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Catman 07
September 4th 07, 03:10 AM
About a week ago I totally stopped feeding dry cat food and started
feeding canned fish dinner, supplemented with about 25% canned tuna or
salmon. I've noticed the following changes in my cats behavior:
1) Deeper sleeping during the day,
2) Dreaming, one eye half open, and lots of rear leg twitching,
3) Lots more energy when awake. Tearing back and forth in my home.
4) After my cat ate lunch, I could tell he was thinking about jumping
up on the counter, which he knows is a no-no, and he did not jump, but
I could see the muscles on his back RIPPLING, which was something new.

I find this all very interesting. There sure seems to be a lot of new
stuff going on in his brain. I wonder if it has something to do with
the omega 3 in the fish?

Anyone else had a similar experience?
Catman

Meghan Noecker
September 4th 07, 03:33 AM
On Mon, 03 Sep 2007 22:10:56 -0400, Catman 07 >
wrote:

>About a week ago I totally stopped feeding dry cat food and started
>feeding canned fish dinner, supplemented with about 25% canned tuna or
>salmon. I've noticed the following changes in my cats behavior:



Is that tuna and salmon cat food or intended for people? Cat food with
fish is supplemented with extra vitamins because fish uses up certain
vitamins when the cat digests it. Cats being fed a lot of fish that
doesn't have the supplements tend to get sick and will die if not
treated.

MaryL
September 4th 07, 09:50 AM
"Catman 07" > wrote in message
...
> About a week ago I totally stopped feeding dry cat food and started
> feeding canned fish dinner, supplemented with about 25% canned tuna or
> salmon. I've noticed the following changes in my cats behavior:
> 1) Deeper sleeping during the day,
> 2) Dreaming, one eye half open, and lots of rear leg twitching,
> 3) Lots more energy when awake. Tearing back and forth in my home.
> 4) After my cat ate lunch, I could tell he was thinking about jumping
> up on the counter, which he knows is a no-no, and he did not jump, but
> I could see the muscles on his back RIPPLING, which was something new.
>
> I find this all very interesting. There sure seems to be a lot of new
> stuff going on in his brain. I wonder if it has something to do with
> the omega 3 in the fish?
>
> Anyone else had a similar experience?
> Catman
>

I'm not familiar with these behavioral changes, but cats should not be fed a
diet that is high in fish. You should switch to a canned diet that may
include fish as one component, but it should not serve as the major source.
Also, what is the tuna/salmon supplement? *Do not* use tuna or salmon
canned for human consumption except as an occasional treat; use only those
that are intended for cat consumption. Cats have specific nutritional
requirements, and food intended for human consumption will not meet those
needs.

MaryL

silvercelt
September 4th 07, 06:01 PM
On 4 Sep, 09:50, "MaryL" -OUT-THE-LITTER>
wrote:
> "Catman 07" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
>
>
> > About a week ago I totally stopped feeding dry cat food and started
> > feeding canned fish dinner, supplemented with about 25% canned tuna or
> > salmon. I've noticed the following changes in my cats behavior:
> > 1) Deeper sleeping during the day,
> > 2) Dreaming, one eye half open, and lots of rear leg twitching,
> > 3) Lots more energy when awake. Tearing back and forth in my home.
> > 4) After my cat ate lunch, I could tell he was thinking about jumping
> > up on the counter, which he knows is a no-no, and he did not jump, but
> > I could see the muscles on his back RIPPLING, which was something new.
>
> > I find this all very interesting. There sure seems to be a lot of new
> > stuff going on in his brain. I wonder if it has something to do with
> > the omega 3 in the fish?
>
> > Anyone else had a similar experience?
> > Catman
>
> I'm not familiar with these behavioral changes, but cats should not be fed a
> diet that is high in fish. You should switch to a canned diet that may
> include fish as one component, but it should not serve as the major source.
> Also, what is the tuna/salmon supplement? *Do not* use tuna or salmon
> canned for human consumption except as an occasional treat; use only those
> that are intended for cat consumption. Cats have specific nutritional
> requirements, and food intended for human consumption will not meet those
> needs.
>
> MaryL- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Becareful with supplements, they may not need the extra stuff so this
could have an affect

cybercat
September 4th 07, 09:00 PM
"Catman 07" > wrote in message
...
> About a week ago I totally stopped feeding dry cat food and started
> feeding canned fish dinner, supplemented with about 25% canned tuna or
> salmon. I've noticed the following changes in my cats behavior:
> 1) Deeper sleeping during the day,
> 2) Dreaming, one eye half open, and lots of rear leg twitching,
> 3) Lots more energy when awake. Tearing back and forth in my home.
> 4) After my cat ate lunch, I could tell he was thinking about jumping
> up on the counter, which he knows is a no-no, and he did not jump, but
> I could see the muscles on his back RIPPLING, which was something new.
>
> I find this all very interesting. There sure seems to be a lot of new
> stuff going on in his brain. I wonder if it has something to do with
> the omega 3 in the fish?
>
> Anyone else had a similar experience?

Yes, my cats have lots more energy since being switched to canned
food, and they look better too. Shinier coats, brighter eyes, better
muscle. However--as everyone has said, feel them food designed for
cats. They have nutritional needs that food intended for them addresses.
Also--I know this sounds weird, but it is true--many cats develop
sensitivity to fish-based foods, and scratch themselves raw, get asthsma,
or other problems. Plus, it is cheaper for you to feed them the food they
need. That said, good for you for making the switch! Lots of people
keep feeding dry just because it is more convenient and less messy,
regardless of what they may say. And canned food is better for them.
Two reasons my vet gave: the additional protein, and the additional
water. It seems cats naturally derive much of their water from their
food, so when you are feeding canned food, they are less likely to
become dehydrated and get into trouble.