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James
September 15th 07, 09:14 PM
My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
understand. Other times she would come running from a great
distance. In the house she never comes when called.

I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
training with him and got nowhere.

---MIKE---
September 15th 07, 09:43 PM
Amber knows her name. In the morning, when I say it's time to get up,
she gets off of the bed. Tiger knows his name and usually responds to
NO if I shout it loud enough. When he gets on my lap, if I say "don't
bite me" he usually doesn't. If I don't say it he usually gives me a
love bite on the arm.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Sherry
September 15th 07, 10:57 PM
On Sep 15, 3:14 pm, James > wrote:
> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
> understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>
> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
> pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
> training with him and got nowhere.

Mine seem to know several words, like "out" and "hungry?" and their
names. I'm sure
they know more than that and just don't let on. Don't underestimate
them. They're
pretty smart.
When Yoda was much younger, and my daughter was about 16, she decided
to teach him
sign language. He actually caught on to one sign, she'd make a motion
with her hand cupped,
like a fish's mouth opening and closing, and say "Fishy?" for a treat.
Eventually she stopped
saying the word, and he'd see the sign from across the room, and go to
the pantry. I was pretty impressed.
Unfortunately, that was 14 years ago, daughter has long since left
home, and he's forgotten his little trick in
his old age.

Sherry

Grace
September 16th 07, 02:06 AM
Our Lyric knows her name. We don't even have to use our high pitched
kitty voices to call her. She also knows side (outside). Hungy
(hungry), and *no bite*.

Grace

Martha[_2_]
September 16th 07, 02:17 AM
On Sep 15, 4:14 pm, James > wrote:
> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
> understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>
> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
> pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
> training with him and got nowhere.

James,
I know you lost Buttercup, did you ever find Puppy?
Martha

T
September 16th 07, 02:22 AM
In article om>,
says...
> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
> understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>
> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
> pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
> training with him and got nowhere.
>
>

It isn't so much words as sounds. I think I've learned to speak cat more
than my cat has learned human words.

T
September 16th 07, 02:23 AM
In article . com>,
says...
> On Sep 15, 3:14 pm, James > wrote:
> > My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> > sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
> > understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> > distance. In the house she never comes when called.
> >
> > I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
> > pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
> > training with him and got nowhere.
>
> Mine seem to know several words, like "out" and "hungry?" and their
> names. I'm sure
> they know more than that and just don't let on. Don't underestimate
> them. They're
> pretty smart.
> When Yoda was much younger, and my daughter was about 16, she decided
> to teach him
> sign language. He actually caught on to one sign, she'd make a motion
> with her hand cupped,
> like a fish's mouth opening and closing, and say "Fishy?" for a treat.
> Eventually she stopped
> saying the word, and he'd see the sign from across the room, and go to
> the pantry. I was pretty impressed.
> Unfortunately, that was 14 years ago, daughter has long since left
> home, and he's forgotten his little trick in
> his old age.
>
> Sherry
>
>

Yes, they recognize symbols. If I want Angie to come and visit I'll
either pat my lap or wave her in towards me and she responds.

-Lost
September 16th 07, 04:27 AM
Response from James >:

> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she
> don't understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>
> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do
> that pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried
> clicker training with him and got nowhere.

Our 2 dogs, Demon and Pudge know all kinds of gestures, phrases, and
words.

If I smile, baring my teeth, Demon runs to me. Pudge leaps on me.

If I jerk my head in the direction of the door while near the door
that is their cue to come on. Otherwise they have to sit patiently
and wait for a sign that they are allowed to come out. They are
super hyper and overactive so believe me, it is necessary.

They know "Go lay down" or "down." They also know "sit," but I have
to make sure not to say "sit down" or they lay down.

They know "get" means move away now before I strangle them. Just
kidding. "Get" means get away from whatever it is you should not be
in.

They know "no." Although depending on what they are doing sometimes
they persist which requires the extra no, or a louder one.

They both know the sound of me upset when I say their names in that,
"I'm upset with you" voice. They usually go and lay down at that
one.

I can stare at them with a stern face and they go and lay down.

I laugh and they come to me.

Pudge knows "up" and "beg" for treats. Up being just standing up on
her hind legs and beg being she puts both of her front paws up and
pumps the air with them.

