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FourCatServant via CatKB.com
August 9th 07, 07:22 AM
I have four 1 year and 5 months old cats. They were adoptede 2 by 2 a day
apart. They were all 6 weeks old and all got along. I am now babysitting a
cat for an undetermined amount of time who is 3 months old. There is alot of
hissing and grunting. One of my cats has accepted the new addition. They even
eat out of the same bowl. What can I do help the other three accept this
house guest?

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FourCatServant via CatKB.com
August 9th 07, 02:23 PM
FourCatServant wrote:
>I have four 1 year and 5 months old cats. They were adoptede 2 by 2 a day
>apart. They were all 6 weeks old and all got along. I am now babysitting a
>cat for an undetermined amount of time who is 3 months old. There is alot of
>hissing and grunting. One of my cats has accepted the new addition. They even
>eat out of the same bowl. What can I do help the other three accept this
>house guest?

I have exchanged toys to get them familiar with each others scent. Put them
on opposite sides of the door. Use treats to do all this. What else can I do?

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Rene S.
August 9th 07, 05:29 PM
Rub them all with the same towel to further exchange scents. Play with
them when they are on opposite sides of the door (dangle something
near the bottom of the door so their paws touch). Is it just hissing
or are they being aggressive toward the newcomer?

It sounds like you're making progress since one has already accepted
the new kitty. Give them a little more time to adjust. Cats are
creatures of habit and can adapt slowly to change.

FourCatServant via CatKB.com
August 9th 07, 06:38 PM
Rene S. wrote:
>Rub them all with the same towel to further exchange scents. Play with
>them when they are on opposite sides of the door (dangle something
>near the bottom of the door so their paws touch). Is it just hissing
>or are they being aggressive toward the newcomer?
>
>It sounds like you're making progress since one has already accepted
>the new kitty. Give them a little more time to adjust. Cats are
>creatures of habit and can adapt slowly to change.

The older cats just hiss at him. What I find funny is the newcomer (Stormie..
found in a tree after a bad thunderstorm) is the aggressive one. I let
stormie out of his ensiute and was walking around sniffing things out and
Tigger the friendly adult cat just sniffed his butt. Stormie begian his
gurgle type hiss. Tiger did not react and just sat next to him cocking his
head side to side. Than stormie stuck his tail and but in Tiggers face hissed
and wacked my poor curoius tiger.

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saxrocco via CatKB.com
August 9th 07, 09:10 PM
This is interesting for when we get another addition to our house because I
am worried on how Rover will take to another cat or cats.
I guess you got to let them get used to one another and treat them all the
same....A bit like kids I guess?
I got the one child and only the one cat now :-(

Clare x


Rene S. wrote:
>Rub them all with the same towel to further exchange scents. Play with
>them when they are on opposite sides of the door (dangle something
>near the bottom of the door so their paws touch). Is it just hissing
>or are they being aggressive toward the newcomer?
>
>It sounds like you're making progress since one has already accepted
>the new kitty. Give them a little more time to adjust. Cats are
>creatures of habit and can adapt slowly to change.

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Rene S.
August 9th 07, 09:51 PM
> The older cats just hiss at him. What I find funny is the newcomer (Stormie..
> found in a tree after a bad thunderstorm) is the aggressive one. I let
> stormie out of his ensiute and was walking around sniffing things out and
> Tigger the friendly adult cat just sniffed his butt. Stormie begian his
> gurgle type hiss. Tiger did not react and just sat next to him cocking his
> head side to side. Than stormie stuck his tail and but in Tiggers face hissed
> and wacked my poor curoius tiger.

Trying to post again--am having some troubles with Google. Sorry if
there are any duplicate posts. . .

If it's just hissing, it isn't too serious. I would still put Stormie
in a separate room when you're not in the house as a safety measure.
Try and play with them together. The exercise will tire them out so
there is less pent-up energy, and will also bond you with them. When
they interact nicely together, praise them and make a big fuss. It
sounds lame, but I've done it and it does help--positive reinforcement.

FourCatServant via CatKB.com
August 10th 07, 01:39 AM
I am implimenting all the suggestions you have kindly given me. Stormie is
teh aggressive part of the equation. I will keep everyone posted.

Thanks for all the advice.

Rene S. wrote:
>> The older cats just hiss at him. What I find funny is the newcomer (Stormie..
>> found in a tree after a bad thunderstorm) is the aggressive one. I let
>[quoted text clipped - 3 lines]
>> head side to side. Than stormie stuck his tail and but in Tiggers face hissed
>> and wacked my poor curoius tiger.
>
>Trying to post again--am having some troubles with Google. Sorry if
>there are any duplicate posts. . .
>
>If it's just hissing, it isn't too serious. I would still put Stormie
>in a separate room when you're not in the house as a safety measure.
>Try and play with them together. The exercise will tire them out so
>there is less pent-up energy, and will also bond you with them. When
>they interact nicely together, praise them and make a big fuss. It
>sounds lame, but I've done it and it does help--positive reinforcement.

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