
> remaining ones are red and sore looking near the gum line.
>
> I am hurting or helping by brushing his teeth? I know it is painful to
> him, even though I am gentle.
>
> Should I continue to do it once a day?
>

A vet would have told you that you do not need to brush with
enzymatic toothpaste. Just get it in his mouth.




--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

doofus
July 12th 07, 11:01 PM
I bought some enzymatic cat toothpaste and a soft bristle brush.

My cat has had most of his teeth removed, before I got him, but the
remaining ones are red and sore looking near the gum line.

I am hurting or helping by brushing his teeth? I know it is painful to
him, even though I am gentle.

Should I continue to do it once a day?

---

Disclaimer: for all you "take him to the vet" jerks, not gonna happen
(unless it is life threatening and I cannot treat myself through the
MANY online and other vet suppy houses) too many greedy vets in my area
who would not walk across the street to help an animal unless they can
profit well from it.

cindys
July 13th 07, 12:14 AM
"doofus" > wrote in message ...
>I bought some enzymatic cat toothpaste and a soft bristle brush.
>
> My cat has had most of his teeth removed, before I got him, but the
> remaining ones are red and sore looking near the gum line.
>
> I am hurting or helping by brushing his teeth? I know it is painful to
> him, even though I am gentle.
>
> Should I continue to do it once a day?
-------
It sounds like your cat has gingivitis. This is not something you are going
to fix with enzymatic cleaners, whether you brush or not. Take the cat to a
vet for a dental assessment. The cat toothpaste can be put to use after the
cat has a dental cleaning. It's very important that you do this because the
bacteria in his gums can travel through his bloodstream and damage his heart
and other vital organs. Dental cleanings are critical for the cat's overall
health and not for cosmetic purposes.
Good luck.
Best regards,
---Cindy S. (who just arrived home with Amanda after Amanda's dental
cleaning, and now Amanda is very upset with her and is hiding under the
bed).

Newbie
July 13th 07, 04:08 PM
On Thu, 12 Jul 2007 17:50:09 -0400, "cybercat" > wrote:

>
>doofus" > wrote in message ...
>>I bought some enzymatic cat toothpaste and a soft bristle brush.
>>
>> My cat has had most of his teeth removed, before I got him, but the
>> remaining ones are red and sore looking near the gum line.
>>
>> I am hurting or helping by brushing his teeth? I know it is painful to
>> him, even though I am gentle.
>>
>> Should I continue to do it once a day?
>>
>
>A vet would have told you that you do not need to brush with
>enzymatic toothpaste. Just get it in his mouth.


Actually domestic cats can develop a refractory periodontal condition.

The name currently escapes me but the nature of the disease is believed
to be auto-immune. The only treatment for these cases is to extract all teeth.

Not saying that this is the case with your particular cat, but it is something
to keep in mind. Never use human toothpaste in cats or dogs as they
cannot spit out the foam.

Get your cat checked by a vet who knows more about veterinary dentistry
than the average bear.

cybercat
July 13th 07, 04:46 PM
"Newbie" > wrote
>>
>>A vet would have told you that you do not need to brush with
>>enzymatic toothpaste. Just get it in his mouth.
>
>
> Actually domestic cats can develop a refractory periodontal condition.

Is this at odds with what I wrote? I was just talking about the toothpaste,
and the fact that you don't need to actually brush the teeth.


>
> The name currently escapes me but the nature of the disease is believed
> to be auto-immune. The only treatment for these cases is to extract all
> teeth.

Of course there are lots of serious dental problems cats can develop, but
the OP is unlikely to know anything about them, given his belligerant
posturing
about us assholes who have the nerve to suggest he take the cat to the vet.
>

cindys
July 13th 07, 11:07 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Newbie" > wrote
>>>
>>>A vet would have told you that you do not need to brush with
>>>enzymatic toothpaste. Just get it in his mouth.
>>
>>
>> Actually domestic cats can develop a refractory periodontal condition.
>
> Is this at odds with what I wrote? I was just talking about the
> toothpaste,
> and the fact that you don't need to actually brush the teeth.
>
>
>>
>> The name currently escapes me but the nature of the disease is believed
>> to be auto-immune. The only treatment for these cases is to extract all
>> teeth.
>
> Of course there are lots of serious dental problems cats can develop, but
> the OP is unlikely to know anything about them, given his belligerant
> posturing
> about us assholes who have the nerve to suggest he take the cat to the
> vet.
-------
I completely missed that. I didn't read far enough down the post.
Best regards,
---Cindy S.

cybercat
July 14th 07, 12:35 AM
"cindys" > wrote
>> about us assholes who have the nerve to suggest he take the cat to the
>> vet.
> -------
> I completely missed that. I didn't read far enough down the post.

I thought your post was very good. I thought the OP's comments about
"greedy vets" were nothing more than the lame rationalizations of a greedy
bahstahd who is looking to justify not taking care of his cat if it means
spending money.