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September 10th 07, 02:24 PM
Australians cook up wild cat stew
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6974687.stm

Australians have come up with a novel solution to the millions of
feral cats roaming the outback - eat them.

The felines are the descendants of domestic pets and kill millions of
small native animals each year.

A recent Alice Springs contest featured wild cat casserole. The meat
is said to taste like a cross between rabbit and, perhaps inevitably,
chicken.

But wildlife campaigners have expressed their dismay that Australia's
wild cat now finds itself on the nation's menus.

Cat stew recipe

Feral cats are one of the most serious threats to Australia's native
fauna.

They eat almost anything that moves, including small marsupials,
lizards, birds and spiders.

The woman behind the controversial cat stew recipe has said
Australians could do their bit to help the environment by tucking into
more feral pests, including pigeons and camels.

But it was a recipe for feline casserole that impressed some of the
judges at an outback food competition in Alice Springs.

Preparing this unusual stew seems simple enough.

The meat should be diced and fried until it is brown. Then lemon grass
is to be added along with salt and pepper and three cups of quandong,
which is a sweet desert fruit.

It is recommended that the dish be left to simmer for five hours
before being garnished with bush plums and mistletoe berries.

Marinated moggie was not to everyone's taste. One of the competition
judges found the meat impossibly tough and had to politely excuse
herself and spit it out in a backroom.

Wild cats are considered good eating by some Aborigines, who roast the
animals on an open fire.

This outback cuisine does come with a health warning.

Scientists have said that those eating wild cats could be exposed to
harmful bacteria and toxins.

Peeter
September 10th 07, 07:43 PM
-------- PLUS, CATS COULD BE A MAIN SOURCE OF YOGURT ! --------

I picked up an article (following) from an old Louisiana newspaper
that touches on this. I don't believe it. Have any of you seen,
heard,
or read of such crap?

===============================================

GRETNA, La., April 11, 1996 -- Veterinarian Dr. Edward Kreiter told a
stunned audience at the Southwestern Feline Conference today that
two
major U.S. food processors use cat vomit in some of their vogurt
preparations.

"Gastromicturates, a bi-cellular component of feline digestive
tracts," said Kreiter, "has been found to enhance the fermentation
process that is an essential precursor of finished yogurt. It is this
component that is part of the vanilla and custard flavored yogurts -
the lighter-hued varieties."

Responding to a question from the audience after his prepared remarks
on 'The Historical Significance of Felinular Domesticity,' the Baton
Rouge specialist cited what he termed privileged corporate data that,
he said, confirms a closely held industry secret.

"I can't divulge the names of these firms at this forum," he
continued, "however, I can tell you with the utmost certitude that
large communities of cats - mostly mixed breeds - are maintained by
these companies from which are harvested great quantities of
micturate
for use in the manufacture of brand-name yogurt."

Attempting to calm audience fears, Kreiter stated that the amount of
cat vomit per 4.5-ounce container of yogurt is minuscule, less than
one part per hundred by volume.

http://www.gretnasentinel.com

----------

jmc
September 11th 07, 09:51 AM
Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed (9/10/2007
10:54 PM):
> Australians cook up wild cat stew
> http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6974687.stm
>
> Australians have come up with a novel solution to the millions of
> feral cats roaming the outback - eat them.
>
> The felines are the descendants of domestic pets and kill millions of
> small native animals each year.
>
> A recent Alice Springs contest featured wild cat casserole. The meat
> is said to taste like a cross between rabbit and, perhaps inevitably,
> chicken.
>
> But wildlife campaigners have expressed their dismay that Australia's
> wild cat now finds itself on the nation's menus.
>
> Cat stew recipe
>
> Feral cats are one of the most serious threats to Australia's native
> fauna.
>
> They eat almost anything that moves, including small marsupials,
> lizards, birds and spiders.
>
> The woman behind the controversial cat stew recipe has said
> Australians could do their bit to help the environment by tucking into
> more feral pests, including pigeons and camels.
>

(cross posting deleted)

Feral cats are *not* mans best friend in the Australian outback. It's
hunted many unique native species nearly, or to, extinction. Then, so
have domestic cats that are outside roaming.

I get news from Alice Springs, if it was true that someone there had
served wild cat casserole, I would likely have heard about it. The bush
foods contest isn't until next week, anyway.

