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CoreyWhite
August 28th 07, 12:13 AM
I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
able to be trained, but they do have a way of communicating. Very
often they will let you know that they want to go out in the yard, or
they need food, or their litter needs to be changed. They let you
know when they want attention, and need a good rub, and often I can
tell when they aren't feeling well. I have 2 cats.

I also notice a communication with other animals, that really doesn't
seem very different from my cats. Dogs I know seem a little better at
understanding english and taking instruction, but my cats do okay with
it to. Other animals come around the yard a lot too, their are
skunks, raccoons, and possums, that live in the village gutter
system. I seem them poking their heads out of sewer drains at night
all the time, and find them in my yard. I've had mice come in the
house, and obviously insects. We have a family of deer that come to
our yard almost every day, and bunnies that live around this part of
town. It was only a few decades ago that this area was converted from
a forest into a residential area. My cats are having a bad problem
with fleas, and I've been getting them on me to. We are going to take
them to the vet this week.

I noticed something about the new cat living with me, when he first
showed up. He came to my window crying to come in, for a few days.
He would follow me around the outside of the house, as I moved around
on the inside. Then one day he just snuck his way in. When he first
moved in, he just rolled over on his back and let me rub his belly.
Very cute, and he still does it. He was mean at first though, and
wild. He would bite me if I rubbed him the wrong way, and I had to
train him to let me rub his belly without fighting back. He likes to
race around, and watch the birds in the yard. Still, he is afraid to
go outside for very long, and will always wait at the door to come
back in, unless I sit out in the yard with him. My other cat, who is
much older spends all day outside by himself.

I've been talking to my cat, and he is very much interested in
communication. He makes attempts all the time to communicate. When
he really needs something he will race around the house for attention,
and if he is upset he isn't afraid to bite. I think cats use the same
language we do. It is very easy for them to either say "yes", or
"no". If you look at a cat, and say "Here kitty, kitty". He might
just come racing over. If he doesn't come it doesn't always mean he
doesn't want to, but it can be a good sign. If you go up to the cat
and pet him, he might start purring anyway. So maybe he was just
comfortable enough that he didn't want to run over and sit in your
lap, but cats rarely will say no if you want to pet them. Still, they
have their ways of saying "No." to you as well, they may not bite you,
but they could run off someplace, or find another way to show you they
don't approve.

It is really obvious that cats have ways of telling us when they
approve of something, or when they don't. They can tell us when they
want something from us very easily too. So they are already
communicating in our language. They may not be as proficient as great
apes, whom use sign language to communicate. But still I think if you
spend time with your pets, there is a lot we don't understand about
how much they are really able to communicate. I think the television,
can get in the way because it is always talking and must be awfully
confusing, but then again some nice music might help cats, and I think
they could enjoy it as much as us.

I've found that when I'm trying to get my cats attention, just using a
call like: "Kitty, kitty, kitty", doesn't work as well, as going up to
them and talking to them in other ways. When you know you are
spending quality time with an animal, and he is happier with how you
are treating him than he normally would be, then you can use another
word like "Good boy". Animals have a hard time understanding language
when all you do is call them their name, or tell them to quit ****ing
on the rug. I don't believe it is a good idea to discipline cats
really. But if you want to explain something to them, and give them
the option of communicating with you about it, then it is a good idea
to use a word like "Good boy" with them when you do it, so they
associate it with quality time. I think that's a better way to
communicate with animals, but maybe not to train them. I've seen some
animals on TV who could communicate so well their owners were able to
help them solve math problems. I'm wondering if a cat could be taught
to do that. Would probably really creep people out. I don't know many
people who care for cats.

