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View Full Version : Have had new adult shy cat one wk,still hiding bed


Gregg
July 21st 07, 02:39 AM
Graice my new adopte Tabby cat 3 yrs old still hids under neath the
queen size bed in the master bedroom, she is a very shy cat she moves
very fast, her nickname we call her but not to her just for us is
Rocket, she is that fast runer, Even when she is out from the bed she
is still shy and when either me or my wife want to pet her when she is
out, she will dart back to under neath the bed; she has come part way
out for treats and to be petted, pease I need a lot of advice, we both
love our new cat.

Gail
July 21st 07, 02:40 AM
Keep her in the one room. Feed her there and spend quiet time with her. It
will take patience. Get an interactive toy and play with her (feather on the
wand is a good one.)
Gail
"Gregg" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Graice my new adopte Tabby cat 3 yrs old still hids under neath the
> queen size bed in the master bedroom, she is a very shy cat she moves
> very fast, her nickname we call her but not to her just for us is
> Rocket, she is that fast runer, Even when she is out from the bed she
> is still shy and when either me or my wife want to pet her when she is
> out, she will dart back to under neath the bed; she has come part way
> out for treats and to be petted, pease I need a lot of advice, we both
> love our new cat.
>

cybercat
July 21st 07, 03:05 AM
"Gregg" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Graice my new adopte Tabby cat 3 yrs old still hids under neath the
> queen size bed in the master bedroom, she is a very shy cat she moves
> very fast, her nickname we call her but not to her just for us is
> Rocket, she is that fast runer, Even when she is out from the bed she
> is still shy and when either me or my wife want to pet her when she is
> out, she will dart back to under neath the bed;


My cat, also a tabby named Gracie, whom I adopted at 1-2 years old,
was and is the same way. From running away all the time, she has gone
to seeking me out for petting when she is in the mood for it, and will
actually stretch out beside me in bed and just go "boneless," lying on
the bed beside my pillow and purring up a storm. She weighs maybe
7.3 lbs. It's so cute.

One thing I did WRONG in the beginning was, when I could get her,
scoop her up and love all over her! Cats hate that. :) Now when I
catch her I just pet her and praise her and do not scoop her up and
kiss her, and I find she is less apt to run.


>she has come part way
> out for treats and to be petted, pease I need a lot of advice, we both
> love our new cat.
>

You know, this is really good for a shy cat to do inside of one week.
Bless you for adopting an adult, so many people want kittens, the adults
often go unadopted. I'd love to see photos if you have any up.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Cheryl
July 21st 07, 03:27 AM
On Fri 20 Jul 2007 09:39:04p, Gregg wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
ups.com>:

> Graice my new adopte Tabby cat 3 yrs old still hids under neath
> the queen size bed in the master bedroom, she is a very shy cat
> she moves very fast, her nickname we call her but not to her
> just for us is Rocket, she is that fast runer, Even when she is
> out from the bed she is still shy and when either me or my wife
> want to pet her when she is out, she will dart back to under
> neath the bed; she has come part way out for treats and to be
> petted, pease I need a lot of advice, we both love our new cat.
>
>

Cats are like this sometimes. You have to accept that you have
given her a home, and let her come around in her terms. As an
example, my sister took in a stray that promptly hid, came out at
night to eat, drink, and use the litterbox. He was basically a
ghost for about 2 years. She learned to accept that he wasn't
social. No one ever saw him. She didn't even see him. But now it
is about 7 years later, and he loves his people, but when strangers
are around, he disappears. This made it hard recently when she
moved, because he hid and we couldn't find him, and she was in her
new place for 2 days and could only go to the old place and leave
food and water and clean the litterbox before she could find him
and bring him to her new home. Sometimes they are just hidey. It
doesn't mean they aren't having a good life. Even cats in the wild
will spend most of their time hiding between hunting and eating.

--
Cheryl

John Doe
August 4th 07, 08:42 AM
Cheryl > wrote:

> On Fri 20 Jul 2007 09:39:04p, Gregg wrote in
> rec.pets.cats.health+behav
> ups.com>:
>
>> Graice my new adopte Tabby cat 3 yrs old still hids under neath
>> the queen size bed in the master bedroom, she is a very shy cat
>> she moves very fast, her nickname we call her but not to her just
>> for us is Rocket, she is that fast runer, Even when she is out from
>> the bed she is still shy and when either me or my wife want to pet
>> her when she is out, she will dart back to under neath the bed; she
>> has come part way out for treats and to be petted, pease I need a
>> lot of advice, we both love our new cat.

If my current feral female came out to be petted or even for food,
that would be a miracle. And if the food wasn't in the usual location,
she would get very hungry before eating.

> Cats are like this sometimes. You have to accept that you have given
> her a home, and let her come around in her terms. As an example, my
> sister took in a stray that promptly hid, came out at night to eat,
> drink, and use the litterbox. He was basically a ghost for about 2
> years. She learned to accept that he wasn't social. No one ever saw
> him. She didn't even see him. But now it is about 7 years later,
> and he loves his people, but when strangers are around, he
> disappears. This made it hard recently when she moved, because he
> hid and we couldn't find him, and she was in her new place for 2
> days and could only go to the old place and leave food and water and
> clean the litterbox before she could find him and bring him to her
> new home. Sometimes they are just hidey. It doesn't mean they aren't
> having a good life. Even cats in the wild will spend most of their
> time hiding between hunting and eating.

I think it's the difference between feral and stray. I wasn't familiar
with ferals until recently. Thought I had a stray that had been
beaten. Now I can fairly clearly see and understand that it's feral
(don't know whether it has been beaten, but I can see that it is
wild).

A temporary tomcat I had before this female recluse had one peculiar
trait. When I brought it food, it could tell food is in the area, but
it didn't recognize me as the provider (it's definitely not blind).
Most hungry cats will look at you and the food bowl in anticipation. A
feral might not recognize a human being as a food provider even when
the food is in hand.

My current female probably would rather be completely hidden too (most
of the time it is left alone, and currently there is an infant room
monitor in the area so I have a clue about what it's doing). It
usually gets warning before I enter the room so it can scamper away
from its reinforced window screen and up into its hideaway loft. The
idea it will be two years before it acts like a pet sounds about right
at the rate it's going. I feel sorry for the thing, but it's probably
not as lonely as it looks, and it is being provided a view/smell of
the outdoors and very good accommodations compared to what it had.
There's a house cat in there somewhere behind those fearful (and
otherwise expressionless) dark eyes.

The part about a feral hiding most of the time even when it is outside
sounds about right, thanks for another clue. I wish I could tell
better when my female was stressed, like being able to always see/know
its respiration rate, but oh well. Avoiding eye contact helps, but
that's difficult when you're trying to tell how it's doing. Need to
use my camera to do a little study.

Giving a cat space based on the idea that if it were outside it
could/might run away to avoid contact or whatever, probably keeps the
cat from feeling a need to run away when it has a chance. Then it
feels good being able to open a door without the cat trying to get
outside (especially in front of company). And maybe that goes double
for ferals.

I'm glad your sister was able to rescue the cat again.