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View Full Version : Cystitis and excessive belly licking


jmc
August 19th 07, 12:40 PM
Regulars here know Meep has cystitis. I've been noting a thinning of
hair on her belly, about where her bladder is. It isn't self-mutilation
- yet - it's just short hairs, but no skin damage. I pointed this out
to the vet and she indicated that this could indeed be caused by
discomfort from cystitis, but did not recommend any treatment at this
time. The treatment she'd suggest is anti-inflammatories, and I guess
that's to be avoided for as long as possible, due to the stress this
therapy places on kidneys and liver.

I'm bothered by this though - it's a visible indication that she's
uncomfortable, even if she's not showing clinical signs. She's licked
to the point of self-mutilation before, so I'm keeping a close eye on this.

She's been eating almost only wet food for a couple of weeks, but it
hasn't made a difference to this behavior. Is it too soon?

Is there anything I could give her to either make her more comfortable,
or at least to keep her from licking?

Please don't suggest a second opinion - would if I could. This is the
best of the two vet clinics in town. The next nearest is a plane flight
away.

jmc

bookie
August 19th 07, 04:34 PM
On 19 Aug, 12:40, jmc > wrote:
> Regulars here know Meep has cystitis. I've been noting a thinning of
> hair on her belly, about where her bladder is. It isn't self-mutilation
> - yet - it's just short hairs, but no skin damage. I pointed this out
> to the vet and she indicated that this could indeed be caused by
> discomfort from cystitis, but did not recommend any treatment at this
> time. The treatment she'd suggest is anti-inflammatories, and I guess
> that's to be avoided for as long as possible, due to the stress this
> therapy places on kidneys and liver.
>
> I'm bothered by this though - it's a visible indication that she's
> uncomfortable, even if she's not showing clinical signs. She's licked
> to the point of self-mutilation before, so I'm keeping a close eye on this.
>
> She's been eating almost only wet food for a couple of weeks, but it
> hasn't made a difference to this behavior. Is it too soon?
>
> Is there anything I could give her to either make her more comfortable,
> or at least to keep her from licking?
>
> Please don't suggest a second opinion - would if I could. This is the
> best of the two vet clinics in town. The next nearest is a plane flight
> away.
>
> jmc

i think it is a case of 'trest the cystitis and the licking to excess
will then stop' AFAIK she is licking that spot because she is in great
pain and discomfort there and it is the only way to distract herself
from the pain inside, so if the cause of the pain is sorted out ie the
cystitis, then she will no longer have the need to lick there so much
as the pain will have gone.

is your vet not treating her for cystitis? if not why? demand to know
why, and also ask about painkillers for your cat, a doctor wold give a
human patient in such pain some sort of painkiller so why not for a
cat who is obviously is a great of distress. please go back to your
vet and ask about this, your cat is obviously in pain and the vet can
do something to help if they can be bothered.

bookie

bookie
August 19th 07, 04:35 PM
On 19 Aug, 12:40, jmc > wrote:
> Regulars here know Meep has cystitis. I've been noting a thinning of
> hair on her belly, about where her bladder is. It isn't self-mutilation
> - yet - it's just short hairs, but no skin damage. I pointed this out
> to the vet and she indicated that this could indeed be caused by
> discomfort from cystitis, but did not recommend any treatment at this
> time. The treatment she'd suggest is anti-inflammatories, and I guess
> that's to be avoided for as long as possible, due to the stress this
> therapy places on kidneys and liver.
>
> I'm bothered by this though - it's a visible indication that she's
> uncomfortable, even if she's not showing clinical signs. She's licked
> to the point of self-mutilation before, so I'm keeping a close eye on this.
>
> She's been eating almost only wet food for a couple of weeks, but it
> hasn't made a difference to this behavior. Is it too soon?
>
> Is there anything I could give her to either make her more comfortable,
> or at least to keep her from licking?
>
> Please don't suggest a second opinion - would if I could. This is the
> best of the two vet clinics in town. The next nearest is a plane flight
> away.
>
> jmc

also your vet sounds like a cretin, if your cat is in such discomfort
now that they are continually lickign a spot to relieve the pain it is
obviously time that treatment for the cystitis started.

Rene S.
August 20th 07, 08:16 PM
> I'm bothered by this though - it's a visible indication that she's
> uncomfortable, even if she's not showing clinical signs. She's licked
> to the point of self-mutilation before, so I'm keeping a close eye on this.
>
> She's been eating almost only wet food for a couple of weeks, but it
> hasn't made a difference to this behavior. Is it too soon?
>
> Is there anything I could give her to either make her more comfortable,
> or at least to keep her from licking?

While I admit that I don't know a lot about Meep's condition, it does
sound like she's uncomfortable. Have you asked your vet about her
taking a low-dose pain medication, that you could give when she starts
licking? It may or may not work, but it might be worth a try. The only
thing you could probably do to stop the licking is have her wear an E-
collar, but that might make her stressed and end up making things
worse.

Poor gal. Hope she's feeling better soon.

Catman 07
August 28th 07, 10:26 AM
On Sun, 19 Aug 2007 21:10:43 +0930, jmc
> wrote:

>Regulars here know Meep has cystitis. I've been noting a thinning of
>hair on her belly, about where her bladder is. It isn't self-mutilation
>- yet - it's just short hairs, but no skin damage. I pointed this out
>to the vet and she indicated that this could indeed be caused by
>discomfort from cystitis, but did not recommend any treatment at this
>time. The treatment she'd suggest is anti-inflammatories, and I guess
>that's to be avoided for as long as possible, due to the stress this
>therapy places on kidneys and liver.