Demon knows "up" and "catch" for treats, up being the same as Pudge.
When we say "catch" she stands at attention ready to catch what we
toss at her. And she ALWAYS catches whatever we throw.

They both know "snack," "treat," "steak," and "num-nums." They run
to the Tupperware dish containing their steak treats at those words.

"Do you need to use the bathroom?" or "You wanna' go outside?" makes
them bolt for the door.

Sometimes they are in that I want to play even though it is raining,
or cold as heck, or hot as heck or whatever type moods so I have to
say "use the bathroom" and they break what they are doing and head
for potty zones.

"Let's go" means alright, time to wrap it up and come in. "Are you
ready to go inside" gets them to run up the stairs to the door IF
they are done playing and using the bathroom.

I ask Pudge "are you my baby?" and she hops into my arms and I plop
her over on her back and cradle her like a baby. She got this from
seeing me take care of my own babies and I would say the same thing
to them. I said it to her once playing around and she started doing
that.

Last but not least, Pudge knows "get her" means attack Demon. They
LOVE to play fight and gnaw on each other and saying that gets Pudge
riled up EVERY time. When we are outside and I am sitting on the
porch petting Pudge or whatever, Demon sneaks up behind her, bites
onto one of Pudge's hind legs and drags her down the steps.

Oh wait... I thought of one more. You can get either one of them
riled up and then start smacking on someone and they will attack
that person, playing of course. My spouse likes to get them going
and then smack at my feet. Next thing I know I have Pudge or Demon
or both biting the heck out of my toes.

Sorry for the long ramble! I like showing off how smart they are.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

Stan Brown
September 16th 07, 06:54 AM
Sat, 15 Sep 2007 16:43:33 -0400 from ---MIKE---
>:
> Tiger knows his name and usually responds to
> NO if I shout it loud enough.

Dexter the Wonder cat knew his name and "NO!" He showed that he
understood by pausing for a couple of seconds before continuing what
he was doing.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
"If there's one thing I know, it's men. I ought to: it's
been my life work." -- Marie Dressler, in /Dinner at Eight/

-Lost
September 16th 07, 06:15 PM
Response from "-Lost" >:

> Response from James >:
>
>> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out.
>> I'm sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like
>> she don't understand. Other times she would come running from a
>> great distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>>
>> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do
>> that pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried
>> clicker training with him and got nowhere.
>
> Our 2 dogs, Demon and Pudge know all kinds of gestures, phrases,
> and words.

Oh, and I forgot "mutts." They know that as me calling them. So any
combination of "let's go" and/or "mutts" gets them heading towards
me, normally to the door whether we are going outside or inside.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

WZ
September 17th 07, 01:08 AM
My rabbit Pepper knows "no" - it means "stop whatever you're doing and
run to the kitchen for a treat".

Also "out" which means "oops - mom caught me in the bedroom again"

Wendy & Pepper Z
Chicago

Charley's human
September 17th 07, 08:05 PM
On Sep 15, 1:14 pm, James > wrote:
> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
> understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>
> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
> pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
> training with him and got nowhere.

Charley understands "no", but usually ignores me. He understands his
name; the word "ready", which I say when I'm about to toss his ping-
pong ball; "fetch", which he does if he feels like it; "down" which I
tell him when he's on the countertop, but he just lays down instead
(not perfect communication); and he seems to understand "do you want
your breakfast" no matter how I say it--but I think that's because he
knows the routine.

Michelle

Nona
September 18th 07, 02:17 AM
Lots of words, including the phrase "clip nails" -- their signal to run
and hide.

Nona

K
September 18th 07, 02:11 PM
On 15 Sep, 21:14, James > wrote:
> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
> understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>
> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
> pretty consistently even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
> training with him and got nowhere.

Oh Yes, Several words, but not all of them are words to be repeated in
a fine room such as this one, lol. Binky is the best one with words. I
am "almost" certain he can speak far more Human words than I will ever
know about cat-chat.

I am convinced that the tone of your voice has a lot to do with your
cat's conceptions of the words you use. For instance- If I tell him
it's dinner time, he bounds in like a shot. But, when I tell him it's
vets today, down goes the tail, & Binky goes hiding for an hour or
two. Typical cat!
K.

