PDA

View Full Version : making dry food into wet food


John Doe
September 29th 07, 03:55 AM
I read we aren't supposed to feed them pop-top can wet food, because of
hyperthyroidism. Oh well. So I will move them to some premium dry food.
But IMO dry is better if made wet first. Here is one simple method to
wet dry food.

.... put some dry food into a zip style plastic bag, very little at first

.... pour some tap or filtered water into the bag

.... remove the air, zip it shut, and let it sit for at least 30 minutes
or so

.... if it's not completely soft after about 1 hour and there's no spare
water in the bag, add some water

.... mix a tiny amount with their regular food, gradually increasing the
dry-wet food with subsequent feedings

.... keep the unused portion in the refrigerater

It lasts for probably at least one or two days before spoiling. I'm not
suggesting that is a novel method. And if you have another suggestion
for wetting dry food, please tell.

Have fun.

cybercat
September 29th 07, 04:24 AM
"John Doe" > wrote in message
...
>
> I read we aren't supposed to feed them pop-top can wet food, because of
> hyperthyroidism.

Where? What are you talking about?

Rene S.
September 30th 07, 03:57 PM
On Sep 28, 10:24?pm, "cybercat" > wrote:
> "John Doe" > wrote in message
>
> ...
>
>
>
> > I read we aren't supposed to feed them pop-top can wet food, because of
> > hyperthyroidism.
>
> Where? What are you talking about?

I've never heard of this either. When you add water to dry food, it's
still dry food cereal just with more water. Feeding a good quality
canned food is far, far better than doing this (and easier too).

Wayne Mitchell
October 1st 07, 04:42 AM
"John Doe" > wrote:

>> > I read we aren't supposed to feed them pop-top can wet food, because of
>> > hyperthyroidism.

"cybercat" > wrote:

>> Where? What are you talking about?

The pop-tops are only one possible part of the problem. That connection
is indicated in this study:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15070058&dopt=AbstractPlus
http://tinyurl.com/366qqu

Do a search on 'connection "canned food" hyperthyroidism and you'll find
more, most of it about the PBDEs to be found in fish-flavored canned
foods.


"Rene S." > wrote:

> When you add water to dry food, it's
>still dry food cereal just with more water.

....which is the point, since at a given price point the dry food is apt
to be nutritionally superior to the canned food. The only plus on the
canned food side is the water content, which can be important for some
cats. Wetting the dry food -- if your cat will go for it -- could
provide the needed increase in liquid intake, while maintaining the
higher nutrition. (Just don't leave it out indefinitely, the way some
folks plan on doing with dry food.)


> Feeding a good quality
>canned food is far, far better than doing this (and easier too).

Given the added storage requirements, I'm not sure it really is easier.
And you'll likely have to go to a higher price point to get a canned
food which is nutritionally equal to the dry you are currently feeding.

The real argument against just wetting the dry food comes from the cats:
In my estimation and experience, there are more cats who will accept
canned food than there are who will eat water-added dry food.
--

Wayne M.

cybercat
October 1st 07, 06:14 AM
"Wayne Mitchell" > wrote in message
...
> "John Doe" > wrote:
>
>>> > I read we aren't supposed to feed them pop-top can wet food, because
>>> > of
>>> > hyperthyroidism.
>
> "cybercat" > wrote:
>
>>> Where? What are you talking about?
>
> The pop-tops are only one possible part of the problem. That connection
> is indicated in this study:
> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15070058&dopt=AbstractPlus
> http://tinyurl.com/366qqu
>
> Do a search on 'connection "canned food" hyperthyroidism and you'll find
> more, most of it about the PBDEs to be found in fish-flavored canned
> foods.
>


My severely hyperthyroid cat ate only dry before she was diagnosed.

John Doe
October 5th 07, 09:56 AM
Wayne Mitchell > wrote:
> "Rene S." > wrote:
>> "cybercat" > wrote:
>>> "John Doe" > wrote:
>
>>>> I read we aren't supposed to feed them pop-top can wet food,
>>>> because of hyperthyroidism.

>>> Where? What are you talking about?
>
> The pop-tops are only one possible part of the problem.

It's complicated stuff, so we can go with the best clues.

> That connection is indicated in this study:
> http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15070058&dopt=AbstractPlus
> http://tinyurl.com/366qqu
>
> Do a search on 'connection "canned food" hyperthyroidism and
> you'll find more, most of it about the PBDEs to be found in
> fish-flavored canned foods.

Any regular here who can do the simplest Internet search surely
would have found that for herself. And I assumed everybody would
already know. But thanks a lot for connecting the dots.

>> When you add water to dry food, it's still dry food cereal just
>> with more water.

That's assuming cheap dry food. Seems to me that the only plus
side to wet food might be ease of digestion.

> ...which is the point, since at a given price point the dry food
> is apt to be nutritionally superior to the canned food. The only
> plus on the canned food side is the water content, which can be
> important for some cats. Wetting the dry food -- if your cat will
> go for it -- could provide the needed increase in liquid intake,
> while maintaining the higher nutrition. (Just don't leave it out
> indefinitely, the way some folks plan on doing with dry food.)

And apparently dry food can irritate a cat's throat, depending on
the cat I guess.

> The real argument against just wetting the dry food comes from the
> cats: In my estimation and experience, there are more cats who
> will accept canned food than there are who will eat water-added
> dry food.

That's fairly clear. My current plan is to give them high quality
(wet) dry food regularly and one feeding of high quality canned food
as a treat every day or so.