CoreyWhite
August 28th 07, 12:49 AM
On Aug 27, 7:13 pm, CoreyWhite > wrote:
> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
> able to be trained, but they do have a way of communicating. Very
> often they will let you know that they want to go out in the yard, or
> they need food, or their litter needs to be changed. They let you
> know when they want attention, and need a good rub, and often I can
> tell when they aren't feeling well. I have 2 cats.
>
> I also notice a communication with other animals, that really doesn't
> seem very different from my cats. Dogs I know seem a little better at
> understanding english and taking instruction, but my cats do okay with
> it to. Other animals come around the yard a lot too, their are
> skunks, raccoons, and possums, that live in the village gutter
> system. I seem them poking their heads out of sewer drains at night
> all the time, and find them in my yard. I've had mice come in the
> house, and obviously insects. We have a family of deer that come to
> our yard almost every day, and bunnies that live around this part of
> town. It was only a few decades ago that this area was converted from
> a forest into a residential area. My cats are having a bad problem
> with fleas, and I've been getting them on me to. We are going to take
> them to the vet this week.
>
> I noticed something about the new cat living with me, when he first
> showed up. He came to my window crying to come in, for a few days.
> He would follow me around the outside of the house, as I moved around
> on the inside. Then one day he just snuck his way in. When he first
> moved in, he just rolled over on his back and let me rub his belly.
> Very cute, and he still does it. He was mean at first though, and
> wild. He would bite me if I rubbed him the wrong way, and I had to
> train him to let me rub his belly without fighting back. He likes to
> race around, and watch the birds in the yard. Still, he is afraid to
> go outside for very long, and will always wait at the door to come
> back in, unless I sit out in the yard with him. My other cat, who is
> much older spends all day outside by himself.
>
> I've been talking to my cat, and he is very much interested in
> communication. He makes attempts all the time to communicate. When
> he really needs something he will race around the house for attention,
> and if he is upset he isn't afraid to bite. I think cats use the same
> language we do. It is very easy for them to either say "yes", or
> "no". If you look at a cat, and say "Here kitty, kitty". He might
> just come racing over. If he doesn't come it doesn't always mean he
> doesn't want to, but it can be a good sign. If you go up to the cat
> and pet him, he might start purring anyway. So maybe he was just
> comfortable enough that he didn't want to run over and sit in your
> lap, but cats rarely will say no if you want to pet them. Still, they
> have their ways of saying "No." to you as well, they may not bite you,
> but they could run off someplace, or find another way to show you they
> don't approve.
>
> It is really obvious that cats have ways of telling us when they
> approve of something, or when they don't. They can tell us when they
> want something from us very easily too. So they are already
> communicating in our language. They may not be as proficient as great
> apes, whom use sign language to communicate. But still I think if you
> spend time with your pets, there is a lot we don't understand about
> how much they are really able to communicate. I think the television,
> can get in the way because it is always talking and must be awfully
> confusing, but then again some nice music might help cats, and I think
> they could enjoy it as much as us.
>
> I've found that when I'm trying to get my cats attention, just using a
> call like: "Kitty, kitty, kitty", doesn't work as well, as going up to
> them and talking to them in other ways. When you know you are
> spending quality time with an animal, and he is happier with how you
> are treating him than he normally would be, then you can use another
> word like "Good boy". Animals have a hard time understanding language
> when all you do is call them their name, or tell them to quit ****ing
> on the rug. I don't believe it is a good idea to discipline cats
> really. But if you want to explain something to them, and give them
> the option of communicating with you about it, then it is a good idea
> to use a word like "Good boy" with them when you do it, so they
> associate it with quality time. I think that's a better way to
> communicate with animals, but maybe not to train them. I've seen some
> animals on TV who could communicate so well their owners were able to
> help them solve math problems. I'm wondering if a cat could be taught
> to do that. Would probably really creep people out. I don't know many
> people who care for cats.

I"m getting good communication going with my cat now that I'm thinking
about how important it is. I got him to follow me outside without
being annoying, and out on our wood deck, we did math problems
together. He would flip his tale and make a knocking noise with his
tail, and I would count the number of times. We didn't go past 3
times, but he would copy me after I counted the same way using my
hand. He seemed interested in other things at the time anyway, like
getting his fleas off of him, and scratching, but we both enjoyed the
time spent outdoors.