Aussies already eat camels (and serve them to tourists), and nobody much
complains. Pigeons, by the way, aren't the 'rock doves' from the US,
they're a different variety of dove. Cleaner, but still as ubiquitous.

jmc

chatnoir
September 14th 07, 02:38 AM
On Sep 11, 2:51 am, jmc > wrote:
> Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed (9/10/2007
> 10:54 PM):
>
>
>
> > Australians cook up wild cat stew
> >http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6974687.stm
>
> > Australians have come up with a novel solution to the millions of
> > feral cats roaming the outback - eat them.
>
> > The felines are the descendants of domestic pets and kill millions of
> > small native animals each year.
>
> > A recent Alice Springs contest featured wild cat casserole. The meat
> > is said to taste like a cross between rabbit and, perhaps inevitably,
> > chicken.
>
> > But wildlife campaigners have expressed their dismay that Australia's
> > wild cat now finds itself on the nation's menus.
>
> > Cat stew recipe
>
> > Feral cats are one of the most serious threats to Australia's native
> > fauna.
>
> > They eat almost anything that moves, including small marsupials,
> > lizards, birds and spiders.
>
> > The woman behind the controversial cat stew recipe has said
> > Australians could do their bit to help the environment by tucking into
> > more feral pests, including pigeons and camels.
>
> (cross posting deleted)
>
> Feral cats are *not* mans best friend in the Australian outback. It's
> hunted many unique native species nearly, or to, extinction. Then, so
> have domestic cats that are outside roaming.
>
> I get news from Alice Springs, if it was true that someone there had
> served wild cat casserole, I would likely have heard about it. The bush
> foods contest isn't until next week, anyway.
>
> Aussies already eat camels (and serve them to tourists), and nobody much
> complains. Pigeons, by the way, aren't the 'rock doves' from the US,
> they're a different variety of dove. Cleaner, but still as ubiquitous.
>
> jmc

I magine they are small scranny cats that are have real tough meat!

But those Auzzies are too much!:

http://www.worth1000.com/entries/137000/137050KPRO_w.jpg

http://www.forumspile.com/Owned/Owned-CatThrow.jpg

Meat Tenderization I guess!

James
September 14th 07, 03:29 AM
On Sep 13, 9:38 pm, chatnoir > wrote:
> On Sep 11, 2:51 am, jmc > wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
> > Suddenly, without warning, exclaimed (9/10/2007
> > 10:54 PM):
>
> > > Australians cook up wild cat stew
> > >http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6974687.stm
>
> > > Australians have come up with a novel solution to the millions of
> > > feral cats roaming the outback - eat them.
>
> > > The felines are the descendants of domestic pets and kill millions of
> > > small native animals each year.
>
> > > A recent Alice Springs contest featured wild cat casserole. The meat
> > > is said to taste like a cross between rabbit and, perhaps inevitably,
> > > chicken.
>
> > > But wildlife campaigners have expressed their dismay that Australia's
> > > wild cat now finds itself on the nation's menus.
>
> > > Cat stew recipe
>
> > > Feral cats are one of the most serious threats to Australia's native
> > > fauna.
>
> > > They eat almost anything that moves, including small marsupials,
> > > lizards, birds and spiders.
>
> > > The woman behind the controversial cat stew recipe has said
> > > Australians could do their bit to help the environment by tucking into
> > > more feral pests, including pigeons and camels.
>
> > (cross posting deleted)
>
> > Feral cats are *not* mans best friend in the Australian outback. It's
> > hunted many unique native species nearly, or to, extinction. Then, so
> > have domestic cats that are outside roaming.
>
> > I get news from Alice Springs, if it was true that someone there had
> > served wild cat casserole, I would likely have heard about it. The bush
> > foods contest isn't until next week, anyway.
>
> > Aussies already eat camels (and serve them to tourists), and nobody much
> > complains. Pigeons, by the way, aren't the 'rock doves' from the US,
> > they're a different variety of dove. Cleaner, but still as ubiquitous.
>
> > jmc
>
> I magine they are small scranny cats that are have real tough meat!
>
> But those Auzzies are too much!:
>
> http://www.worth1000.com/entries/137000/137050KPRO_w.jpg
>
> http://www.forumspile.com/Owned/Owned-CatThrow.jpg
>
> Meat Tenderization I guess!- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Eating pussy is a lot better than having them killed at the shelter
and dumped at landfills.