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View Full Version : Taking Hyperthyroid Cat off of Beta Blockers--Update


cybercat
August 9th 07, 01:36 AM
After the vet determined that her thyroid levels are still within normal
limits and have remained consistent now for several years, she did another
ultrasound and an EKG and the results show that there has been no change in
her heart in those years. (She had an ultrasound of her heart just after
going on medication to correct her thryoid because she began to have little
fainting spells that the vet said were due to tachycardia that had developed
from having the hyperthyroid undiagnosed for several years. The vete gave
her propanolol, a beta blocker, to keep her heart rate even and a bit slower
than it would normally be.)

All of this was done because the vet told me several months ago that the
heart problem was reversable in many cats with hyperthyroid and they could
be taken off the beta blockers.

However, my husband and I had a talk before I took Boo in for a final
consultation today, and we agreed that she has been frisky and appears
healthier and happier than ever before now, at age 12. Since she is doing so
well, he asked me to ask the vet what the benefits of taking her off the
propanolol were.

According to my vet, there really are no benefits to taking her off, except
having to purchase and give her one less pill a day. Some cats become
lethargic on beta blockers, but this has not been the case with Boo. And, I
have to give her thryoid medication twice a day anyway. The proper dose is
half a pill of each twice a day, so I just dose her right before I feed her.

We've decided to keep her on the beta blockers for now.

On the bad side, she howled and panted and raised such a fuss on the way to
and from the vet that I nearly had a heart attack. She also sank two claws
into the heal of my hand deep when I put it where she could touch it
throught he door of the cat carrier. I have never screamed and driven at the
same time before. She is fine now, as are the holes in my hand after some
peroxide.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

Cheryl
August 9th 07, 03:17 AM
On Wed 08 Aug 2007 08:36:15p, cybercat wrote in
rec.pets.cats.health+behav
>:

> We've decided to keep her on the beta blockers for now.
>
> On the bad side, she howled and panted and raised such a fuss on
> the way to and from the vet that I nearly had a heart attack.
> She also sank two claws into the heal of my hand deep when I put
> it where she could touch it throught he door of the cat carrier.
> I have never screamed and driven at the same time before. She is
> fine now, as are the holes in my hand after some peroxide.

No advice, just best wishes for Boo. I do that, too, put my hand in
the carrier to try to calm a singing kitty when they have to be in
the car.

--
Cheryl

saxrocco via CatKB.com
August 9th 07, 09:36 PM
Purrs to Boo and hope she keeps fine.
Hope your hand is OK?
I have experienced a few of those pains over the years, but you take it from
your babies don't you?

Clare x


Cheryl wrote:
>> We've decided to keep her on the beta blockers for now.
>>
>[quoted text clipped - 4 lines]
>> I have never screamed and driven at the same time before. She is
>> fine now, as are the holes in my hand after some peroxide.
>
>No advice, just best wishes for Boo. I do that, too, put my hand in
>the carrier to try to calm a singing kitty when they have to be in
>the car.
>

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200708/1

CatNipped[_2_]
August 13th 07, 08:17 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
.. .
> After the vet determined that her thyroid levels are still within normal
> limits and have remained consistent now for several years, she did another
> ultrasound and an EKG and the results show that there has been no change
> in her heart in those years. (She had an ultrasound of her heart just
> after going on medication to correct her thryoid because she began to have
> little fainting spells that the vet said were due to tachycardia that had
> developed from having the hyperthyroid undiagnosed for several years. The
> vete gave her propanolol, a beta blocker, to keep her heart rate even and
> a bit slower than it would normally be.)
>
> All of this was done because the vet told me several months ago that the
> heart problem was reversable in many cats with hyperthyroid and they could
> be taken off the beta blockers.
>
> However, my husband and I had a talk before I took Boo in for a final
> consultation today, and we agreed that she has been frisky and appears
> healthier and happier than ever before now, at age 12. Since she is doing
> so well, he asked me to ask the vet what the benefits of taking her off
> the propanolol were.
>
> According to my vet, there really are no benefits to taking her off,
> except having to purchase and give her one less pill a day. Some cats
> become lethargic on beta blockers, but this has not been the case with
> Boo. And, I have to give her thryoid medication twice a day anyway. The
> proper dose is half a pill of each twice a day, so I just dose her right
> before I feed her.
>
> We've decided to keep her on the beta blockers for now.
>
> On the bad side, she howled and panted and raised such a fuss on the way
> to and from the vet that I nearly had a heart attack. She also sank two
> claws into the heal of my hand deep when I put it where she could touch it
> throught he door of the cat carrier. I have never screamed and driven at
> the same time before. She is fine now, as are the holes in my hand after
> some peroxide.

I agree with you and your husband (not that you need my agreement ;>). If
there is no health benefits to taking her off the medicine, and she's
feeling good, then I would leave her on it too.

Keep a watch on your hand for any infections - in puncture wounds the
infection will start from the bottom up and you might not catch it early
enough (have you had a tetanus shot in the last 10 year?).

