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Grawun
August 24th 07, 03:05 PM
Does anyone have a cat with a hyperthyroid problem? Mine has been on
meds for some time but it seems now is the time I have to make a
decision about further treatment. Surgery, radiation, iodine
injection, whatever. Does anyone have some advice or information that
will help me make a good decision?

bookie
August 24th 07, 04:01 PM
On 24 Aug, 15:05, Grawun > wrote:
> Does anyone have a cat with a hyperthyroid problem? Mine has been on
> meds for some time but it seems now is the time I have to make a
> decision about further treatment. Surgery, radiation, iodine
> injection, whatever. Does anyone have some advice or information that
> will help me make a good decision?

i have had 2 cats with hyperthyroidism, one is still with me and in
fine fettle despite being about 16 years old, she still rules the
house with an iron paw.

both cats were/are on felimazole tablets twice a day and doing ok
really, i didn;t go for surgery or radioactive iodine treatment for
various reasons;
surgery was out of the question for both as they were so old and so
putting under egenral anaesthetic would have been risky (you do not
say how old your cat is).

with the radioactive iodine thing they have to be isolated for a
number of weeks which is a long time to a cat and the resulting stress
for either cat would not be wort it and may affect their chances of
recovery. certainly jasper the tom cat was a very clingy cat who loved
human company and after his previous bad experiences before he was
rescued it would have been positively cruel to put him in isolation
for any length of time, he would have died of a broken heart probably.

I don't mind pilling jessie twice a day, i hide the pills in soft
treats although she is ok about taking them as she gets a treat
straight after anyway for being such a good girl. This has been going
on for over 2 years since I got her and it just the way it goes, you
just adapt and get on with it really, pilling is not the big deal
people make it out to be.

hope that helps in some way
bookie

Rene S.
August 24th 07, 04:58 PM
On Aug 24, 9:05 am, Grawun > wrote:
> Does anyone have a cat with a hyperthyroid problem? Mine has been on
> meds for some time but it seems now is the time I have to make a
> decision about further treatment. Surgery, radiation, iodine
> injection, whatever. Does anyone have some advice or information that
> will help me make a good decision?

Might I ask why you feel you need to make a decision about an
alternative treatment? Is she having troubles with the medication or
other side effects, or does your vet feel she needs surgery? Have you
had troubles keeping her levels maintained?

My childhood cat was on thryoid medication for about two years, until
the time of her death. She did well and though she remained thin
despite being on medication, she was quite elderly and also had other
issues (aging kidneys), so we did not opt for surgery/radiation.

I recommend discussing your options with your vet. There are pros and
cons for each method. I found a web site that lists the treatment
options with the approximate cost. I personally think the costs they
list for the meds is high, but I guess it depends on your location:
http://www.catthyroid.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=TreatmentOptions

bookie
August 25th 07, 12:38 AM
On 24 Aug, 16:58, "Rene S." > wrote:
> On Aug 24, 9:05 am, Grawun > wrote:
>
> > Does anyone have a cat with a hyperthyroid problem? Mine has been on
> > meds for some time but it seems now is the time I have to make a
> > decision about further treatment. Surgery, radiation, iodine
> > injection, whatever. Does anyone have some advice or information that
> > will help me make a good decision?
>
> Might I ask why you feel you need to make a decision about an
> alternative treatment? Is she having troubles with the medication or
> other side effects, or does your vet feel she needs surgery? Have you
> had troubles keeping her levels maintained?
>
> My childhood cat was on thryoid medication for about two years, until
> the time of her death. She did well and though she remained thin
> despite being on medication, she was quite elderly and also had other
> issues (aging kidneys), so we did not opt for surgery/radiation.
>
> I recommend discussing your options with your vet. There are pros and
> cons for each method. I found a web site that lists the treatment
> options with the approximate cost. I personally think the costs they
> list for the meds is high, but I guess it depends on your location:http://www.catthyroid.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=TreatmentOptions

thats what i think, why go for surgery or whatever other drastic
option if she is doing ok on the medication? jessie is doing just fine
as was jasper (he died of something totally unrelated, tumour in his
bladder. at least i don't think it was related)

both the options of surgery and radioactive iodine treatment are quite
major and i wonder if there si any real need to put the poor lamb
through either of them.

Paul M. Cook
August 27th 07, 01:37 AM
"Grawun" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> Does anyone have a cat with a hyperthyroid problem? Mine has been on
> meds for some time but it seems now is the time I have to make a
> decision about further treatment. Surgery, radiation, iodine
> injection, whatever. Does anyone have some advice or information that
> will help me make a good decision?
>

My oldest cat, Buddy has been hyperthyroid for 4 years now. He takes pills
very well so I use that method and it keeps the condition completely in
check. His levels are all perfectly normal. If he was a tough cat to pill,
I'd have to consider something else. But we have out routine, every night
he gets his pills and he takes them like a champ.