I don't think the TV is good for him inside, he just retreats into his
own little world. The same thing happens with me & my mom. The TV
seems to be driving her crazy. Unless I turn the TV off she doesn't
make hardly any sense. I think the TV & computer are causing minor
epileptic seizures in people, that are just ruining families. Having
electrical lighting seems like the least of the problems.

HAPPYsamuri
August 28th 07, 01:07 AM
perhaps you volunteer to have your hemispehers severed

and then you'd get the brain scans for free

No Name
August 28th 07, 02:23 AM
"CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
oups.com...
> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
> able to be trained,

Cat's can't be trained.
Evidently, however, Corey can.
But it took cats to do it.

Whodat
August 28th 07, 02:53 AM
"CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
ups.com...

> I"m getting good communication going with my cat now that I'm thinking
> about how important it is. I got him to follow me outside without
> being annoying, and out on our wood deck, we did math problems
> together.

So your cat can do math but you need cheat sheets?

>
> The same thing happens with me & my mom. The TV
> seems to be driving her crazy.

Oh yeah, SHE's the one who's crazy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

Lily Moore Tyler
August 28th 07, 03:20 PM
On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:23:03 -0500, >
wrote:

>
>"CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
>> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
>> able to be trained,
>
>Cat's can't be trained.
>Evidently, however, Corey can.
>But it took cats to do it.
>
Actually cats can be trained. It's not easy and they may not
cooperate but they can be trained.

Eldon
August 28th 07, 04:03 PM
On Aug 28, 4:20 pm, Lily Moore Tyler <Send to usenet> wrote:
> On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:23:03 -0500, >
> wrote:
>
>
>
> >"CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
> >> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
> >> able to be trained,
>
> >Cat's can't be trained.
> >Evidently, however, Corey can.
> >But it took cats to do it.
>
> Actually cats can be trained. It's not easy and they may not
> cooperate but they can be trained.

This is true. You have to more or less seduce them into behaving as
you wish. They're quite tricky and even perverse that way.

Or if you want to do it with negative feedback, you get a major water
gun, lurk and wait until they start clawing the couch. Then you blast
them real hard. But it's a lot of trouble and the couch gets wet. It's
sort of like trying to get Corey to stop cross-posting. Maybe it can
be done, but is it worth it?

Alexandra Ceelie
August 29th 07, 12:41 AM
Lily Moore Tyler wrote:
> On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:23:03 -0500, >
> wrote:
>
>> "CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>>> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
>>> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
>>> able to be trained,
>> Cat's can't be trained.
>> Evidently, however, Corey can.
>> But it took cats to do it.
>>
> Actually cats can be trained. It's not easy and they may not
> cooperate but they can be trained.

Just don't try to herd them. (oh my poor Corgi...)

=^..^=
Xandra

No Name
August 29th 07, 04:45 PM
"Lily Moore Tyler" <Send to usenet> wrote in message
...
> On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:23:03 -0500, >
> wrote:
>
>>
>>"CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
oups.com...
>>> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
>>> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
>>> able to be trained,
>>
>>Cat's can't be trained.
>>Evidently, however, Corey can.
>>But it took cats to do it.
>>
> Actually cats can be trained. It's not easy and they may not
> cooperate but they can be trained.

When it appears that a cat is being trained
the cat is just messing with your mind!

No Name
August 29th 07, 04:46 PM
"Eldon" > wrote in message
ups.com...
> On Aug 28, 4:20 pm, Lily Moore Tyler <Send to usenet> wrote:
>> On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:23:03 -0500, >
>> wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> >"CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
>> oups.com...
>> >> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
>> >> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
>> >> able to be trained,
>>
>> >Cat's can't be trained.
>> >Evidently, however, Corey can.
>> >But it took cats to do it.
>>
>> Actually cats can be trained. It's not easy and they may not
>> cooperate but they can be trained.
>
> This is true. You have to more or less seduce them into behaving as
> you wish. They're quite tricky and even perverse that way.
>
> Or if you want to do it with negative feedback, you get a major water
> gun, lurk and wait until they start clawing the couch. Then you blast
> them real hard. But it's a lot of trouble and the couch gets wet. It's
> sort of like trying to get Corey to stop cross-posting. Maybe it can
> be done, but is it worth it?
>
I'm thinking fire hose.

