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Suzie-Q[_2_]
August 24th 07, 02:53 PM
Can anyone give me any pros or cons regarding using a Flea Bomb
in a bedroom? I'm concerned that I'll never be able to lay (lie?)
in my bed again.

I currently have a Hartz Flea Bomb I'm planning to use. Good or
bad?

Thanks,
--

8^)~ Sue (remove the x to email)
~~~~
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Sheelagh >o
August 24th 07, 05:32 PM
On 24 Aug, 16:28, "cindys" > wrote:
> "Suzie-Q" > wrote in message
>
> ...> Can anyone give me any pros or cons regarding using a Flea Bomb
> > in a bedroom? I'm concerned that I'll never be able to lay (lie?)
> > in my bed again.
>
> > I currently have a Hartz Flea Bomb I'm planning to use. Good or
> > bad?
>
> -------
> You should not need a flea bomb if you take your cats to the vet and have
> them treated with Revolution or one of the other flea-preventive/flea
> killers. The fleas want to go on the cat (not you) and if the cat is
> available, they will jump on the cat, bite him, and then die. If you have a
> major infestation, you will continue to see new fleas for a while as the
> eggs hatch. Make sure you vacuum a lot as the vibration from the vacuum
> cleaner causes the eggs to hatch and the emergent fleas are then able to
> bite the cat and will be vulnerable to the Revolution/Advantage. If it would
> make you feel better to use a flea bomb in addition to all of this, then go
> ahead, but just make sure that you and the cats are out of your house for 24
> hours (or whatever it says on the package). Also, be aware that fleas jump
> and move. So, treating only your bedroom would not be sufficient. You would
> need to treat the entire house. In your shoes, I would call an exterminator
> if I felt that I needed to kill the fleas in the bedroom. But the most
> important thing is treating the cats. If you don't do that, you will never
> get rid of the fleas no mater how many flea bombs you use or exterminators
> you phone.And please make sure that the product you use on your cats comes
> from the veterinarian and not from the store (like Hartz). The
> over-the-counter stuff contains insecticide and can kill your cat.
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.

I have never heard of flea bombs before. Can anyone give me more
information on where you would get one from, a good brand name, & also
the action it takes & whether you have to move out or not whilst they
are active?
You can get the local council to do the job of exterminating over
here, but it is fairly expensive. Having said that, it is fully
effective, so therefore worth the money if you have a problem. Be
warned, you need to have a clear a floor space as possible before
they arrive.
the cost? around 80 ($160)
Sheelagh>"o"<

AZ Nomad
August 25th 07, 04:51 PM
On Sat, 25 Aug 2007 02:11:48 -0400, Matthew > wrote:


>You are absolutely right Cindy when living in a apartment complex you
>almost have to treat the whole building

You don't. You only have to treat the areas where there are eggs. Fleas don't
travel in walls like roaches. They don't live on garbage or food remains. Take
away their supply of blood (humans and pets) and they'll quickly die off.

If the pets go outdoors then you have to comb off any fleas that might have
gotten on them every time they come indoors.

Sherry
August 26th 07, 03:05 PM
On Aug 24, 8:53 am, Suzie-Q > wrote:
> Can anyone give me any pros or cons regarding using a Flea Bomb
> in a bedroom? I'm concerned that I'll never be able to lay (lie?)
> in my bed again.
>
> I currently have a Hartz Flea Bomb I'm planning to use. Good or
> bad?
>
> Thanks,
> --
>
> 8^)~ Sue (remove the x to email)
> ~~~~

Hi Sue...how old are your cats? Are they health-compromised in any
way? If so, I wouldn't use the fogger. I dont
think personally that I'd use it anyway, because Hartz products just
creep me out. What's the active ingredient?
Do a little googling and see what turns up before you use it.
Here's what I did, for a moderate flea infestation, and it actually
worked: Vacuum thoroughly. Then vacuum thoroughly
again. Dump the bag outdoors. If you don't have a paper bag in your
vacuum, buy a Hartz flea collar and cut it up
in the bag. That's the only thing they're good for. Then steam clean
the area. Wash your bedding.