Surgery is not an option as the vet tells me it is not possible to
differentiate thyroid with parathyroid. A cat cannot live without the
latter. So surgery is out.

Radiation therapy works great and is a true cure. If your cat survives it.
My vet discourages the practice because as she told me, they'd get a cat
back from the treatment center and too often it would die within a couple
weeks. She's not a risk taker and neither am I. Look long and hard into
this one. From what I learned, it is OK for young and strong cats but it
does come with a risk of death. Read a lot, get a lot of professional
opinions on this one.

Paul

Paul M. Cook
August 27th 07, 01:52 AM
"bookie" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> On 24 Aug, 16:58, "Rene S." > wrote:
> > On Aug 24, 9:05 am, Grawun > wrote:
> >
> > > Does anyone have a cat with a hyperthyroid problem? Mine has been on
> > > meds for some time but it seems now is the time I have to make a
> > > decision about further treatment. Surgery, radiation, iodine
> > > injection, whatever. Does anyone have some advice or information that
> > > will help me make a good decision?
> >
> > Might I ask why you feel you need to make a decision about an
> > alternative treatment? Is she having troubles with the medication or
> > other side effects, or does your vet feel she needs surgery? Have you
> > had troubles keeping her levels maintained?
> >
> > My childhood cat was on thryoid medication for about two years, until
> > the time of her death. She did well and though she remained thin
> > despite being on medication, she was quite elderly and also had other
> > issues (aging kidneys), so we did not opt for surgery/radiation.
> >
> > I recommend discussing your options with your vet. There are pros and
> > cons for each method. I found a web site that lists the treatment
> > options with the approximate cost. I personally think the costs they
> > list for the meds is high, but I guess it depends on your
location:http://www.catthyroid.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=TreatmentOptions
>
> thats what i think, why go for surgery or whatever other drastic
> option if she is doing ok on the medication? jessie is doing just fine
> as was jasper (he died of something totally unrelated, tumour in his
> bladder. at least i don't think it was related)
>
> both the options of surgery and radioactive iodine treatment are quite
> major and i wonder if there si any real need to put the poor lamb
> through either of them.
>

If the cat will take pills without clawing you to death, that's the way to
go IMHO. The pills are not especially expensive and after a while it is
just a routine like brushing your teeth. Methimazole works very well and is
all the cat needs.

Paul

bookie
August 28th 07, 01:28 AM
On 27 Aug, 01:52, "Paul M. Cook" > wrote:
> "bookie" > wrote in message
>
> oups.com...
>
>
>
> > On 24 Aug, 16:58, "Rene S." > wrote:
> > > On Aug 24, 9:05 am, Grawun > wrote:
>
> > > > Does anyone have a cat with a hyperthyroid problem? Mine has been on
> > > > meds for some time but it seems now is the time I have to make a
> > > > decision about further treatment. Surgery, radiation, iodine
> > > > injection, whatever. Does anyone have some advice or information that
> > > > will help me make a good decision?
>
> > > Might I ask why you feel you need to make a decision about an
> > > alternative treatment? Is she having troubles with the medication or
> > > other side effects, or does your vet feel she needs surgery? Have you
> > > had troubles keeping her levels maintained?
>
> > > My childhood cat was on thryoid medication for about two years, until
> > > the time of her death. She did well and though she remained thin
> > > despite being on medication, she was quite elderly and also had other
> > > issues (aging kidneys), so we did not opt for surgery/radiation.
>
> > > I recommend discussing your options with your vet. There are pros and
> > > cons for each method. I found a web site that lists the treatment
> > > options with the approximate cost. I personally think the costs they
> > > list for the meds is high, but I guess it depends on your
>
> location:http://www.catthyroid.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=TreatmentOptions
>
>
>
> > thats what i think, why go for surgery or whatever other drastic
> > option if she is doing ok on the medication? jessie is doing just fine
> > as was jasper (he died of something totally unrelated, tumour in his
> > bladder. at least i don't think it was related)
>
> > both the options of surgery and radioactive iodine treatment are quite
> > major and i wonder if there si any real need to put the poor lamb
> > through either of them.
>
> If the cat will take pills without clawing you to death, that's the way to
> go IMHO. The pills are not especially expensive and after a while it is
> just a routine like brushing your teeth. Methimazole works very well and is
> all the cat needs.
>
> Paul- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

both jessie and jasper were on felimazole, and jessie is doing just
fine. like you say pilling her just becomes a routine you get into and
no problem really. personally i would not risk surgery with her now