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September 3rd 07, 11:17 PM
I have adopted a siamese cat form the humain society. is there any way
to tell if its pure bred? i.e blood/dna tests?

thanks

keaver

cybercat
September 3rd 07, 11:20 PM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>I have adopted a siamese cat form the humain society. is there any way
> to tell if its pure bred? i.e blood/dna tests?
>
I don't know, but if I were you I would hope that he or she is NOT "pure
bred." Pure bred often means inbred and that means an animal that is
genetically predisposed to numerous medical problems. I would love to see
pictures of your rescued Siamese. I have always wanted one.

bookie
September 4th 07, 12:17 AM
On 3 Sep, 23:17, wrote:
> I have adopted a siamese cat form the humain society. is there any way
> to tell if its pure bred? i.e blood/dna tests?
>
> thanks
>
> keaver

who cares if it is pure bred or not? it is a cat, most likely a
beautful one (well they all are aren't they?) and therefore is utterly
precious. End of.

bookie

MaryL
September 4th 07, 01:43 AM
> wrote in message
ups.com...
>I have adopted a siamese cat form the humain society. is there any way
> to tell if its pure bred? i.e blood/dna tests?
>
> thanks
>
> keaver
>

I don't think there is any test that would answer your question. It's
unlikely that your cat is purebred, but it's always possible. However,
mixed breeds (I like the British term "moggie" for them) are often healthier
and less prone to genetic defects. Whatever your cat is, you will soon fall
in love.

MaryL

Meghan Noecker
September 4th 07, 01:45 AM
On Mon, 03 Sep 2007 15:17:21 -0700, wrote:

>I have adopted a siamese cat form the humain society. is there any way
>to tell if its pure bred? i.e blood/dna tests?
>

I don't think there as any way to know for sure, but if it were
important for breeding purposes, you would need papers anyway, and a
shelter is not a place to get a cat with papers.

On the other hand, I understand why we want to know these things. A
couple years ago, I adopted a cat that was listed as a himi mix. I
knew that wasn't true from his face. He looked like a jumbo thick
version of my Balinese, so I just assumed that he was part Siamese or
Balinese and part Maine Coon.

As he got larger and showed off his really wonderful temperment, I was
curious to know if he was part Maine Coon since I had been wanting a
Maine Coon and he seemed to act like one. While at a cat show, I was
advised to check out Ragdolls. They are shown while still immature and
only in one color pattern, so I had no idea that my 17 lb bluepoint
cat was actually a Ragdoll.

Purebred or Wannabe? I'll never know for sure. He looks and acts just
like one, so I call him a Ragdoll. And that only reason I care at all
is because I love his looks and his behavior, and I would like more of
them in the future.


I would say that if he looks and acts like a siamese, he probably is
one. Or is mostly one. As long as you love him, it really doesn't
matter anyway.

Sherry
September 4th 07, 04:40 AM
On Sep 3, 5:17 pm, wrote:
> I have adopted a siamese cat form the humain society. is there any way
> to tell if its pure bred? i.e blood/dna tests?
>
> thanks
>
> keaver

It's probably better if he isn't purebred. Good old moggie genes are
the best. :-)
A lot of masked cats have no Siamese parentage at all.
But hey, he's your kitty. You can call him whatever you want. When I'm
feeling particularly pretentious, I tell everyone my Frank is a
Balinese. :-)
Good luck with your kitty! Another thought--if he talks a lot, gets
into everything,
and wants to be the center of attention, and seems *very* smart, he
probably is Siamese.

Sherry

Sheelagh >o
September 4th 07, 03:46 PM
On 3 Sep, 23:17, wrote:
> I have adopted a siamese cat form the humain society. is there any way
> to tell if its pure bred? i.e blood/dna tests?
>
> thanks
>
> keaver

I used to breed, & the reason that there is so much paperwork
involved, is because of the expense involved in determining the true
pure genetics of the cat in question. Each breed has a number & letter
next to their breed & colouring. For instance a Siamese seal point is
a 24. And a blue point Siamese is a 24a. When I was breeding, we had
to rely on the integrity of the breeder to detail the parentage
thoroughly, so that we could detail a pedigree & register the cats
with the GCCF. If, for instance a breeder has a mother cat who was
caught in season by her father, you end up with a kitten that has so
many potential faults, that it is kinder to abort the litter than
allow them to be born.( By expensive, I am talking thousands of
dollars or pound by the way!!)

Every word that everyone here has told you about all breeds having
their faults, is true. An example of this is that in inbred Ragdoll
can take up to 2 years to reveal that the Ragdoll cat has immune
deficiency, so you don't find out there is a problem until you have
had over 2 years to bond with & love your cat. Of course, by that
stage when you find out that this has happened, it is too late to do
anything to help your beloved cat.

It does happen too. there are unscrupulous breeders who don't give one
fig whether that kitten is fathered by it's grand Sire, & the lie &
say that the father is a different cat altogether. Of course, if they
are caught, the penalties are severe, but that doesn't do anything to
salvage the kitten.
..
In view of this, I agree with everyone else. You have a wonderful cat
whom you love dearly, so if you chose to call him a Siamese, then do!
What difference does a piece of paper make to a cat who also
desperately wants to be loved for who he is rather than what he is? My
advice to you would be, don't worry whether he is a pure breed or not.
it is only ever important to you if you intend to breed from that cat,
& as this is not your intention, then it simply isn't important....

Now to the important thing. When can we expect photos of this
wonderful puss cat? looking forward to them:o)
Purrs & leg weaves,
Sheelagh>"o"<