Grace
September 18th 07, 03:16 PM
Cat's can also tell a lot from our body language. Whenever I get into
the fridge to get ours a snack, she is just all over me, tail up,
making her *murrtle* sound, just a happy camper. But if I reach
inside to get her medicine, she knows immediately without me saying a
word, and off she goes to hide, so it must be something in my action
or posture that gives me away.

Grace

-Lost
September 18th 07, 10:50 PM
Response from Grace >:

> Cat's can also tell a lot from our body language. Whenever I get
> into the fridge to get ours a snack, she is just all over me, tail
> up, making her *murrtle* sound, just a happy camper. But if I
> reach inside to get her medicine, she knows immediately without me
> saying a word, and off she goes to hide, so it must be something
> in my action or posture that gives me away.

I agree. With animals in general I think they can get an idea of what
you are on about by your posture and mannerisms. Even more so when the
animal is familiar with you.

--
-Lost
Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
kidding. No I am not.

---MIKE---
September 18th 07, 11:06 PM
-Lost wrote;

>>I agree. With animals in general I think
>> they can get an idea of what you are
>> on about by your posture and
>> mannerisms. Even more so when the
>> animal is familiar with you.

I'm not so sure. I think they can read minds.


---MIKE---
>>In the White Mountains of New Hampshire
>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')

Martha[_2_]
September 20th 07, 09:30 PM
On Sep 18, 5:50 pm, "-Lost" > wrote:
> Response from Grace >:
>
> > Cat's can also tell a lot from our body language. Whenever I get
> > into the fridge to get ours a snack, she is just all over me, tail
> > up, making her *murrtle* sound, just a happy camper. But if I
> > reach inside to get her medicine, she knows immediately without me
> > saying a word, and off she goes to hide, so it must be something
> > in my action or posture that gives me away.
>
> I agree. With animals in general I think they can get an idea of what
> you are on about by your posture and mannerisms. Even more so when the
> animal is familiar with you.
>
> --
> -Lost
> Remove the extra words to reply by e-mail. Don't e-mail me. I am
> kidding. No I am not.

I think ours know several words "breakfast," "treat," "pellets,"
"NO!" They also figure out what is happening from words, tone of
voice and actions. For instance, as soon as I take the t-shirt off the
top of the carrier, they know that I'm going to put them in for the
ride to the lake or back home. they immediately go and hide.
Martha

jmc
September 21st 07, 02:14 PM
Suddenly, without warning, James exclaimed (9/16/2007 5:44 AM):
> My cat will run to the door when I say out and she wants out. I'm
> sure she knows her name and come but she usually acts like she don't
> understand. Other times she would come running from a great
> distance. In the house she never comes when called.
>
> I had a rabbit who would stand up when I said up. He would do that
> pretty consistantly even without visual clue. Then I tried clicker
> training with him and got nowhere.
>

Meep knows her name (she'll even flick an ear towards us if we mention
her in conversation). She understands "you can come up" (onto my lap)
and "do you want to go out?" (she goes out in our fenced yard, under
supervision).

She knows the different flavors of "no", as in "No [stop that!]!" and
"no [don't start that]" and "no [you can't go out]".

She understand 'In', though I usually need to resort to, "get in the
house, NOW!"

She also understands tone-of-voice, and may ignore a gentle admonition,
but never ignores when I use what I've heard called the "mommy voice".

She's learning "what do you want" - she comes and meows at me, and if
I'm not sure what she wants, I'll ask that, and follow her around the house.

She also understands what I mean by banging her food bowl on the mat,
when she complains that what's in her bowl isn't what she wants.
Picking it up and putting it back firmly down means "tough, this is what
you get!".

She's got me better trained though. I understand:
Food?
Food!
This isn't food, where's the *real* food?!
Scritches? Now!
I want to come up, please.
Out!
Pay Attention!
Clean the litterbox, please.

And a few other communications from my favorite feline :)

jmc

Grawun
September 25th 07, 06:05 PM
My cat probably knows more words than she lets me know that she knows.
She knows her name, she knows "come sit with me." "treat" "let's go
to bed."
"it's OK." "come on." "come up." "no."
Of course she understands fussing around in the kitchen means dinner
or a least a treat. Getting out the carrier means she better hide. She
must recognize the sound of my car because she is always at the door
waiting when I get home.