aine
August 29th 07, 06:29 PM
On Aug 29, 8:45 am, > wrote:
> "Lily Moore Tyler" <Send to usenet> wrote in messagenews:[email protected] .com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On Mon, 27 Aug 2007 20:23:03 -0500, >
> > wrote:
>
> >>"CoreyWhite" > wrote in message
> oups.com...
> >>> I've noticed it with my cats. They can tell you very directly, yes,
> >>> or no, when I ask them questions. People don't usually think cats are
> >>> able to be trained,
>
> >>Cat's can't be trained.
> >>Evidently, however, Corey can.
> >>But it took cats to do it.
>
> > Actually cats can be trained. It's not easy and they may not
> > cooperate but they can be trained.
>
> When it appears that a cat is being trained
> the cat is just messing with your mind!- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I am Nala/Simba. I have a Pride of 9.

Cats always keep options on how to react because they do not like to
have their own minds messed with. The minute they smell you are using
them for your amusement, they play the ace up their sleeve.

Mutual respect and importance in the world. Only train that which has
a purpose for both of you. Cats think like humans. Trust on both sides
a huge factor in training them to put the lid down on the toilet when
they are done drinking from it.

HAPPYsamuri
August 30th 07, 12:02 AM
On 30 Aug, 05:29, aine > wrote:
>
> Cats always keep options on how to react because they do not like to
> have their own minds messed with. The minute they smell you are using
> them for your amusement, they play the ace up their sleeve.
>
> Mutual respect and importance in the world. Only train that which has
> a purpose for both of you. Cats think like humans. Trust on both sides
> a huge factor in training them to put the lid down on the toilet when
> they are done drinking from it.

cool

i also feel to add the difference between cats and dogs and the fact
that soem of their natural body language - expressons to NOT overlap
and hence mixed signals occur

yet they can get on to some xtent - so loneg as the relationship
doesn't get pressurised

aine
August 30th 07, 12:47 AM
On Aug 29, 4:02 pm, HAPPYsamuri > wrote:
> On 30 Aug, 05:29, aine > wrote:
>
>
>
> > Cats always keep options on how to react because they do not like to
> > have their own minds messed with. The minute they smell you are using
> > them for your amusement, they play the ace up their sleeve.
>
> > Mutual respect and importance in the world. Only train that which has
> > a purpose for both of you. Cats think like humans. Trust on both sides
> > a huge factor in training them to put the lid down on the toilet when
> > they are done drinking from it.
>
> cool
>
> i also feel to add the difference between cats and dogs and the fact
> that soem of their natural body language - expressons to NOT overlap
> and hence mixed signals occur

>
> yet they can get on to some xtent - so loneg as the relationship
> doesn't get pressurised

I had a cat who was my wolf/dogs best friend. They acted like neither
wolf/dog or cat when together. Ate, played, slept together. Pressure,
did not even exist to them. I made a burial Cairn for MacTyr when he
passed over. The cat sits and sleeps there. Still best buddies over a
year later.

HAPPYsamuri
August 30th 07, 01:27 AM
On 30 Aug, 11:47, aine > wrote:
>
> I had a cat who was my wolf/dogs best friend. They acted like neither
> wolf/dog or cat when together. Ate, played, slept together. Pressure,
> did not even exist to them. I made a burial Cairn for MacTyr when he
> passed over. The cat sits and sleeps there. Still best buddies over a
> year later.

i think the cool thing with animals is they can teach us - communion
beyond words

just been "sitting" a similar cat dog pair

it takes us back to the simple realities of

food
warmth
company
attention
love - even

forget politics BS whats on tv gossip etc etc

all the verbal "filler" in the day

rather than saying "i love u" to a dog

you can either put it in action with some attention or quality time

or fire up the energy in your chest so they feel it

there's no room for phonies...