After all that, and the carpet dries, treat the area *under* the bed
and furniture with pesticide. Block it so the cats
can't get to it.
Keep vacuuming daily, treat the cats with Advantage.
I know this is a tremendous amount of work. We had no choice about
using pesticide because of Yoda. It did work.

Sherry

Sherry
August 26th 07, 06:38 PM
On Aug 26, 11:07 am, "cindys" > wrote:
> "Sherry" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
>
>
> > On Aug 24, 8:53 am, Suzie-Q > wrote:
> >> Can anyone give me any pros or cons regarding using a Flea Bomb
> >> in a bedroom? I'm concerned that I'll never be able to lay (lie?)
> >> in my bed again.
>
> >> I currently have a Hartz Flea Bomb I'm planning to use. Good or
> >> bad?
>
> >> Thanks,
> >> --
>
> >> 8^)~ Sue (remove the x to email)
> >> ~~~~
>
> > Hi Sue...how old are your cats? Are they health-compromised in any
> > way? If so, I wouldn't use the fogger. I dont
> > think personally that I'd use it anyway, because Hartz products just
> > creep me out. What's the active ingredient?
> > Do a little googling and see what turns up before you use it.
> > Here's what I did, for a moderate flea infestation, and it actually
> > worked: Vacuum thoroughly. Then vacuum thoroughly
> > again. Dump the bag outdoors. If you don't have a paper bag in your
> > vacuum, buy a Hartz flea collar and cut it up
> > in the bag. That's the only thing they're good for. Then steam clean
> > the area. Wash your bedding.
> > After all that, and the carpet dries, treat the area *under* the bed
> > and furniture with pesticide. Block it so the cats
> > can't get to it.
> > Keep vacuuming daily, treat the cats with Advantage.
> > I know this is a tremendous amount of work. We had no choice about
> > using pesticide because of Yoda. It did work.
>
> --------
> What you describe is not more work than using the fogger or having a
> professional exterminator. We had to cover things and open things and put
> things away and move things around in preparation for the de-fleaing. And
> then we had to do tons of vacuuming afterward. And with respect to steam
> cleaning the carpet, there are many companies that do it very cheaply, if
> she doesn't want to do it herself. So, my point is that I agree with you,
> and advising you not to overestimate the amount of work required by your
> method versus the fogger method (or hiring an exterminator). The advantage
> (no pun intended) that I can see of the exterminator (don't remember about
> the fogger) is the residual flea-killing. The shampoo is only going to kill
> what is in the carpeting at that moment. If something hatches afterward, the
> shampoo has no effect. Also, the fogger kills any fleas that are hiding in
> the furniture, which shampooing the carpet would not. But, I agree that I
> don't know that I would want to use the fogger if I had a medically
> compromised cat.
>
> When we had the flea infestation in our apartment, I found flea larva on one
> of my sweaters that was in the drawer, on the bath rug in the bathroom, and
> on the mattress of the bed when I pulled off the sheets. (So the bare
> mattress on the bed needs to be vacuumed as does the furniture). One day
> when I was at work, I saw a live flea crawling up the front of my dress.
> Gross!
> Best regards,
> ---Cindy S.- Hide quoted text -
>
The hardest part is moving the furniture out of the room. You pretty
much need to do that for it to be effective. And it
is not an instant solution. It's a decrease in the number of fleas,
you just have to be diligent with vacuuming, over,
and over and over, and hoping the ones that hop under the furniture
get zapped by the chemicals there. You've treated
the cats, and one day you just noticed there are NO more fleas. Yay.
I also bought flea traps, but honestly they
probably helped *some*, but not that much. Probably ideally there's
some kind of safer type of life-cycle spray that could be used
after you've done all the initial work, to keep the remaining fleas
from reproducing that would help.

Sherry

Rhonda[_3_]
August 26th 07, 09:17 PM
cindys wrote:

> When we had the flea infestation in our apartment, I found flea larva on one
> of my sweaters that was in the drawer, on the bath rug in the bathroom, and
> on the mattress of the bed when I pulled off the sheets.


OMG! I think I would just burn everything I owned and move.

Rhonda :)