JMC, I'm feeding my cat wild pacific canned salmon AS an
anti-inflammatory, from its high omega 3 content. You might try that.

>
>I'm bothered by this though - it's a visible indication that she's
>uncomfortable, even if she's not showing clinical signs. She's licked
>to the point of self-mutilation before, so I'm keeping a close eye on this.
>
>She's been eating almost only wet food for a couple of weeks, but it
>hasn't made a difference to this behavior. Is it too soon?
>
>Is there anything I could give her to either make her more comfortable,
>or at least to keep her from licking?

If your cat were human, I'm sure cranberry juice would be recommended
as a home remedy for cystitis. I don't know if cats will even drink
cranberry juice. I would really like to know if anyone has tried
this, as my cat has cystitis too, imho, as there is blood in his
urine.

Considering that cats are carnivores, what they like is surprising. I
wouldn't have imagined that my cat would like boiled broccoli, but, as
it turns out, he LOVES it! I only give him a little bit of the
florets, and he actually likes it BETTER than salmon.
Catman

>
>Please don't suggest a second opinion - would if I could. This is the
>best of the two vet clinics in town. The next nearest is a plane flight
>away.
>
>jmc

Rene S.
August 28th 07, 09:57 PM
> JMC, I'm feeding my cat wild pacific canned salmon AS an
> anti-inflammatory, from its high omega 3 content. You might try that.

This is a bad idea and you should stop feeding your cat canned salmon.
Fish is high in magnesium and is thought to contribute to urinary
tract crystal formation. Also, the cat probably isn't eating enough
quanitity of salmon to offer any kind of Omega-3 benefit. An Omega-
fatty acid supplement might be helpful, but it should be one
formulated specifically for cats. One brand that is very good is
Eicosaderm. Countrysidepet.com has a good price on these.

You should read this artlcle about managing urinary tract issues in
cats:
http://community-2.webtv.net/getcathelp/urinarytract/

A good diet you might try is Nature's Variety raw
(www.naturesvariety.com). A high-protein raw diet tends to acidify the
urine naturally and might be helpful to you. Feeding raw takes a bit
of care, but it's not difficult. I feed this brand myself with great
results. If you have any questions about raw diets, please email me.

johnnaoleary via CatKB.com
August 29th 07, 06:34 AM
Sorry to hear that your kitty is sick. Cystitis can be difficult to treat. My
cat had recurring UTIs for almost a year before we got it under control.
After switching vets I was advised that he should be given a 30 day course of
antibiotics to ensure that the infection is completely gone. Treating for 7-
10 days usually is enough to get rid of the symptoms for a while but not
always enough to completely cure the infection, particularly for interstitial
cystitis. A 30 day course of zeniquin finally cured my kitty. He suffered for
almost a year with UTIs but has been healthy for a couple of years now. Best
of luck. Let us know how Meep gets along.
Johnna :)

jmc wrote:
>Regulars here know Meep has cystitis. I've been noting a thinning of
>hair on her belly, about where her bladder is. It isn't self-mutilation
>- yet - it's just short hairs, but no skin damage. I pointed this out
>to the vet and she indicated that this could indeed be caused by
>discomfort from cystitis, but did not recommend any treatment at this
>time. The treatment she'd suggest is anti-inflammatories, and I guess
>that's to be avoided for as long as possible, due to the stress this
>therapy places on kidneys and liver.
>
>I'm bothered by this though - it's a visible indication that she's
>uncomfortable, even if she's not showing clinical signs. She's licked
>to the point of self-mutilation before, so I'm keeping a close eye on this.
>
>She's been eating almost only wet food for a couple of weeks, but it
>hasn't made a difference to this behavior. Is it too soon?
>
>Is there anything I could give her to either make her more comfortable,
>or at least to keep her from licking?
>
>Please don't suggest a second opinion - would if I could. This is the
>best of the two vet clinics in town. The next nearest is a plane flight
>away.
>
>jmc

--
Message posted via CatKB.com
http://www.catkb.com/Uwe/Forums.aspx/cat-health/200708/1

Catman 07
August 29th 07, 02:38 PM
On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 13:57:35 -0700, "Rene S."
> wrote:

>> JMC, I'm feeding my cat wild pacific canned salmon AS an
>> anti-inflammatory, from its high omega 3 content. You might try that.
>
>This is a bad idea and you should stop feeding your cat canned salmon.
>Fish is high in magnesium and is thought to contribute to urinary
>tract crystal formation. Also, the cat probably isn't eating enough
>quanitity of salmon to offer any kind of Omega-3 benefit. An Omega-
>fatty acid supplement might be helpful, but it should be one
>formulated specifically for cats. One brand that is very good is
>Eicosaderm. Countrysidepet.com has a good price on these.
>
>You should read this artlcle about managing urinary tract issues in
>cats:
>http://community-2.webtv.net/getcathelp/urinarytract/
>
>A good diet you might try is Nature's Variety raw
>(www.naturesvariety.com). A high-protein raw diet tends to acidify the
>urine naturally and might be helpful to you. Feeding raw takes a bit
>of care, but it's not difficult. I feed this brand myself with great
>results. If you have any questions about raw diets, please email me.

Thanks, Rene. A raw meat diet makes a lot of sense. Feeding cats
grains is a REALLY dumb idea, imho.

The magnesium issue certainly complicates feeding salmon. I'll have to
look into that a LOT more. Thanks for the headsup.
Catman