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
>
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
>

cybercat
August 14th 07, 04:57 PM
"CatNipped" > wrote
> I agree with you and your husband (not that you need my agreement ;>). If
> there is no health benefits to taking her off the medicine, and she's
> feeling good, then I would leave her on it too.
>
> Keep a watch on your hand for any infections - in puncture wounds the
> infection will start from the bottom up and you might not catch it early
> enough (have you had a tetanus shot in the last 10 year?).
>

I grow roses! So, yes, I have had a tetanus shot recently, thanks for
asking.

As soon as I got home that day, I set the carrier on the kitchen table,
washed
my wounds and applied peroxide until it bubbled well, then got Boo out of
the carrier and lay on the couch with her on my chest, having a talk with
her,
calming her down, telling her I understood why she punctured me, etc. The
really bad thing is, this is one of those cats who is not quite efficient at
retracting
her claws--she is always getting them caught on our shirts and then hissing
when
we try to get her loose, hahaha! So for a long few seconds, I was drinving
down
the road, screaming (and I do not generally scream ... heh) and she was
howling,
freaked out, with her claws still caught in my skin.

It was a sucky day for everyone! But we are all better now. My hand is
healing
quickly, too.

Sheelagh >o
August 14th 07, 06:25 PM
On 9 Aug, 01:36, "cybercat" > wrote:
> After the vet determined that her thyroid levels are still within normal
> limits and have remained consistent now for several years, she did another
> ultrasound and an EKG and the results show that there has been no change in
> her heart in those years. (She had an ultrasound of her heart just after
> going on medication to correct her thryoid because she began to have little
> fainting spells that the vet said were due to tachycardia that had developed
> from having the hyperthyroid undiagnosed for several years. The vete gave
> her propanolol, a beta blocker, to keep her heart rate even and a bit slower
> than it would normally be.)
>
> All of this was done because the vet told me several months ago that the
> heart problem was reversable in many cats with hyperthyroid and they could
> be taken off the beta blockers.
>
> However, my husband and I had a talk before I took Boo in for a final
> consultation today, and we agreed that she has been frisky and appears
> healthier and happier than ever before now, at age 12. Since she is doing so
> well, he asked me to ask the vet what the benefits of taking her off the
> propanolol were.
>
> According to my vet, there really are no benefits to taking her off, except
> having to purchase and give her one less pill a day. Some cats become
> lethargic on beta blockers, but this has not been the case with Boo. And, I
> have to give her thryoid medication twice a day anyway. The proper dose is
> half a pill of each twice a day, so I just dose her right before I feed her.
>
> We've decided to keep her on the beta blockers for now.
>
> On the bad side, she howled and panted and raised such a fuss on the way to
> and from the vet that I nearly had a heart attack. She also sank two claws
> into the heal of my hand deep when I put it where she could touch it
> throught he door of the cat carrier. I have never screamed and driven at the
> same time before. She is fine now, as are the holes in my hand after some
> peroxide.
>
> --
> Posted via a free Usenet account fromhttp://www.teranews.com

Other than the puncture wounds ( which we all suffer occasionally as
their slave's), I am delighted to hear that Boo is doing so well on
her Meds. With no relative side effects, I feel your choice is the
right one too. All the best to both of them, but an extra scritch for
Boo this time. Driving, slaving, & talking are all rather hard whilst
trying to do them all @ the same time-well done :o)
Sheelagh >"o"<

CatNipped[_2_]
August 14th 07, 09:21 PM
"cybercat" > wrote in message
...
>
> "CatNipped" > wrote
>> I agree with you and your husband (not that you need my agreement ;>).
>> If there is no health benefits to taking her off the medicine, and she's
>> feeling good, then I would leave her on it too.
>>
>> Keep a watch on your hand for any infections - in puncture wounds the
>> infection will start from the bottom up and you might not catch it early
>> enough (have you had a tetanus shot in the last 10 year?).
>>
>
> I grow roses! So, yes, I have had a tetanus shot recently, thanks for
> asking.
>
> As soon as I got home that day, I set the carrier on the kitchen table,
> washed
> my wounds and applied peroxide until it bubbled well, then got Boo out of
> the carrier and lay on the couch with her on my chest, having a talk with
> her,
> calming her down, telling her I understood why she punctured me, etc. The
> really bad thing is, this is one of those cats who is not quite efficient
> at retracting
> her claws--she is always getting them caught on our shirts and then
> hissing when
> we try to get her loose, hahaha!

Jessie is the same way, but I sometimes wonder is she's not being a drama
queen because she only does this when DH is around (her daddy). If I'm the
one who tries to unhook her she usually unhooks herself and then bitches at
me. ;>

> So for a long few seconds, I was drinving down
> the road, screaming (and I do not generally scream ... heh) and she was
> howling,
> freaked out, with her claws still caught in my skin.
>
> It was a sucky day for everyone! But we are all better now. My hand is
> healing
> quickly, too.

Kewl! I'm glad your wounds are healing - I've had quite a few myself when
Bandit was still with us, so I can well sympathize!

Hugs,

CatNipped

>
>